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September 30, 1971 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1971-09-30

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page Six
BUDGET WOES

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Thursday, September 30, 1971

Growing financial crisis confronts

U'

(Continued from Page 5)
The final outcome remained
hazy until Sept. 7, when the
Legislature belatedly completed
work on the higher education
bill and slated a $4.6 million in-
ciease for the University - $1.8
million higher than Milliken's
figure.
While the final state appro-

priation gave the University
some room to maneuver this
fiscal year, the actual budget
that the Regents finally ap-
proved 10 days later was far
from encouraging.
Even with the aid of a whop-
ping 16 per cent tuition increase,
the budget was able to increase
faculty and staff salaries by

Student vote swamps
Ann Arbor polities

(Continued from Page 5)
Getting on the ballot isa
problem which has plagued th
party since its inception. A dis
appointing showing in the las
city election was largely trace
able to the necessity of runnin
a write-in campaign.
It is clear that for any thir
party movement to haves
chance of challenging the powe
of the entrenched parties i
must have a place on the ballo
Past experience with suc
movements on both the nation
al and local levels demonstrate
the futility of the write-in cam
paign.
If HR-RIP gains ballot rec
ognition; the battle for the al
legiance of the student com
munity could be the major po
litical confrontation of the 70'
Democrats, for the first tim
would face tough competitio
in getting student votes, an
their efforts to woo that vote
regardless of their outcome, wi
enhance the political bargain
ing position of the students.
How strong of a leverage th
students will have on the Dem
ocrats, or how effective they ca
be in a third party is likely t
be strongly influenced bya
number of other factors includ
ing how their voting power wi.
be distributed through the city'
ward system.
Under state law the city i
required, after each census, t
redraw its ward boundaries i:
acordance with the new figure
In Ann Arbor a commission ha
been established to study th
question but has been thus fa
unable t actadue to a lack o
necessary data.
Despite the relative quiescenc
of the commission, the majo
parties are already manuever
ing in anticipation of the con
troversy to come over how t
draw the city's ward boundar
ies.
In an attempt to asserta
strong influence on the deci
sions of the commission, the Re
publican Party moved to enlarg
the commission by six member
-the six Republican council
men.
This move provoked a prelim
Wo lverines
smell roses
(Continued from Page 5)
been on a team that was so dor
inated by another one."
And the fans,too, were begi
ning to be appreciative. Norma:
at Michigan the action in t
stands, people-passing, drinki
and socializing, take preceden
over the game.
But this year the fans ha
become critical spectators. In t
Bruin game a rare prenomen
occurred. As early as the seco
quarter the assembled gave t
defense a standing ovation, n
just once, but every time th
came off the field.
Michigan and its backers ha
caught Rose Bowl fever but t
year is far from over. Michig
State, Purdue and Ohio Sta
must still be faced in the e
panded 11-game schedule and a
one could spoil the Wolverin
chances.
But for now the impossit
dream is still a reality.

inary test of strength between
a Republicans and Democrats on
to council which could prove a
model for confrontations to
t come' on this issue.
By a 6-5 vote the council,
g splitting along partisan lines,
approved the Republican mo-
d tion. Democratic mayor Robert
a Harris, in a show of strength
r used his veto power for the first
it time this term to check the Re-
t. publican bid.
'h This confrontation was how-
- ever merely a prelude to the
s battle royal likely to ensue when
- t h e Democratically chaired
boundary commission brings its
- recommendations to council,
- probably sometime this fall..
- At stake for students is both
- the degree and character of
s. their potential influence.
e Basically two schools of
n thought exist on boundaries: -
d wards should be drawn so as to
e roughly correspond to demo-
11 graphic boundaries thus crea-
- ting a "black ward", a "student
ward" etc. -wards should be
e drawn so that each reflects a
- microcosm of the community
n at large.
;o Which of these two systems
a would results in greater student
- influence in city government re-
11 mains unclear.
's The first has the advantage
of virtually insuring that stu-
s dents will . control the council
o seats of at least one ward.
n Some contend, however, that
s. the extent of the student vote
s is greatly underestimated and
e that students could eventually
r be decisive in council races in
f at least three wards. Fordthem
the second system would be
e more acceptable as it would
r spread the student vote out ov-
- er a number of wards.
- Many of the questions in the
o riddle of student electoral pow-
- er remain at this stage unan-
swered. Will HR-RIP make the
a October deadline for filing pe-
titions for ballot recognition?
- How will the wards be drawn?
e Who will students support if
' they do achieve recognition? Is
- the third party movement dead
if they don't?
- While the registration ques-
tion was largely settled this
month these other questions
have been only partially ans-
wered, as the student vote issue
promises to be a continually
evolving struggle.
r U

