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September 25, 1971 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1971-09-25

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Page Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Saturday, September 25, 1971

Page Two THE MICHIGAN DAILY Saturday, September 25, 1971

Playing in Hill Coliseum-
West, Pappalardi, Mountain

Daily-Robert Wargo
McDowell and Tate: Blues

played in juxtaposition

By FARGO
Suddenly it strikes you. What
are these two grown men doing
playing rock and roll?
Lumpy Leslie West and radi-
ant Felix Pappalardi dominate
the four-member Mountain with
West playing last of the new hot
rockers guitar, his eyes flicking
around like a frog, the mouth
twisting to eke out the squeals
from the axe neck - now his
trademark on the ballroom
scene.
Except Hill is no ballroom-
is weirder than its Gamelon/
Muddy Waters/Rubenstein vibes,
filled and half of that by teeny-
boppers and a few low-life Mid-
west groupies. The crowd loves'
it. "Theme From An Imaginary
W e s t e r n." "Nantucket Sleigh
Ride." "Roll Over Beethoven."
Mountain as always heaving a
muddy roar. My ears. Is West
into it as much as last time?
Sure he's into it. Looking like
Jackie Gleason, the same pain
and triumph in an unexpected
face, here I am after spending
years of my life practicing riffs,
"I'm playing in a rock an' roll
band." ("Animal Trainer and
Toad") ; what's this guy doing
showing off his fingers and fin-
ger exercises and even music to
a Coliseum of human animals?
Pappalardi singing sweeter,
West louder. My ears versus
their wall of sound, rows of Sunn
speakers. Pappalardi the most
damned electric bass player
head, nodding, going wild and in
control. They intersperse subtle
tunes but still amplified to
oceans of volume. West, who is
from Forrest Hills not Flushing,
wants to hurl those chords right
at you, show what a badass dude
he can be turning that amp up
to peak. And they can play. At
moments I enjoyed it. I felt my-
self getting older, reminiscing
the lyricism of Jefferson Air-
plane and Quicksilver songs. I
kept reminding m y s e 1 f that
Mountain is better than Grand
Funk and Black Sabbath.
GREGORY PECK in
MOBY DICK
Academy Awards winner
by JOHN HUSTON
"... it's about this whale."
TUES.-Sept. 28
auwd. a-angell hall-75c
17& 9:30 p.m.
ann arbor film cooperative

Preceding the star act of last
night's show was Mylon and the
Holy Smokes, a group which has
been touring with Mountain for
several months now. Pappalardi,
who first gained fame for being
the producer of Cream's albums,
is producing Mylon's second al-
bum and it should be a corker.
I regret to say.
What do three black women
singing hymnally against two
guitarists, a bass, drummer,
piano, and a giant heightened
green suited with a cross on the
back lead singer leaping stomp-
ing gyrating out sound. A cheap
imitation of Joe Cocker. Mylon
playing imaginary solos with his
hands and Mick Jaggering his
face. He and the guitarist who
made Alvin Lee-type straining
faces while playing a one-four-
five progression just outright
infuriated me. And I was even
angrier to have to admit that
they played damned good tunes
damned well. Some rock, some
country, a touch of Gospel. My-
DIAL 8-6416
SHOCKED
REVIEWERS
HAD THIS
TO SAY!

lon came out after his first song
and tells the audience how well
you know. Then his standard rap
a song or two later of how he
was down in Georgia a year ago
with a tie and jacket on singing
gospel and unhappy and how
Pappalardi came and gave the
group money for a place to prac-
tice.
A brief rap on how the freaks
are taking over. Right on. The
group does "Peace Begins With-
in," and it is beautiful, the whole
thing a show, good music, and in
part a joke. Mylon is pretend-
ing to be grooving so heavy with
the Fender guitar player, the
one who has the part of showing
no emotion, but something's
wrong with the amp and Mylon's
tambourine momentarily loses its
inner piece and makes him slam
it against the cable with anger.
I left halfway through Moun-
tain. They are after all my ears
for the rest of my life. I was
actually stoned from being deaf.
Mountain sure sounded better a
year ago when I was eating
meat.
The Michigan Daily, edited and man-
aged by students at the University of
Michigan. News phone: 764-0552. Second
Class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Mich-
igan, 420 Maynard Street, Ann Arbor,
Michigan 48104. Published daily Tues-
day through Sunday morning Univer-
sity year. Subscription rates: $10 by
carrier, $11 by mail.
Summer Session published Tuesday
through Saturday morning. Subscrip-
tion rates: $5 by carrier, $6 by mail.

