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September 21, 1971 - Image 6

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The Michigan Daily, 1971-09-21

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Page Six

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Tuesday, September 21, 1971

Page Six THE MiCHIGAN DAILY Tuesday, September 21, 1971

I 'I

RESPONSE TO NIXON

Common Market rejects trade war

ARE

YOU

READY.

TO

VOTE?*

Students who have passed their 18th birthday may register to vote either
in their home community or in the community where they reside as stu-
dents. The student vote in Ann Arbor will be a significant force for pro-
gress if students take the time to investigate the Ioct a I issues and consider
them objectively.
City elections in Ann Arbor are conducted on a partisan basis, and
most administrators have been nominally Republican. Do you
know which administration introduced the following into our local
government?
Fair Housing Ordinance?
* Public Housing?
* Human Relations Commission?
*Sign Ordinance?
* Park Land Acquisition?
* Code Enforcement in Rental Housing?
* Minority Hiring Policy?
IF YOU CARE ABOUT ANN ARBOR AND ITS GOVERNMENT, REGISTER AND
VOTE HERE. OUR COMMUNITY NEEDS YOU,

BRUSSELS (P) -Europeon
Common Market nations ruled
out yesterday any immediate
trade curbs or other reprisals
against the protectionist m'eas-
ures President Nixon ordered
last month.
Foreign ministers of the six-
nation community decided it
was no time for harsh meas-
ures that could escalate into a
trade war with the United
States.
Instead, reliable delegation
sources said, they reserved their
right to retaliate later, m o s t
likely by domestic measures to
aid their industries hardest hit
by Nixon's Package.
In addition, the sources re-
ported, a meeting of Common
Market ,foreign, finance and ag-
riculture ministers will convene
in early November to work out
a more detailed response.
Ralph Dahrendorf, Common
Market expert on foreign trade,
told newsmen that yesterday's
Smeeting "heralds the debut of
Europe standing on its o w n
two feet. Our problem now is
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that our position is still quite
wobbly."
He said Nixon's Aug. 15 eco-
nomic package showed t h e
United States must now concen-
trate on its own economic jprob-
lems and Europe can no long-
er rely on the same level of
American help in stabilizing the
world trade and monetary sys-
tems.
Nixon's package included a 10
per cent surcharge on imports
into the United States and an
end to the link between the dol-
lar and gold that had stabiliz-
ed the international monetary
system for 37 years. It set off a
crisis expected to cost the Euro-
peans some $2 billion a year in
export sales to the United Stat-
es.
But instead of striking back
with more curbs on foreign
trade, the Common Market na-
tions looked toward moves to
compensatesat* home those in-
dustries most* hurt by Nixon's
action.
Members of the Common Mar-
ket are Belgium, France, Italy,
Luxembourg, the Netherlands
and West Germany.
There was still sharp criticism
of the Nixon measures, espec-
ially the import surtax. T h e
emphasis, however, was on keep-
ing cool heads and a united
front for further talks in Wash-
ington later this month aimed
at resolving the crisis.
"We need not do anything
spectacular today," Hans George

Emde, West German state sec-
retary for finance, told t h e
meeting. Bonn had led the pres-
sure against any decision on te-
prisals now.
Franco-Maria Malfatti, presi-
dent of the Common Market's
Executive Commission, presented
the relatively low-key stand of
no new foreign trade curbs now,
but possible temporary compen-
sation later to home industries
most affected.
" The community reserves the
right to take compensatory or
protective measures which in
any case should be of a transi-
tory nature," he said.
His formula was immediately
welcomed by the foreign min-
isters and it was understood
that Britain and the other na-
tions seeking to join the Com-
mon Market supported this
stand. The other candidates are
Denmark, Ireland and Norway.
All were said to be generally
agreed on these points for re-
solving the monetary and trade
crisis of the past month:
-The U.S. objective of a $13-

billion improvement in its bal-
ance of payments is overambit-
ious and too costly in terms of
trade losses it will force on the
Europeans.
-A general realignment of
exchange rates for the world's
leading currencies should in-
clude a dollar devaluation
against gold, something t h e
United States has categorically
refused.
---The U.S. import surcharge
should go.
The meeting heard a separ-
ate plea from Foreign Minister
Maurice Schumann of France to
coordinate efforts on the con-
trol of narcotics and other
drugs. Foreign Minister A 1 d o
Moro of Italy, who presided,
asked the French to submit for
study a paper with formal pro-
posals.
And the Common Market
agreed to open talks with the
Atomic Energy Commission in
Vienna toward bringing installa-
tions for the peaceful uses of
atomic energy under the con-
trols of nuclear nonproliferation
treaty.

