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October 07, 1971 - Image 9

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1971-10-07

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Thursday, October 7, 19 71)

.I HL M{CI-1IC3RN UAILY

Page Nine

Thursday1 October 7, 1971 IHL MlLMl(~AN LJAILY Page Nin&

Pirates

sink

Giant s;

take

flag

PITTSBURGH (') - Richie Heb-
ner and Al Oliver slammed three-
rup homers while Bruce Kison and
Dave Giusti turned in top relief
performances as the Pittsburgh
Pirates beat San Francisco 9-5 yes-
terday and won the National
League pennant.
The victory gave the Pirates the
best-of-5 series, 3-1, their first NL
title since 1960 and sent them into
the World Series against the Bal-
timore Orioles.
Oliver's three-run homer cli-
maxed a four-run sixth that snap-
ped a 5-5 tie and came off Jerry
Johnson who relieved starter Gay-
lord Perry during the inning. Heb-
ner's three-run homer came in the
second and gave Pittsburgh a 5-51
tie.
Roberto Clemente also drove in
three runs with a pair of singles,
the second hit snapping a 5-5 tie in
the sixth.
Kison took over for Pittsburgh
starter Steve Blass at the start of
the third. He held the Giants to a
single until the seventh when, with
two out, a single, wild pitch and
walk brought in Giusti.
Giusti got out of the jam by
striking out Dick Dietz and did not
allow a hit the rest of the way as
he posted his third save in the

four-game series that left the
Giants bridesmaids once again.
The score was tied 5-5 when thej
Pirates came to bat in the sixth,
the tie having existed since the
second inning when Hebner's three-
run homer got Pittsburgh even af-
ter the Giants had moved ahead on
home runs by Chris Speier and
Willie McCovey.

daily
sports
NIGHT EDITOR:
ELLIOT LEGOW

With their wives keeping up a I
constant clinking of cowbells be- Cash immediately opened the
hind home plate, the Pirates got Cas immedite opned he
started whnscn aea aePirates' first with a single. Heb-
dwhen second basemanDavener followed with a double and
Cash singled with one out. Cash then Clemente drove in both with
moved to s e c o n d as Hebner a single. But Perry pitched out of
;further trouble.

-Associatea rress
PITTSBURGH PIRATE Al Oliver makes his displeasure known
after being ruled out at second base on a force play in Pitts-
burgh's pennant-clinching victory yesterday. The Pirates con-
tended that Giant second-baseman Tito Fuentes (holding ball)
had pulled his foot from the bag.

NEW COMMISSIONER:

Big Eight picks Nei

KANSAS CITY (A) - Charles j
M. Neinas, Assistant executive di-
rector of the National Collegiate
Athletic Association, was named*
commissioner of the Big Eight
Conference yesterday. He suc-
ceeds Wayne Duke, who resigned
early in August to become com-
missioner of the Big Ten Con-
ference.
Neinas is 39. He was named by

conference faculty representa-
tives, the league's governing body.
He has been located in Kan-
sas City with the NCAA head-
quarters since 1961.
Neinas was one of two per-
sons recommended to the facul-
ty representatives by a screen-
ing committee appointed soon
after Duke resigned to succeed
the late Bill Reed in the Big

Griulde Pickings

4 I
I

Peter and Martha walked hand in hand down the primrose path,
their eyes glazed with spent desire. Occasionally Peter would glance
over at his lovely Martha, roll his baby blues and whisper a sweet
nothing.
The two lovers paused in their walk to eavesdrop on the garden
affair of Bobby and Sissy Squirrel. The squirrels rolled over and over
on a pile of nuts, till finally Sissy screeched and kicked Bobby in the
nuts. Peter and Martha went on, charmed by the beautiful little
scene.
"Martha," he said sweetly, "how are fall and a Japanese acro-
batic act alike?"
Martha, her pert eyes sparkling, shook her golden curls.
"Because, my dear, in both cases there is usually a little Nip in
the air," chuckled John, and they laughed.
Back in the city its Gridde Picks time again. To win the scrump-
tious Cottage Inn pizza bring your choices in by Ffi ' midnight.
And we apologize, its Columbia, not Colgate, at Harvard.

Ten.
The other was Jack McClel-
land, 51, commissioner of the new
Conference of Midwestern Uni-
versities and a former Drake Uni-
versity basketball coach and ath-
letic director. Neinas is a gradu-
ate of the University of Wis-
consin where he was a sports
broadcaster prior to joining the
NCAA staff under Walter Byers,
executive director.
Dukealsoheld a position in
the NCAA headquarters when he
was hired as Big Eight commis-
sioner in 1963.
AtWisconsin, Neinas had been
sports director of WKOW radio-
TV in Madison and director of
both news and sports for WEAQ
radio in Eau Claire, Wis.
Neinas said he was "flattered
and honored" over the appoint-
ment, which is effective Nov. 1.
"The decade of the seventies
has been termed by some as a
time of crisis for intercollegiate
athletics," he said at a news
conference. "I think it not only
will survive but will prosper."
The announcement of Neinas'
selection was made by Prof.
Charles H. Oldfather Jr., faculty
representative from the Univer-
sity of Kansas and chairman of
the conference.