- ICE -
a future-fantasy of revo-
lutionary struggle within
the U.S.' made by revolu-
nary filmmakers.
sex and violence
.a. and vision
TUESDAY & WEDNESDAY
Sept. 28 & 29
ARM/Michigan Film Society
Saturday and Sunday
Ivan the Terrible
PART I1
1941-1946, Sergei Eisenstein
Eisenstein is the universally ac-
claimed master of composition
& editing. Ivan is his final and
perhaps, his most powerful work.
Part II Contains Eisenstein's only
color sequence. Music by Pro-
kofiev.
ARCH ITECTURE
AUDITORIUM
7:00 and 9:05 75c

N

II

-4

By BERT STRATTON
Twelve years ago folklorist
Alan Lomax "discovered" Fred
McDowell-one of the last of the
living first-generation bluesmen.
That was in 1959, Fred Mc-
Dowell playing acoustic guitar
in Como, Miss. - farming and
working at Stuckey's to make a
.living.
Last night Fred was at the
Alley-five years of playing folk
festivals behind him-a rhythm
guitarist and bongo player to his

and his melodic solos, it's not
Fred McDowell at his best.
It seems to be the fashion to
put tae old men-in front of bands,
like John Lee Hooker last week,
and now Fred. And the strange
part is that the bluesmen want
it that way. McDowell plays with
sidemen because he's so friendly
he wants to get as many men on
stage as he can.
On the other hand there's
Terry Tate who plays by him-
self - acoustic guitar and har-

the ironies-where would Tate
be without men like McDowell
having led the way?
Fred McDowell will be dead
in a few years, Son House will
be dead, all the Mississippi blues-
men will be buried, the oppor-
tunity to hear the blues inno-
vators will be gone-Terry Tate
and other young whites will be
what's left-not to say that the
young men can't play, they can
-Tate can-but it's not the real
thing, it's not the history.
I I
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WHAT IS THE
-an all-campus orchestra!
--sponsored by MUSKET
and G&S!
-performing 3 hit shows!
DON'T MISS THE MASS MEETING
SEPT. 26, 8 P.M.-ASSEMBLY ROOM-UNION
UNIVERSITY THEATRE ORCHESTRA

and

'I

FRIDAY and SATURDAY
SOME LIKE IT HOT
with
MARILYN MONROE
TONY CURTIS
JACK LEMMON
Andy Warhol Calls This
His Inspiration for Trash

-Daily-Sara Krulwich

left and a bassman and har-
monica player to his right. In his
hands, Fred had his electric
Gibson; he's been electric for
three years-.now.
McDowell says he plays elec-
trio because it's a lot less work
s trying to play over crowd noise
when you can turn up a knob.
He also has to play over the hum
of his sidemen.
Playing his bottle-neck style
guitar, a piece of glass on his
third chording finger -he gets
melody from both hands, and
rhythm frem his continual pick-
ing on the bass strings. He
doesn't need any help-he doesn't
sound as good when he gets it.
The other guitars just add more
to the already heavy bassline,
the harmcnica cbscures his lyrics
DIAL 5-6240
ANNA CALDER-MARSHALL TIMOTHY DALTON
MCatw aHrahtlM

monica. He's played with bands,
he's played electric music and
he's come home to the wood-
guitar box and harmonica reeds.
Tate played the opening act at
the Alley-he and his music com-
bined and were fine.
When the plug's pulled out.
old Fred McDowell will be out
in the cold and Terry Tate will
keep on jamming. It's ridiculous,
H At corner of H
State & Liberty
*D DIAL 662-6264

Smokey's friends
don't play
with matches.
0
. .
5- -

7&9

75c

Aud. A

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to appear in modern times.."
Jack Kirkland, playwright
t*t
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This delightfully Wacky book depicts college ilfe at the
University of Michigan during prohibition days. Bathtub
gin sold for 50# a gallons . . co-ed flappers were sweet,
flat-chested playthings ... and there was Garbage Gertie!
HI FROSH! gives you the low-down on the high-step-
ping 53 piece Michigan Marching Band ... hilarious
goings-on in the anatomy lab . .. wild parties at a fraternity
house ... and a lot of other crazy episodes.
After you've read HI FROSH! pass it on to your father,
a brother, or perhaps an Uncle Ben. They'll enjoy it too.

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OPEN 12:45 PM.
Shows at
1, 3, 5, 7, 9 P.
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