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October 07, 1971 - Image 8

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1971-10-07

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Thursday, October 7, 1971

Page Eight

WE CALL IT SOCCER'
Home football, Fuller Field?

AP PICKS SPARTANS:

Bo, Duffy ready teams

By ROBERT. HALVAKS
If you were to ask Karol Krotki
where the football action is on
Saturday afternoons in Ann Ar-
bor, he might surprise you by say-
ing Fuller Field, a far cry from
massive Michigan Stadium.
Krotki is the organizer of soc-
cer, better known as football by
the rest of the world, at Michi-
gan this year. His soccer club,
currently with a membership of
30, plays its home games on
Wednesdays at 5:30 and Satur-
days at 11:00 at Fuller Field on
North Campus.
Over the last five years the club
team, made up mostly of gradu-

and bring a lot of experience to
the Michigan team.
There are ten native Americans
in the club, including regulars Ted
Carlson, a forward from Lexing-
ton, Massachusetts and back, Du-
ane Root of Flint.
A premiere player on this year's
team, who brings competitive ex-
perience along with him, is Bob
.......................
Michigan State trounced
Michigan yesterday 6-2 in an
intercollegiate soccer match.
Daniel Boyle kicked both goals
for the Wolverines.

Canham explained why soccer is
not a varsity sport. "If the soccer
club was to petition for varsityI
ranking, they would have to com-
ply with NCAA rules, which allow
for only undergraduate eligibility,
which would force most of the
current players off the team and
in turn cause the quality of play
to deteriorate."
Despite not having an oppor-
tunity to play for the coveted
NCAA crown, the highlight of the
club team season comes in the
second half of November, when
they play the Greater Detroit
Tournament, against the three
other traditional teams the Uni-

ate students and young teaching.............................veisity of Detroit, Eastern Mich-
fellows, has been a very consistent DeFelice a center from San Jose igan, and Wayne State, and four
winner, having won, about 80 per State, an NCAA soccer title con- invited schools.
cent of its games. tender last year. With the exception of a few hot
Although soccer is not a var- Other standouts on the club spots like St. Louis and Califor-
sity sport at Michigan, the club team this season are backs Daniel nia, soccer has not gone over well
team has several varsity teams on Boyle and Mario Winter, center, in this country, as shown by the
its schedule, including arch rival Miguel Taube, forward Ulli Dagge, failure of many of the profession-
Michigan State which they met and goalie Krotki. Most of these al teams in the North American
yesterday in East Lansing. players, if they were eligible un- Soccer Association, including the
Much. of the team's success can der NCAA rules, would easily Detroit franchise.
be attributed to its foreign mem- make varsity squads at universi-
bers, who have been playing most ties where soccer is a varsity sport. As far as Michigan's club team
of their lives in their native lands Michigan Athletic Director Don is concerned, the number of spec-
_ ___ . --------___ - -- ------- --- tators at their home games at
..;:Fuller Field varies, depending up-
on what else is going on.
Ed The club's greatest contribu-
tion to the Michigan athletic
LdUcO A fu g 1scene was last winter, when club
members organized a 16 team in-
door soccer league in Yost field-
house, which went over so well,
Sthat the IM Department has tak-

* By The Associated Press t
Michigan State Coach Duffy
Daugherty called the Spartan's
game against Michigan Saturday
"the most important game on our
schedule" and ordered strict se-
curity yesterday to insure secret
practices for his football team
for the remainder of the week.
Although Michigan ranks as a
two-touchdown favorite in most
corners, Associated Press football
writer Will Grimsley looks for an
upset. His pick:
"Michigan State 10, Michigan
7: The Wolverines have all the
horses, the Spartans have all the
desire. The underdogs throttle
Michigan's touchdown parade."
Daugherty is not commenting
on his offensive or defensive
plans or any possible changes in
personnel.
In the last day of contact
work yesterday, Daugherty had
the Spartans working on the
kicking game in particular with
Borys Shlapak handling the kick-
offs and field goals and Bill
Simpson the punting.
Daugherty said that Shlapak
"is certainly a great weapon,
having a range up to 60 yards."
He holds MSU's record with a
54-year field goal against North-
western last year.

