100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 08, 1971 - Image 10

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1971-10-08

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page Ten

THE MICHICAN DAILY

Friday, October 8, 1971

HITS GOVERNMENT ROLE
Ellsberg attacks U.S. policy in d
interview on Pentagon Papers Si j..l.

..........
...........
.... .. ...

*i

4

(Continued from Page 3)
Congress does. And I'm very
anxious that the behavior of
Congress changes in response to
the information that is in these
records.
Nelson: It is obvious from the
Pentagon Papers that a small
circle of diplomatic and military
advisers provided advice to the
President on making his decis-
ions. What alternatives could be
developed to allow dissent to
develop-creative forms of dis-
sent which might save thou-
sands of lives in the near fu-
ture?
Along these same lines, what
is.your feeling on the mass civil
disobedience during the early
part of last May, the Mayday
actions.
ELLSBERG: The individuals
who man the posts in the exe-
cutive branch are human beings
much like the human beings in
Congress, and outside the gov-
ernment. I think that the solu-
tion to the problem of the be-
havior that has led us so far
into this war is not to find some
new breed of official, or some
strain of saint with which to
man these positions, but it is to
take very seriously the advan-
tages implicit in the Constitu-
tion of pitting one set of indi-
viduals with certain institution-
al incentives, a certain power
base and certain responsibilities
to the public against other very
comparable individuals in the
executive.
I think that the answer has to
be not centrally performed in
the executive branch and the
courts. I might add that the
courts are to be criticized in
their past behavior for avoid-
ing the basic responsibility of
addressing very profound legal
questions connected with this
war, just as most Congressmen
have failed to do what they
could in line with their own
Constitutional functions.
GREER: Many people have
DAILY OFFICIAL
BULLETIN
The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the Univer-
sity of Pichigan. Notices should be
sent in TYPWRITTEN FORM to
409 E. Jefferson, before 2 p.m. of
the day preceding publication and
by 2 p.m. Friday for Saturday and
Sunday. Itemsyappear once only.
Student organization notices are
not accepted for publication. For
more information, phone 764-9270.
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 8
Commission on Women: 3540 SAB,
-5 pm.
Epidemiology: H. D. Spencer, "The
Role of Delayed Hypersensitivity in
Blastomycosis of Mice," M1112 Public
Health II, 4 pm.
Astronomy Colloquium: Gunther Els-
te, "Astronomical Microturbulence,"
P&A Colloquium Rm, 4 pm.
Internat'I Folk Dance: Barbour Gym,
8-11l pm.
Professional Theatre Program: "The
Grass Harp," Power Center, 8 pmm.
Environmental H e a l t h seminar:
Bruce Chin, "Cellular Response to
SubThreshold Challenges," Sch. of
Public Health II, 1st Floor Aud., Mon.,
Oct. 11, 1 pm.
01V MBAA
w s

not been able to struggle
through even the abbreviated
form of the Pentagon Papers,
and that's a shame because the
American public should read
that material, but what do you
think, in just a brief form, were
the major lessons, the kind of
message it carries to the public?
ELLSBERG: I think the most
important messages do depend
on a fairly extensive reading.
The messages are not about spe-
cific, particularly startling acts
of deception in themselves or
aggressions of various kinds,
but rather what the documents
reveal of the overall values and
intentions and practices of the
administration. Now, when one
does make the effort, I think
it's an effort that citizens and
above all officials should make,
to read a great deal of this ma-
terial.
In my opinion it's very hard
to avoid a feeling that this has
been an American war from the
beginning. And Americans bear
the responsibility, or a large
part of the responsibility, for all
the deaths in Indochina, which
are certainly more than a mil-
lion since we began financing
this war, and could well be as
many as four to five million-
if all are taken into account.
That's a very heavy load to
bear, it's a very heavy respon-
sibility to think of continuing
it. Given the attitude of this ad-
ministration up till now, and as
I've said I'm hopeful that it
could change, it's clear that
Congress could get us out of this
war, or the public could get us
out, only by opposing the Pre-
sident, and that's a very uncon-
ventional challenge to make to
Congress, and one they are very
EGG ROLLS
OPEN DAILY
and
Sundays-Oct. 10 and 17
Ling Lee, Inc.
foods and gifts
407 N. Fifth
761-8020

unlikely to meet unless they get
a lot of encouragement from
the public.
It is unlikely for the public
to press Congress to do that
unless they and the Congress to-
gether come to regard the war
as intolerable and wrong and
not merely a mistake, because
they will give the President a
great deal of the benefit of the
doubt when it comes to pursuing
or taking care of the stakes.
When you decide that the ex-
ecutive is involved in a criminal,
aggressive, entirely wrongful and
inhumane war, then one's res-
ponsibilities as a citizen are
much stronger.
I think that two things are
necessary for the public and the
Congress to reach that state of
mind in which they will be will-
ing to risk their careers in un-
conventional efforts to end it.
First, information contained in
these documents and second, the
example of respected figures
such as Congressmen, who show
by their actions and behavior
that they agree and that they
mean what they may be saying
already-that the war is wrong-
ful and must end.
(c) 1971, CPS
For the student body:
'A Genuine
& Authentic
A Navy
PEA COATS
$25
Sizes 3 4 to S50
CHECKMATE
State Street at Liberty

4

CONTROVERSY SERIES
LESTER MADDOX

TALKS ON:

BUSSING
WAGE-FREEZE
REVENUE-SHARING
PRIVATE ENTERPRISE

HILL AUDITORIUM
Sunday, Oct. 10-2 P.M.
$1.25 Tickets on sale in Fishbowl and Union Lobby
Also available at the door
COMING OCT. 24: DAVID HARRIS
"Te Bahal Faith and the
Release of Human Potential"
Speaker-DR. DAN JORDAN
U. of Mass.
Aud. B-Angell Hall
Fri., October 8-8 P.M.
When in East Lansing ifs
Underground Bar & Restaurant
T he 'in' nnae beforea andl

NOELLE SET

4.

Florentine
textures
ArtCarved
craftsmen have captured
the warmth and glow
of your love. In classic
Florentined wedding rings.
See our complete ArtCarved
collection today.

... . ....... .

0

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan