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September 30, 1971 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1971-09-30

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Page Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Thursday, September 30, 1971

P a g e T w o T H E M I C H I G AN111 D A I LY'- '' s 1111 ie

I

IN FOCUS_
Processing: Where and how

Objects to blues review

F _._.. _ .....,__ .._.. .._ _ . .. _ _ ._.. _ _. _..____ _ _ __ _

by Richard Lee

EDITOR'S NOTE: This question-
and-answer column, published each
Thursday, is written by Richard Lee,
a local free-lance professional photo-
grapher. Lee is a member of the Na-
tional Press Photographers Associa-
tion and his pictures have appeared
in national magazines.
Questions may be mailed to Rich-
ard Lee, c/o The Michigan Daily,
420 Maynard St.
To get the most out of photo-
graphy it is imperative t h a t
you do your own processing.
While a negative that is out of
focus or super thin can't be
salvaged, a lot can be done to

turn a print into a work of art
by some judicious cropping,
burning and dodging, and other
darkroom techniques. T h o s e
things aren't done in a d r u g
store machine print. Even send-
ing negatives to a so-called cus-
tom lab is often unsatisfactory.
So now you've been talked in-
to doing your own processing;
the next question is where can
you find a darkroom if you
don't have the space, inclination
or financial resources to set one
up?

Haggyard: Return to
old-time country style

By AL SHACKELFORD
Merle Haggard's new album
might facetiously be called
Merle for the Masses, because
in addition to the usual assort-
ment of fine blue-collar country
songs it offers a pro-hippie tune
called . "Big T i m e Annie's
Square." The inclusion of Hag-
gard material into the reper-
toires of such lame country
bands as the Grateful Dead and
Commander Cody indicates that
this is what some hip music fans
have been slavering for.
Someday We'll Look Back
(Capitol ST-835) finds Merle in
an uncharacteristically mellow
mood, reflecting back over his
rough and tumble past a n d
mooning over false loves. Hap-
pily, Haggard seems to be re-
gressing back to the straight-
forward country sounds popu-
larized forty years ago by Jim-
mie Rodgers. His tribute to Rod-
gers, Same Time, a Different
Train (Capitol SWBB 223) was
a gem, and on his new album
"The Only Trouble With Me" is
directly derived from the homey
Rodgers style.
Also contributing to the old-
timey-feel of Someday is t h e
instrumentation, dominated by
acoustic guitars and the agile
dobro of Stranger co-captain
Norman Hamley. Co-captain
and lead guitarist Roy Nichols
has only a pair of typical elec-
tric solos, on "Huntsville" and
"Big Time Annie's Square." Just
one of the songs could be called
"uptown country" - a pretty
tune called "Carolyn" complete
with a string arrangement.
The album kicks off with the
title song, a huge hit single for
Haggard. It is a syrupy expres-
sion of hope for the future, with
Merle crooning: "Someday when
our dream world finds us/
We'll laugh and count our bless-
ings/In a mansion all our own/
If we both pull together/Tomor-
row's sure to come/Someday
we 11 look back and say/It was
fun." You can probably soon ex-
pect to hear this pretty tune

butchered comically by Com-
mander Cody or some other like
band.
The remainder of side one is
mostly ordinary country done
in Haggard's clean, sorrowful
style. His, voice breaks sadly as
he laments his wallflower life
in Roger Miller's "Train of
Life," and he takes the clum-
siness out of the Red Lane-Dot-
tie West cotton-picking tune
"One Row at a Time." Hearing
the former tune reminded me of
the time that Merle told a front-
row groupie at Cobo Hall to pull
her dress down, saying, "I may
be married, honey, but I ain't
blind."
Old-line Haggard fans will be
floored (and angered) by "Big
Time Annie's Square," as the
supposed Honky-of-the-Western
World describes his strange re-
lationship with a hippie girl
named Annie: "We don't agree
on nothin'/But I'll be danged if
we don't make a pair/My
friends call her hippie/And her
friends call me Big Time An-
nie's square." Old Checotah boy
Merle, telling us that hippies
are okay after all? Yup.
"California Cottonfields," by
prolificrNashville songwriter
Dallas Frazier, is a clasic Hag-
gard performance. The story is
The Grapes of Wrath set to
music, about a poor migrant
family much like Haggard's. The
unmatchable Strangers back up
Haggard's great vocal with style
as Hamlet shines on dobro.
A Hag-written song of his
poor childhood titled "Tulare
Dust" is logically followed by
another of Merle's great convict
songs. The poor country boy,
tired of picking cotton, gets
caught on a big caper and ends
up in Huntsville Prison, w i t h
two life terms staring him in
the face. But the indomitable
Merle vows: "It ain't so far
to Mexico/That I can't find my
way/They're takin' me down
to Huntsville/But I'm not gon-
na stay." Once again, law-and-
order advocate Haggard tells
the law to shove it.

Most dormitories have a dark-
room. The problem is that very
few are open to students n o t
living in that particular dorm.
Those dorms that have photo
clubs open only to residents are:
Alice Lloyd, Residential C o 1-
lege, Markley, Bursley and Mo-
sher Jordan.
However, if you're among the
first few to sign up at the only
three darkrooms open to non-
residents you'll be able to print
to your heart's content.
These darkrooms are at South
and West Quads and at the
SAB. The SAB's is known as the
Small Photo Club and Gloria
Gladman is the President. South
Quad's president is Tim M u r-
phy while at West Quad it is
Randy Bryant. Chemicals a r e
provided free at these t h r e e
darkrooms after dues are paid.
Most clubs are willing to or-
ganize classes to teach incom-
ing members in darkroom tech-
niques and some even offer fa-
cilities for color processing.
Q. Most of my prints don't
have rich black and clean white
tones, in fact they look muddy
gray. What's the problem? -
Beth 0.
A. Assuming you're using fresh
film and paper, and your nega-
tives are exposed correctly, then
the problem in all probability is
in your printing technique.
If your negative is exposed
and developed properly, it
should be printable on a no. 2
paper. If however, it is under-
exposed, i.e., it looks light or
"thin", then it needs to be
printed on a higher contrast
paper, in order to compensate
for the lower contrast thin ne-
gative.
If you were to print y o u r
lower contrast thin negative on
a normal contrast paper, then
it would appear washed-out
gray.
Over exposed negatives, i.e.,
those that look dark or "thick",
have to be printed on a lower
contrast paper, such as no. 1
or 1k2.
It isn't necessary to stock up
with paper in all the different
contrast grades. Certain papers
are available as variable c o n-
trast grades. Their contrast is
changed by using a filter to
change the color of the light
used to print the negative.
Kodak's filters are known as
Polycontrast, the same name as
the paper to be used with these
filters. The set consists of 7
filters marked in halves from
1 to 4, with the higher numbers
providing higher contrast. No.
2 filter is theoretically the same
contrast as if a filter were not
used in printing on Polycontrast

paper. It is also designated the
"normal" contrast grade.
Dupont has it's own system
known as Dupont Variable Con-
trast. The filters come in a set
of five, marked 0-4. The accom-
panying paper is known as Vari-
gram.
With an increase in contrast
grade, the use of higher filter
numbers in the Kodak system
necessitates an increase in ex-
posure time; meaning: if your
first print was through a no. 2
filter and the resultant print
doesn't look snappy enough and
you'd like to try a higher con-
trast, for example, a no. 3, then
you'll have to increase the ex-
posture time by a c e r t a i n
a in o u n t. However, to make
things easier, good old Eastman
does have a 50-cent calculator
to show the time increase be-
tween various filters.
The Dupont system, on the
other hand, in addition to being

c h e a p e r, does not require a
change in exposure times-with
one exception. To use the no. 4
filter, the exposure time must
be doubled.
Actually for the beginning
printer, that washed-out gray
print may not be due to the
wrong contrast paper, but to
over-exposure in printing if he
had to pull the print out of the
developer before it turned into
a midnight scene.
Most paper is supposed to sit
in the developer bath for about
two minutes for full develop-
ment of a rich black.
If it is removed before that
two minutes because the print
is getting too dark, it's been
overexposed. The remedy is to
adjust the printing time so that
after two minutes in the devel-
oper, the tonal range is exactly
what you want, not after half or
one minute in the developer.

To The Daily:
In reviewing last F r i d a y
night's blues concert, B e r t
Stratton puts down the per-
formance of Buddy Guy and
Junior Wells as "the hype act
of the decade." Guy is called
a "pimping pink cherub" a n d
Wells a "sawed-off James
Brown." John Lee Hooker's per-
formance is dismissed as a
"soft-shoe number."
Why such nasty and obnox-
ious words? Apparently because
these performers are not pure
blues traditionalists; they don't
always play what they were
playing 10 or 15 years ago. They
are innovators and change their
music and performing styles.
And that is too much for self-
styled blues connoisseurs 1 i k e
Bert Stratton.
Stratton's attitude towards
BUILD
FESTIVAL WEEK:
The American
Western
TONIGHT ONLY
Lefl Handed Gun
Directed by Arthur Penn, 1958.
Starring PAUL NEWMAN or
BILLY THE KID. Adapted from
a T.V. play by Gore Vidal.
ARCHITECTURE
AUDITORIUM
7:00 and 9:05 75c

V

-
DIAL 5-6290
ENDING TONIGHT
ANNA CALDER-MARSHALL DIMOTHY DALTON
aCawi a HeatM

the blues is similar to the men-
tality of those who dismissed
Muddy Waters back in the
1940's for daring to switch to
an electric guitar - and also
similar to the mentality of the
folk purists who booed Dylan
in the mid-1960's for going elec-
tric and playing rock and roll.
It's a silly, no-think attitude,
and is appropriately described
by jazz musicians as the "moldy
fig mentality."
-John Magney, Grad.
Sept. 20

This Is It
Imported & Domestic
Leather
Phone 769-4529
1317 So. University
tp
ri

k

First of monthly art
fairs to occur Sunday

I *

By MIKE BARTH
Starting this Sunday, and
continuing on the first Sun-
day of every month, Student
Government Council (SGC),
University Activities Center (U-
AC) and the Office of Special
Services and Programs will be
sponsoring an art fair. This
Sunday's fair will be held in the
Union Ballroom from 12 noon
to 6 p.m.
Every month there will be
different entertainment at the
fair. The sponsors hope to pre-
sent different forms of enter-
tainment such as rock bands,
folk dancing, and varieties of
foreign entertainment.
From April through Septem-
ber the fair will be held on
East University Ave. and from
October through March in the
Union Ballroom.
There is roomfo' 50 artists
at the fair and each will be
charged $2.00 for a table to
cover the expenses of present-
ing the program.

