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October 08, 1971 - Image 9

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1971-10-08

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I

Friday, October 8, 1971 THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Nine

1Jlome
Rick Cornfeld
John Lindsay knows,
World Series counts
JOHN LINDSAY is living proof that the World Series has not
lost its aura. Had it not been for the New York Mets' Series
victory two years ago, Lindsay today might not be contemplating
whether to offer himself for the White House, for it is said that
after the Mets won their incredible world championship, New
Yorkers were filled with such good feeling that they cheerfully
voted Lindsay back in as mayor.
The Mets' victory has become legendary, and so has the
series feat of one of the players who will take the dugout in to-
morrow's first game of this year's World Series. Eleven years
ago, Bill Mazeroski drove -a Ralph Terry pitch over Forbes
Fields' left field fence, ending a wild seventh game and giving
Pittsburgh its first crown since 1925.
Mazeroski thus provided one of the great dramatic
moments in World Series history, but dramatic moments is
something the Series has never lacked.
More legends have grown up around the World Series
than any other sporting event. Reputations have been made
and ruined because of Series play.
For example, Fred Snodgrass and Mickey Owen are remem-
bered primarily for great Series blunders. Snodgass of the
New York Giants muffed a fly ball in 1912 and gave the cham-
pionship to the Boston Red Sox. Owen, a Brooklyn catcher,
dropped a third strike in 1941, and the Yankees went on to
win the game. Neither one ever lived down those moments.
Johnny Pesky has had 25 years to try and forget holding
a relay throw a second too long in the seventh game of the 1946
World Series between the Boston Red Sox and the St. Louis
Cardinals. Pesky's hesitation allowed Enos Slaughter to make
his famous mad dash from first base on Harry Walker's single,
bringing the Cardinals victory,
Forgetting isn't easy, however. The fall after that Series,
Pesky says, he was watching a college football game on the
West Coast which featured fumble after fumble. "Give
the ball to Pesky," he heard a nearby voice shout. "He
knows how to hold it!"
Some reputations have been ruined undeservedly, as in the
case of Heinie Zimmerman. In. the 1917 Series between the
Giants and the White Sox, Eddie Collins was caught in a run-
down between third and home. Suddenly noticing home plate
was unguarded, Collins scampered home with third baseman
Zimmerman in hot pursuit.
Long after that, people still laughed at the way Zimmer-
man futilely and foolishly chased Collins home, but Heinie
would retort, "Who the hell was I supposed to throw the damn
ball to - the umpire?"
Legendary reputations, however, have grown around posi-
tive accomplishments as well. Willie Mays and Brooks Robin-
son, two defensive marvels, gained their reputations through
World Series play more than outstanding achievements during
the regular season. Mays' stupendous back-to-the-plate catch
in 1954 and Robinson's vacuum cleaner plays last year have
made them living legends.
Two unique accomplishments made immortals out of
Bill Wambsganss and Don Larsen. Wamby turned in an un-
assisted triple play for Cleveland in 1920, and Larsen, who
bounced around for years afterwards, threw a perfect game
for the Yankees in 1956. '
Great feats become all the more great when they happen
in the Series. Grover Cleveland Alexander came out of the bull-
pen in 1927, still reeling from an all-night drunk, to strike out
' Tony Lazzerl with the bases loaded and two out to preserve
a seventh game'3-2 lead for the Cardinals 'and send the city of
St. Louis into a dizzy celebration.
Through the years fans have witnessed titanic managerial
duels between Connie Mack and John McGraw and titanic
home runs by Babe Ruth. Ruth hit three in one game 'in
Sportsman's Park in 1928, but the one he hit in Wrigley Field
in 1932 is probably the most famous hit in history.
Irritated by the constant razzing in that particularly
bitter Series, Ruth stepped to the plate with two strikes
and waved the bat menacingly toward center field.
The next pitch landed in the center field bleachers. The
Babe later said about "calling his shot", "It was a damn fool
thing to do." What if he'd struck out?
Perhaps the tremendous Series drama is one of the rea-
sons the moguls instituted Divisional Playoffs, but if they in-
tended them to have World Series drama, the have failed. The