FROM
WPAG-FM 107.1
SEPTEMBER 21-23-9:00 P.M.-1:00 A.M.
THE STORY OF
THE BEATLES,
A 12 Hour Documentary.
What They Sang, What They Said
BROUGHT TO YOU IN PART BY:

I.Awards for Instructors, Asst. Professors,
...: . :.::.: ". :::::;::.c.<' :":::;:::.:: :i ::::::::::>:::: s .." and Jr. Assoc. Professors, and the Uni-
versity Press Book Award for 1971 will
DAILY OFFICIAL Ibe presented at this meeting; reception
immediately following, meeting in
BULLETINU 1Michigan League Ballroom.
B UJ L I~ Application for Graduate Student
Dissertation Grants may be made
through Oct. 1. 1971; two other times
for application will be provided during
TUESAYSEPTMBE 21 the year: first week of Jan., 1972, and
TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 21 April; students expected to have clear
statement of research prob. together
with estimated cost of each major ex-
penditure; project should have been re.
Computing Center: "Use ofthe Tele- vieewd by members of the doctoral
type in MTS," Seminar Room, Com- comm. or chairman of dept; further
puting Ctr., 4, 5 pm. info at Fellowship Ofc, Rackham Bldg.,
Physics Seminar: Y. Tomozawa, "KL Rm 1014, and by calling 4-2218.
-u plus u minus Problems," P&A
Colloquium Rm, 4 pm. LSA Faculty Placem entSe v ce
Meeting: Audi. A. Angell Hall, 4:10 pm. (I .J.I/.Y2.
General Notices The Advance Systems Corp., Ohio,
wil inervewSept. 23, 1:30-5 pm. Stu-
President's State of the University dent reps needed. No investment on
Address: President Fleming will give your part. Full or part-time work. Good
annual address to faculty and staff money. Further detais avail. Register
Mon., Sept. 27, 8:00 pm. in Rackham in person or by phone, 764-7460.
Lecture Hall; meeitng open to all mem-
bers of the University community. The
five Distinguished Faculty Achievement Organization Notices
Awards, the six Distinguished Service S f r -M m

ANN ARBOR

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I

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ELSE!

4

AN OPEN LETTER TO THE UNIVERSITY FRESHMAN COEDS

I

....

Now that you have been welcomed by the RA in your dorm and the friendly bookstore
cashier, the women of Gamma Phi Beta would also like to extend their personal welcome to
you. Our greeting however, is of a different type; not only are we glad you have chosen to
become a part of the Ann Arbor community, we are extending an invitation to you personally
to explore the many diverse facets of our particular sorority.
Don't let that word turn you off so fast! If you claim that you're not interested because
your mind is too open for that kind of thing, then maybe you had better take a second look.
Do you really know what a sorority is, or do you still labor under the misconception that it's
a big old house with funny looking letters over the door? In the past several years, the soror-
ities at Michigan have undergone some pretty drastic changes. They are no longer the glam-
orous social organizations of which your mother speaks, they are not the "in loco parentis"
institutions which your older sister shunned, and they most certainly are not the exclusive

cliques which popular opinion makes them out to be. You will find, if you choose to accept an
invitation, that the sororities at Michigan, and Gamma Phi Beta in particular, are like an ever
expanding collage. We are a conglomeration of distinctly different personalities joined to-
gether by a time tested bond of friendship for the purpose of drawing the utmost from the
university experience-academically, socially, and most important of all, personally. We have
adopted a life style which presents the continual challenge of individual involvement, not so
much of a string of Greek letters or a system of outdated ritual, but to another woman-your
sister.
We believe that we have a wealth of worthwhile ideas and experiences to share with
you. But we also realize that there is an equal wealth on your part which may be shared with
us, so we are taking the initiative in inviting you over to take a look at us. This coming Wednes-
day and Thursday from 7-10 p.m. we are having an open house and we would very much
like to have you stop by. After all, if you don't try a taste of something new how are you
going to be able to formulate an honest opinion of it? And if you come and see and still
don't thing that Gamma Phi is your bag, did it really hurt to expand your mind a little by
meeting some new people?
And so we welcome you to the University. We welcome you to it's independence, its
vast store of knowledge, and its great reservoir of personal experience. But we also extend
to you an invitation to sample the reservoir of experience and personality at Gamma Phi Beta.

:..;r::.......; .......__

I

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