Brady mening.ig
Ken Brady, 6-10 center on
Michigan's basketball team
underwent a successful knee
operation yesterday. There
was no ligament or cartilage
damage and bone chips were
removed from the knee.
Brady, who averaged over
12 points last season as a
sophomore pivotman will be
out of action through the non-
conference schedule, but should
be able to rejoin the cagers
in time for the Big Ten sea-
son in January.
grounded out and then the reliable
Clemente stroked an 0-1 pitch to
center off San Francisco starter
Gaylord Perry that put Pittsburgh
ahead 6-5.
At that point, Giants' Manager
Charlie Fox lifted Perry and re-
placed him with Johnson, the first
of two strategic moves that back-
fired against the Giants-for he
was to be the victim of Oliver's
wrapup homer.
Johnson's second pitch to Star-
gell got by catcher Dick Dietz for
a passed ball that enabled Cle-,
mente to race to second. With the
count 1-1 on Stargell, Fox ordered
the slugging outfielder intentional-
ly walked although he was hitless
in 14 previous trips.
That brought up Oliver, who
crossed up the strategy by crash-
ing a 2-1 pitch into the right field
stands while cowbells clinked and
shredded paper rained down from
a deliriously happy crowd of 35,487
in Three Rivers Stadium.
The timelyhitting began when
the Giants came to bat in the first
inning against Blass, who had lost
the playoff opener to Parry. Sin-
gles by Tito Fuentes and McCovey
following an error by Cash got the
first run across.
2 DAYS
B.B. KING
HOWLI N WOLF
FRI.-HILL AUD.-9 P.M.
$2.50-$3.50-$4.50

The Giants came back in the
second to tie it quickly when
Speier hit a 1-2 pitch over the left
field wall for his homer. One out
later, Henderson singled and Fuen-
tes got credit for a single when
Stargell and Oliver let his fly ball
drop between them.
After Mays flied out, McCovey
ripped the first pitch to him into
the right field seats for his second
homer of the playoffs and a 5-2
lead.
It was short lived, however, as
Hebner, the hero of Tuesday's
game, smacked an 0-2 pitch over
the right field fence following sin-
gles by Manny Sanguillen and
pinch hitter Bill Mazeroski.
That tied the score and it was
to stay that way until the big sixth
inning, although a disputed play
in the third inning probably cost
the Pirates a run.
With one out in the inning, Oliver
reached first when Perry's third
strike was a wild pitch that got
by Dietz. Bob Robertson then shot
a grounder to third and Jim Hart
fired to Tito Fuentes at second to
get the force on Oliver.
The throw appeared to pull
Fuentes off the base, but umpire
David Davidson signalled out.
Murtaugh argued briefly, but to
no avail. Catcher Manny Sanguil-
len then walked and Jack Her-
nandez beat out a hit toward third.
But, with the bases loaded, Mur-
taugh let Kison hit for himself,
and the pitcher grounded out to
first. The Pirates had to wait until
the sixth to break through against
Perry, who gave up 10 hits i1i the
5% innings he worked.
SYou Can't Lose 0
O with an v
0 IVORY
o CHESS SET v
o

For the student body:
FLARES
by
& Levi
'# Farah
A Wright
A Lee
A Male
CHECKMATE

1,

I

-Associated Press
THE PITTSBURGH PIRATES and their fans rush to congratulate relief pitcher Dave Guistij sec-
onds after winning the National League pennant on a 9-5 decision over the San Francisco
Giants in Pittsburgh yesterday. The Pirates took the best-of-five series from the Giants, 3-1.

COLLEGE REPUBLICANS
ALL MEMBERS-INTERESTED
VOTER REGISTRATION DISCUSSED
Meeting Tonight Mich. U. Assembly Room

TEACH A COURSE!
FREE U stillneeds teachers
Deadline for course descriptions
extended until Oct. 11
Bring your course descriptions to Free U office, 2nd
floor Union or call 763-2130 afternoons, 662-9616
evenings and weekends.