Spartans

seek

solid

scoring

punch

By BILL ALTERMAN
QUESTION: What is a defense
without an offense?
ANSWER: Michigan State.
The future of this remark is yet
to be decided, but for the mo-
ment the Spartans one sided bril-'
liance is a sore in East Lansing.
In four games this year the
MSU defense has held the oppo-
sition to 38 points. Unfortunately,
the offense has been able to mus-
ter only 43 and the Spartans are
currently left sporting a mediocre
2-2 record.
But shed no tears for Coach
Duffy Daugherty and his offense.
Though sputtering, they, in the
words of Michigan coach Bo
Schembechler "have the nucleus
to come up with an outstanding
game."
Against Notre Lame last week
Daugherty thought he found the
right combination but the Irish'
were just too tough. However, the
Irish weren't the only obstacle
Daugherty saw in his path Sat-
urday. The refereeing particularly
upset the MSU mentor, as he
called it, "the worst refereed game
I've seen in all my years of
coaching." Several Spartan long
gainers were nullified while

Daugherty and the Spartans couldI
only fume.
Still Michigan State had a'
right not to expect too much
against Notre Dame. The Fighting
Irish have one of the top defen-
sive units in the nation. Not to
be expected was MSU's mediocre
performance in their first two
games, when against Illinois and
Georgia Tech, neither especially
good, the Spartans could muster
only ten points. Michigan State
opened by beating Illinois 10-0
and then lost to the Yellow Jack-
ets by the identical score.
The following week MSU erupt-
ed for 31 points against Oregon
State as third - string quarter-
back Frank Kolch led the Michi-
gan State attack with two touch-
down passes. The question facing
Dougherty is whether or not that
is indicative of what he can ex-
pect out of his team in the future.
What Daugherty doesn't have
to worry about in his 18th year
as the Spartan coach is the qual-
ity of his defense. Despite having
the burden of having to be on the
field most of the time, the Spar-
tan defense has not allowed any-
one to move against them for too
long. Notre Dame did get two

daily
sports
NIGHT EDITOR:
JIM EPSTEIN
quick scores against them last
week but the Spartans shut them
out for the remainder of the 14-2
loss.
Leading the defense is junior
safety Brad Van Pelt. An awe-
some 6-5, 223 pounder, Pelt led
the team in interceptions last year
with six and was second in tack-
les with 80.
This year VanPelt has picked
off two passes, and returned both
for touchdowns.
VanPelt and his cohorts in the
secondary have picked off seven
passes and held the opposition to
an average of only 74.3 yards per
game, second best in the Big Ten.
Up along the front the Spar-
tan defensive has likewise turned
in a superlative job.
The big man there is tackle Ron

Curl. Curl, a senior, was all-Big
Ten in 1969 but missed all of 1970
with a broken right arm.
Schembechler called MSU "a
great defensive team," and added
that they could be the toughest
and strongest team Michigan will
play all year. The Spartans' 9.5
points allowed average is sec-
ond best in the Big Ten and their
opener against Illinois showed
what they could do as they man-
aged to hold Illinois to only 150
yards.
The following week, however,
Mihaiu could do little against
Georgia Tech and son, in desper-
ation, Daugherty gave the start-
ing nod to Kolch. Kolch perform-
ed admirably against Oregon
State but could do little when the
Spartans traveled to South Bend.
So Daugherty is faced with the
same dilemma as Schembechler:
Who to start at quarterback?
But the offensive problem goes
deeper than that. The Spartans
are currently a lowly ninth in of-
fense in the Big Ten. Only Illi-
nois has been more inept at pil-
ing up the yards this year as MSU
has been averaging only 229.8
yards in four games.
And their passing game, while
weak, looks good compared to
their ground attack. Spartan run-
ners have been averaging 118.5
yards per game, also ninth in the
Big Ten.
The Spartans, running all year
long out of the power I have been
using fleet Eric Allen at tailback.
Allen, a senior, was voted the
team's most valuable player last
year as he garnered 811 yards
rushing. This year, however, the
speedsters has found the going
tougher and is getting onlyt 3.6
yards a crack.
Up till now, however, Daugh-
erty's offense has been going no-
where, and so once again the
first murmerings of "Good Bye,
Duffy," are being heard.