only 6.5 per cent-significantly
less than the 8.1 per cent in-
crease received by state civil
service employes.
Moreover, to help make ends
meet, the University reduced its
annual payment to the city of
Ann Arbor for police and fire
services from $1.1 million to
$350,000-which was a severe,
though expected blow for the
financially-troubled city.
Finally, amid the neatly
printed columns of expenditures
was the three per cent cutback
in University programs-an in-
delible witness to the effects of
the declining state financial
support.
Discouraging as they are, the
features of the 1971-72 Univer-
sity budget appear to be merely
symptoms of a greater malaise
yet to come, in the eyes of Uni-
versity officials.
The University has already
been given notice by the gover-
nor's budget bureau that the
state appropriation next year
will try to meet funding needs
in only a specific few areas.
And administrators anticipate
that there wiil be virtually no
funds for new programs or ex-
pansion of old programs-unless
the University begins the pain-
ful and potentially controversial
step of selectively cutting the
budget. "We are in 4 period
when we are going to have to
direct more concern at studied
evaluation of programs with a
view to weeding out those which
are deemed less essential than
others to the mission of the
University," President Fleming

And that idea, more than
anything else, represents per-
haps the most agonizing conse-
quence of the financial crisis.
For the first time, the Univer-
sity will be forced to make very
difficult value judgments, jud-
gments that may result in re-
ducing the quality of specific
departments, and in eliminating
certain centers, programs and
courses, so that others can ex-
pand and new ones can begin.
What complicates the problem
is the fact that these decisions
are bound to reflect the view-
points and philosophies of those
who make them-and in a com-
munity with as wide a diversity
of politics as the University,
there will be controversy.
Last summer, for example, a
group of radical students and
faculty lodged a strong protest
against the impending decision
of the literary college and the
Regents to close the Center for
Research on Conflict Resolu-
tion, which concentrated on
peace research.
Administrators argued that
center was poorly managed and
was costing the University too
much for what it was producing.
Subesequently, the center was
closed as part of this year's bud-
get cutback.
Faced with the necessity of
making many far-reaching pri-
ority decisions, the administra-
tion has named a special com-
mittee to evolve a planning me-
chanism that would be accep-
table to the University commun-
ity. The committee is expected
to release a report within the
next few weeks.

M e a nwhile, administrators
say the state appropriations re-
quest for the next fiscal year
will soon be submitted to the
state. They correctly observe
that it is a strange request -
for the first time in recent
years, the University is asking
for a smaller increase than it
requested last time.
Once, this might have been
an omen. But one month into
the academic year, it has be-
come a trend of the times.

For the student body:
LEVI'S
CORDUROY
Slim Fits . . . $6.98
(All Colors)
Bells.......$8.50
DENIM
Bush Jeans . $10.00
Bells ...... $8.00

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on all
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Boot Jeans
Pre-Shrunk
Super Slims

$7.50
$7.50
$7.00

CHECKMATE
State Street at Liberty.
--- i

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Olives - Bacon - Green Peppers - Anchovies - Onions
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Of one that loved not wisely, but too well ..
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BY THE GREATEST ACTOR OF OUR TIME.

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told the faculty

Monday night.

Creative Shabbal ServiceE
Guest: HON. M. RAVIV
COUNSUL, ISRAELI EMBASSY
WASHINGTON, D.C.
FRIDAY, OCT. 1, 6:15 P.M.
HILLEL, 1429 HILL
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U
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only 12.95
SAME DAY SERVICE AVAILABLE
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r GOOD FOREVERr
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Broasted Chicken 1.39
3 pcs.of chicken with french fries, slaw and a
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Hamburg ..... .39c
This delicious hamburg is grilled the old-fash-
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known as the "Hamburger King of Ann Arbor."
at
Lord Nelso1*Si
1315 S University 769-8240

I
Need a Football Ticket?
1 i
Got One to Sell?
Come to UAC's ticket exchange
Friday 1:00-5:00
UNION, Main Lobby
r FOR MORE INFO CALL 763-1 107
Daily ClassiedsGet.
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FRIED CHICKEN DiNNER
(FOUR PIECES OF CHICKEN)

(Includes French Fries, Rolls, Cole Slaw, Honey and Ketchup)
BUCKET 0' CHICKEN $4.25
(TWELVE PIECES OF CHICKEN)
(Includes Rolls, Haney and Ketchup)
SUBMARINE, FOOT LONG TOASTED $1.25
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(Includes Ham, Lettuce, Tomato, Salami, Italian Cheese,
with our own special dressing on our exclusive
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l LB. HAMBURGERS..............75c
CHEESEBURGERS..................85c
(2 OR MORE DELIVERY)

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