,Asked if the coaches were try-
ing to fire the players up, Duffy
said: "They know the importance
of the game. It means supremacy
in your own state."
Commenting on Michigan's
three quarterbacks, Duffy said,
"They're all good quarterbacks
and hopefully we will be prepar-
ed for all of them."
Ron Joseph, defensive tackle,
said of the MSU team: "Just like
a machine, sometimes it sput-
ters, but our machines have been
greased and I think we are go-
ing to click this week."
Michigan Coach Bo Schem-
bechler sent his Wolverines

through a two-hour, spectators-
barred drill yesterday, too.
Schembechler is making him-
self inaccessible to newsmen, but
has said,
"MSU is bigger and stronger
than any team we have played so
far, and probably is bigger and
stronger than any team we'll meet
for the rest of the year."
Yesterday's practice was the
final heavy one scheduled, in
preparation for Michigan State,
and Schembechler was believed to
be working on "surprise plays"
such as the end-around he sprung
on Northwestern, scoring once
and gaining 43 yards in three at-
tempts.

1

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-Daily-Terry Mccarthy
COWBOY WALKER barrels over the Navy defense in last Satur-
day's rout of the Middies, 46-0. This weekend the Wolverines
travel to East Lansing to meet their old friends, the Spartans.
Walker and his comrades in the Michigan backfield have raced
for 1193 yards in four games.
KHAYAT NEW COACH:

Students, Faculty, and Community Invited
East Quad Room 126-Friday 12-5

en over the responsibility for or-
ganizing the league this year.
Anyone interested in joining
the soccer club should show up
for practices on Tuesdays and
Thursdays at 4:30 at Fuller Field,

Eagles dump Jerry W lliams

tj
m mwvv

1971 CONTROVERSY SERIES

presents
LESTER MADDOX
HILL AUDITORIUM
2 p.m.-Sunday, Oct. 10
$1 .25 Tickets on Sale in Fishbowl,
on the Diag and in the Union Lobby
October 4-8

PHILADELPHIA (P) - Jerry, Williams was brought in by
Williams was fired yesterday as GeneralkManager Pete Retzlaff,
head coach of the winless Phila- who took over the front office
delphia Eagles of the National job when Tose bought the club
Football League. He was replaced from Jerry Wolman, forced out
by Ed Khayat, defensive line in a bankruptcy proceeding.
coach. In Williams' first season, the
Williams, in the third year of Eagles won only four games,
his contract, came to the Eagles losing nine and tieing one. .
from the Calgary Stampeders of This year, after an impres-
the Canadian League. sive 4-2 mark in exhibition play
He hasn't had much success, Philadelphia has been the vic-
and wasseemingly on the way tim of three humiliating defeats,
out after last season's 3-10-1 34-7 to Cincinnati, 42-7 to Dal-
mark. But owner Leonard Tose las and 31-3 last Sunday to San
couldn't find a suitable replace- Francisco.
ment and decided to let him con- Williams blasted both the of-
tinue. fense and defense, charged "lack
10-9
ON.-SAT.
347 Maynard St.
PUIRVEYOR OF THE WORLD'S FINEST WINES

of effort" on the part of some
players, and levied some fines
Tuesday. No one was identified.
"I have issued fines in the past
for lack of effort and I will do it
again if I feel it is justified,"
Williams had said.
On Sunday the Eagles meet
Minnesota, the fourth straight
NFL division leader from last sea-
son, and quarterbacking the Vik-
ings will be Norm Snead whom
Philadelphia traded after last sea-
son's disaster.
While the firing was not un-
expected, naming Khayat suc-
cessor was a surprise.
It had been rumored, that
Tom Fears, former New Or-
leans coach, was the heir ap-
parent, or that Charlie Gauer had
a better shot at the job than
Khayat.
Fears is offensive coach while
Gauer, whom Fears replaced, is
now scouting other NFL teams
Gauer had ambitions for the
head coaching job before Retz-
laff or Williams came on the
scene.
TG
Delta-Sigma-Delta
Fraternity
FRIDAY-Oct. 8, 8-11 p.m..
Live Band & Refreshments
1117 il t