-Daily-Tom Gottlieb
Eric Allen of Michigan State gallops downfield.

AT SOUTH BEND:

Harriers eye stiff test

By DALE ARBOUR
Today, the Michigan cross
country team will venture down
to South Bend for the Notre
Dame Invitational. This meet is
probably the most prestigious one
of the year other than the NCAA
finals.
Last year, 33 teams and 270
runners competed in this meet. A
similar number of entrants are
scheduled to make appearances
today.
Bowling Green will return to
defend its title which it won
last year with only 51 points.
They have essentially the same
team as last year's and could
therefore be considered as favor-
ites.
However, surprises could be in
store for Bowling Green. Alle-
gheny College is young and high-
ly talented and could give Bowl-
ing Green a run for the money.
Three weeks ago, they ran off
with first place at the Eastern
Michigan Open meet, defeating
host and defending National Col-
legiate Athletic Association Col-
lege Division champion Eastern
Michigan.'

Western Michigan will also be
interested in knocking off rival
Bowling Green, both Mid-Ameri-
can Conference powerhouses.
Western placed second in this
meet last year and has nowhere
to go but up this year.
Eastern Michigan was third in
last year's meet, and will be bring-
ing a stronger team to South
Bend this year. And based on past
performances so far this season,
Eastern 'could bring a few sur-
prises of its owniThey have had
a different top man in every meet
they have run and its anybody's
guess who it will be today. They
can win the meet this year if all
five of their number one men de-
cide to be Eastern's first finisher
today.
The Michigan squad competing
is also strong, and they would like
nothing better than to avenge
their loss last weekend to Mid-
American power Ohio University.
If any team in this meet could
be considered a dark-horse, Mich-
igan is the one. Being thin on
experience and lacking any tra-
dition in cross country, this young

and talented team has the po-
tential to compete on an equal
basis with any of the teams en-
tered at Notre Dame.
Freshman Keith Brown will
lead the Michigan harriers into
battle this afternoon. Freshman
George Khouri, Sophomores Dave
Eddy, Rick Schott, and Mike
Pierce, along with senior Captain
Owen MacBride will provide a
strong crew behind Brown.

The FIFTH HORSEMAN
IS FEAR
(Czech, 1966)
Friday, Oct. 8
7:00, 9:30, 1 1 :30 P.M.
Alice's Restaurant
Alice Lloyd Hall
75c free coffee
NEXT FRIDAY: The East Is Red (China)

Gridde Pickings
Achtung! Get dem Gridde Picks in by midnight!

1i

Residential
Friday,

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN
College Auditorium - E. University near Hill
October 8th, 7:00 p.m. and 9:30 p.m.

1IL

'I

pm

1. MICHIGAN at Michigan State
(pick score)
2. Illinois at Ohio State
3. Indiana at Wisconsin
4. Minnesota at Purdue
5. Northwestern at Iowa
6. Kansas State at Kansas
7. Oklahoma at Texas
8. Georgia at Mississippi
9. Stanford at Washington
10. Army at Penn State
11. Toledo at Bowling Green

12. Columbia at Harvard
13. Delaware at Lafayette
14. Marshall at Northern Illinois
15. Citadel at VMI
16. Ohio U. at Kentucky
17. Wake Forest at North
Carolina State
18. Brigham Young at Utah State
19. Idaho State at Idaho
20. DAILY LIBELS vs.
Anonymous Eunuchs

t

Get ready for autumn colds...
Jn-ycr h T ln& J h

,,

-" a

World Series is the World

Series is the .

TEACH A(

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GODDARD HOUSE
PLAYERS
Call:
MICHAEL SAMMUTT
764-7920

5I2
545nE~vEx
fKmE~1w a5b4

COURSE!

II

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Deadline for course descriptions
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