Conceived and organized by
Vic Gutman, the Organization-
al Services Advisor for Stu-
dents, the Art Fair grew out of
the Free Arts Festival that has
accompanied the summer street
art fairs for the past two years.
Sponsors hope that the new Art
Fair will give local artists more
of a chance to display and sell
their works than they have had
in the past.
According to one of the spon-
sors, a turnout of about 150
people is expected at the initial
fair this Sunday. The commun-
ity has been responding well
since the fair was announced
last Friday, he says.
Artists wishing to get a ta-
ble should apply at Room 240 in
the Michigan Union. Anyone
interested in working or selling
food at the fair should contact
Vic Gutman in Room 238,
Michigan Union or call him at
764-7409.

An American international Picture rl
0 1970 American Iaternational Picturm, Inc.
SHOWS AT
1, 3, 5,7, 9 P.M.
-FRIDAY-
"MARRIAGE OF A
YOUNG STOCK-BROKER"

the ann arbor film cooperative presents
DUSTIN HOFFMAN-JON VOIGHT-BRENDA VACCARO in
MIDNIGHT COWBOY
directed by John Schlesinger. Winner of 3 Academy Awards: Best Picture, Best
Director, and Best Screenplay from another medium.
NEW "R" RATING DOES NOT REFLECT ANY REVISION OR CUTS

4

THE ALLEY CINEMA
PRESENTS
TONIGHT ONLY-THURS., SEPT. 30
UMBRELLAS OF
CHERBOURG
dir. Jaques Demy, 1964, in color
A bittersweet romance, entirely in song, starring CATHERINE
DENEVUE and NINO CASTELNUOVO.
SHOWS AT 7 and 9:30 $1.00
330 Maynard
(formerly Canterbury House)
sponsored by ann arbor film cooperative

1]

TONIGHT !-September 30th-ONLY!

auditorium a
angell hall

7:00 &9:30p.m.
still only 75c

I
I

35 mm.

COMING TUESDAY-The Marx Brothers in MONKEY BUSINESS

""I

Progressive Rock
24 hours /day
WNRZ
102.9

&

FRIDAY, SATURDAY
FINNIGAN'S WAKE (1959)
film adaptation of James Joyce's novel done by di-
rector Mary Ellen Bute with an Irish cast.
-AND -
FILM (1965)
pantomime with Buster Keaton, written by Samuel
Beckett, and directed by Alan Schneider.

1

SEATS NOW!
MENDELSSOHN BOX OFFICE, 10-1, 2-5

1

£xe 2li'erii y / UJ2'Ceall
9e~iolna1 Yeadre Yr A-wi

SHOWN TOGETHER

7 and 9:15

L

THlE GALA lINAUGUIRAL PRODUCJTIONf

75c

AUD. A

6

HELD OVER BY DEMAND!
"UNFORGETTABLE! IT IS SO
BEAUTIFUL THAT IT REQUIRES
MORE THAN ONE VISIT!"
--The New Yorker
"A MASTERWORK OF POWER AND BEAUTY!"
-Cue Magazine
"MIGHT WELL BE VISCONTI'S MASTERPIECE!"
--Show

POWER CENTER

1Ar d4e £rri~ ./

a

I

L

IYORLD PIEIIR1

"EXTRAORDINARILY
BEAUTIFUL!"
-Rex Reed
"YOU WILL NEVER
FORGET IT!"
--Ingenue

"A FILM MASTERPIECE!"
--After Dark
"V ISCONTI'S
MASTERPIECE!"
-Mademoiselle
"REMARKABLE! A
STUNNING VISUAL
RECREATION!"

BARBARA
COOK
RUTH FORD
WESLEY ADDY

HOLM
in

CAROL
BRICE
MAX SHOWALTER
RUSS THACKER

Next Monday, October 4, Zara Nelsova, who has been called the "Queen of Cellists,"
will perform in concert with her world-renowned husband, pianist Grant Johannesen,
who can claim equal rights to artistic royalty. Each has received international acclaim

-New York
LUCHINO VISCONTI'S

' THE GRASS HARP"

I

I-

/qe Xf 1. u1 c,4' ~t t1icta6

~1

Book & Lyrics by KENWARD ELMSLIE

Rnnk_&_... ,-_ _ _.._NW.R_ ._M.L_. s J

e

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