-Daily-Jim Judkis
THREE MICHIGAN DEFENDERS move in, for the kill against a
sole Midshipman in last week's rout. The vicious Wolverine de-
fense which ranks first nationally in scoring defense and second
in rushing defense has registered three straight shutouts.
MSU hosts R gers;
expect bruising battle

04'

By CHUCK DRUKIS
The Michigan Rugby Football
Club will travel to East Lansing
to battle with the MSU Spartans
this Saturday.
Relatively speaking, the Spar-
tans play a considerably lower
quality of rugby than Michigan's
opponents from the last two
weeks - Toronto and Chicago.
Nevertheless, the Spartans will
have several factors working in
their favor.
First, State hustles. They also
hit hard, although they're lack-
ing in finesse.
Second, Michigan has tended in
the. past to play the way the op-
position does. For example, when
the other team has been sloppy in
its passing or coverage, Michi-
gan has had the inclination to let
up and lose the advantage.
Third, State hasn't won against
Michigan in the past two years.
Thus, the Spartans will be up for
the game. A home field advan-
tage along with the thought of

Coming Oct. 24:

DAVID HARRIS

1 i
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Price includes round trip jet airfare PLUS hotel accommodations. (Airfare only also
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OPEN ONLY TO U-M FACULTY, STAFF, STUDENTS & IMMEDIATE FAMILY.
ALUMNI ELIGIBLE FOR CERTAIN FLIGHTS; PLEASE CALL

knocking the Michigan Blue out
of the undefeated ranks should be
more than enough incentive for
the Spartans to be ready for the
game.
However, the Michigan Ruggers
would still have to play rather
shoddily to lose.
The Blue scoring machine has
rolled up 107 points to its oppo-
nents 13. The offense has risen
to the occasion when its aggres-
sive defense has halted the facing
attack.
Furthermore, Michigan's offense
is well balanced. Nine players
have scored for the Blue.
The scoring attack for the Blue
is led by their kicker Richard
Thompson. Thompson, who has
only played in the past two
game, has made two out of three
penalty kicks and nine out of ten
conversions. Thompson has shored
up the kicking aspect of Michi-
gan's game.
Pete Hooper is second in scoring
with five tries. Hooper attributes
his success 4to "being in the right
place at the right time."
Terry Larrimar, Ron Smith,
and Cleland Child follow with 16,
12, and 12 points, respectively.
While the Blue and Gold teams
will travel to State, the Michigan #
Maize will head south to face
Hiram College in Ohio.
-
2 DAYS
B.B. KING t
HOWLIN WOLF
FRI.-HILL AUD.-9 P.M.
$2.50-$3.50-$4.50
Tickets: Mich. Union
Salvation Records
330 Maynard, 1 103 S. Univ.
1S

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For the student body:
A Genuine
" Authentic
Navy
PEA COATS
$25
Sizes 34 to 50
CIHECKiMATE
State' Street at Liberty

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YARN

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MACRAME

Daily Classifieds
Bring Results

SUPPLIES
SALE
OCT. 7-17th

'

Sandler dubbed it Hot Line Leather. Because it's the hottest look in fashion. And
it's coupled with another hot look - bump toes. Together they never looked better
than they do right here. Swift strokes of subtle contrasting color show wherever
Sandler turned an edge - and wherever they turned an edge is enough to make
you turn cartwheels. Here ... there .. . always with care. To bring you the swift-
est oxford of the season. $16.00

WOOL 99c/SKEIN
(4 oz. knitting worsted weight)
ORLON/SAYELLE $1.09
(4 oz. k. w. weight)

JUTE 83c/SKEIN
(70 yard tube)
AUNT LYDIA'S RUG YARN 30c
(70 yds.-cotton and rayon)

Petitioning is now open for
10 LSA seats on the
LSA
JOINT STUDENT-FACULTY

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REGULAR STOCK--ALL COLORS

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Hill

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