11

State Street at Liberty
N EWSPAPERS
Friend of the
CONSUMERS

i1

Aj]

F

Neinas is a native of Marsh- Tickets: Mich. Union t '-
1. MICHIGAN at Michigan State 14. Marshall at Northern Illinois field, Wis., and is the third com- Salvation Records 330 Maynard
(pick score) 15. Citadel at VMI missioner of the 65-year-old ath- 330 Maynard, 1103 S. Univ.
2. Illinois at Ohio State 16. Ohio U. at Kentucky letic association. He and his wife, __ _0oooooJ
3. Indiana at Wisconsin 17. Wake Forest at North Caryl, have two. sons. They live
4. Minnesota at Purdue Carolina State at Lake Quivira in Kansas City,
5. Northwestern at Iowa 1U.BrighaKameinu' maat UtahStatelKan.
6. Kansas State at Kansas (Neinas'imhamjYounr responsibility
7. Oklahoma at Texas 19. Idaho State at Idaho with the NCAA has been his su-
8. Georgia at Mississippi 20. DAILY LIBELS vs. pervision of the NCAA cham-
9. Stanford at Washington Anonymous Eunuchs pionships program
10. Army at Penn State
11. Toledo at Bowling Green--
12. Columbia at Harvard
13. Delaware at Lafayette Freshmen and Sophomores in
LS&A may make appointments for
MICHIGAN UNION
Billiards $1 /hr. Advance 0 5||810
Table Tennis 50c beginning Monday, Oct. 11
10 a.m.-noon Mon -Sat at 1213 Angell Hall
1 p.m.-6 p m Sunday
ANNOUNCING THE
3rd ANNUAL TEE & SKI $24 and
(BIGGER THAN EVER) $30
SKI SHOW
Saturday, October 9, 10 AM.-6 P.M. & Sunday, October 10, 12 Noon-6 P.M.
PRESENTING FOR YOUR ENTERTAINMENT & EDIFICATION:
Representatives from SKI MOVIES (all new)
FROM: " Full Leather Lined
Major Ski Manufacturers AUSTRIA: "CHAMPION SKIERS CLASS" * Genuine Vibram Sole
"WHITE ARLBERG"G
ncluding ...ulCsioe noe
CANADA: "FLIGHT IN WHITE" * Full Cushioned Insole
HEAD SKI CO. COOK BINDINGS "SKI B.C."
ROSSGNO MAKER INDNGS"SKI NO. 324" * Taupe Suede or Brown Gluv
ROSSIGNOL MARKER BINDINGS "~ O 2'
KNEISSEL SALOMON BINDINGS COLORADO: "SKI VAIL" * Oil Tanned Leather Upper
"ASPENGLOW"
RAICHLE DYNASTAR
OTHER SKI MOVIES BY:
LeTRAPPEUR OLIN SKI CO. K-2 ROSSIGNOL DYNASTAR

I

I

Are you still
readinkg
the way your
parents read?
In the first grade, when you were taught
to read "iFun Spot Run," you had to read it
out loud. Word-by-word. Later, in the second
grade, you were asked to read silently. But
you couldn't do it.
You stopped reading out loud, but you
continued to say every word to yourself.
Chances are, you're doing it right now.
This means that you read only as fast
as you talk. About 250 to 300 words per
minute. (Guiness' Book of World Records
lists John F. Kennedy as delivering the fast.
est speech on record: 327 words per
minute.)
The Evelyn Wood Course teaches you
to read without mentally saying each word
to yourself. Instead of reading one word at
a time, you'll learn to read groups of words.
To see how natural this is, look at the
dot over the line in bold type.
grass is green
You immediately see all three words.
Now look at the dot between the next two '
lines of type.
and it grows
when it rains1
With training, you'll learn to use your
innate ability to see groups of words.
As an Evelyn Wood graduate, you'll be<
able to read between 1,000 and 3,000
,words per minute . . . depending on the I
difficulty of the material. -
At 1,000 words per minute, you'll be i
able to read a text book like Hofstadtler's
American Political Tradition and finish 1
each chapter in 11 minutes,
At 2,000 words per minute, you'll be
.able to read a magazine like Time or News-r
Increansenour readin sneedu o to 50' at

week and finish each page in 31 seconds.
At 3,000 words per minute, you'll be
able to read the 447 page novel The God-
father in 1 hour and 4 minutes.
These are documented statistics based
on the results of the 450,000 people who
have enrolled in the Evelyn Wood course
since its inception in 1959.
The course isn't complicated. There
are no machines. There are no notes to
take. And you don't have to memorize any-
thing.
95% of our graduates have improved
their reading ability by an average of 4.7
times. On rare occasions, a graduate's read.
ing ability isn't improved by at least 3 times.
In these instances, the tuition is completely
refunded.
Take a free
Mini-Lesson
r on Evelyn Wood.
Do you want to see how the course
works?
Then take a free Mini-Lesson.M The
Mini.Lesson is an hour long peek at what
the Evelyn Wood course offers.
We'll show you how it's possible to
accelerate your speed without skipping a
single word. You'll have a chance to try your
hand at it, and before it's over, you'll actually
increase your reading speed. (You'll only
increase it a little, but it's a start.)
We'll show you how we can extend your
memory. And we'll show you how we make
chapter outlining obsolete.
Take a Mini-Lesson this week. It's a
wild.hour. And it's free.
FREE SPEED READING LESSON at 6:30

i

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