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September 19, 1971 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1971-09-19

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Poge Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Sunday, September 19, 1971

Page Two THE MICHIGAN DAILY Sunday, September 19, 1971

Mu ddy:
By BERT STRATTON
Muddy Waters' band was on
stage playing "W a t e r m e l o n
Man" and "Peepin," jazz tunes;.
.Muddy was waiting in the wings.
--Friday night at Hill Auditor-
ium, midnight, people in the
aisles, people sneaking in con-
tinuously all night, the place
sold-out officially by noon that
day-sold-out to the freshman
who paid five bucks to take the
new woman to the first big
event of the year.hsold-out to
the nuts concert-freaks who'll
go to anything, and sold-out to
everybody who likes good blues.
And Muddy Waters came out,
the outerspace name, the man,
the same man who played with
Son House in Mississippi, and
he played to that big open Hill
Auditorium building, and he
played to everybody with an
enormous, 'indescribable passion
of blues, not sadness, not mel-
ancholy but the whole mixture
of what is this thing called being
in love, being in trouble, being
in life, the whole thing: he
didn't dance around, he sang
around,: he didn't jump around
in hoolahoop frenzy like a 56
year-old clown. Muddy didn't do
that, he played his music, he
played it well, that thi
All those people listening to monica
Muddy at midnight, the man imore
who started a good part of in the
what's the blues t r a d it i o n, higher
bringing the Southern country the sar
blues sounds up North and low re
winding them around the wires from t
and poles of electric Chicago frmatY
land, 1949's, with amplified gui- smallx
tar. and new hard-driving city also be
beats, to play the South Side faction
bars and- create the dark blues, four ye
the city blues. Muddy Waters gotten
Up from Mississippi, he taugh It's ha
the Rolling Stones how to play was at
-maybe, but he taught Magic Andt
Sam, he taught Otis Rush, he ing Mw
taught all the South Side men down
a thing or two. dng 1
down t
Muddy Waters who now plays m a k i
to white college people, not in blues,
the dank rooms of late-night tance
low-pay clubs with nobody lis- at one
tening, but to a million college
students who will sit back and
analyze every move he makes,
if he is cool, if he is jive, if he l
is playing the blues-a crowd I
not raised on the blues, that
wants to learn what makes it go.
With him was Paul Oscher,
the young harmonica man to
follow in the footsteps of Mud-
dy's long line of harp blowers, audi
Paul played Little Walter's a
"Juke," he played everythinga

Vanguard

immemorial

and Junior Wells. Featuring the
same Buddy Guy who when he
came to Chicago in the fifties
was considered to be the heir
to B.B. King's throne, the same
man who let the white blues re-
vival eat him and his guitar
alive. He is the pimping pink
cherub in the facial grimace
Heaven for all jive performers
-playing his guitar with his
handkerchief, witha drumstick,
behind his back; and who cares
if he'd played it from a heli-
copter hovering over center-
stage-it would still have sound-
ed sloppy and routine. A "show"
he has worked out to the finest
details, a show which is very
professional but is pitifully be-
low the capabilities of Buddy
Guy-as he used to be, more
than three years ago-now he
shouldn't be mentioned in the
same breath with B.B. King.
To go along with Buddy Guy
there was Junior Wells, the
sawed-off James Brown of har-
monica doom, who has taken up
dance, put down his harmonica,
and become a success, shining
bright in bellbottom bliss. Jun-
ior Wells used to play good
harp, he used to be called the
Hoodoo Man, he used to even
play a little while without being
interrupted by Buddy Guy. As
a contrast, just think of the
amazing blend of showmanship
and musicianship that harmon-
ica man James Cotton forges.
John Lee Hooker was there
too, a man who most of the
time plays domineering cadence-
like boogies w h i c h penetrate
through auditoriums and clubs
like they're on the express train

to Africa. A hypnotic voice, a
rhythmic pulsating guitar and
the man, Detroit's own, John
Lee Hooker. Friday night the
Man John Lee Hooker was out
back taking a stroll while some
imposter-phantom looking just
like Hooker but without the
depth and beady-eye stare came
out to do a little soft-shoe num-
ber for the crowd. He hardly
p 1 a y e d his guitar, he hardly
sang one comprehensible lyric,
and he didn't play anything
close to a driving boogie; he was
watering his lawn in a suburban
mad-craving desire to trim the
edges and cut the hedges and
get the crowd standing no mat-
ter how bad he really was.
The whole auditorium of
people standing because Hooker
told them to get up, to see him
dancing, which was like watch-
ing your next-door neighbor at
the yearly block party-unco-
ordinated, uninteresting, a n d
stupid. John Lee Hooker goofing
on his pay check for the eve-
ning, it was a terrible goof.
The lead act, Terry Tate, put
Hooker to shame-a young Ann
Arbor harmonica and acoustic
guitar player, who sang deep
and concise blues the way John
Lee can do it when he's good.
Tate was involved with his mu-
sic, his energy spiralled from
himself and was caught up by
the crowd. John Lee Hooker's
energy was zip, it was all the
crowd feeding him.
Friday night, the killer blues
-in memorium, Buddy Guy and
Junior Wells, get well soon to
John Lee Hooker, and long live
Muddy Waters.

LATE SHOW 1 p.m. MON. NITE
WINNER OF 4
AWARDS!
mocguco
BEST SONG
2b CENTURY-FOX PRESENTS
BUTCH CASSIDY AND
THE SUNDANCE KID
AUD. A-ORSON WELLES
Join The Daily

(f/Q- ;y- ,, 0
,
' 0

GRAD COFFEE HOUR
IS{HERE
WEDNESDAY
"we had 200 people
last week"
4-6 P.M.
4th FLOOR RACKHAM
coffee, punch, pastry
discussion
BE THERE

I

F,

in

-Daily-Tom Gottlieb

hose ten holes on a har-
will give,.and he played
by switching harmonicas
middle of tunes to get,
notes-all working to fit
me key, and he played
atic harp with that mel-
sonating sound different
he wailing sound of the
blues harp, which Paul
ent to everybody's satis-
. A man who's played
ears with Muddy and has
so good in those years
rd to remember when he
beginner.
there he was accompany-
u d d y who was getting
with his slide guitar, run-
his metal slide up and
the strings of the guitar,
n g it true, playing the
"Honeybee," "Long Dis-
Call," and then to finish
o'clock with "I Got My
Boy's school-fantasy?
INDSAY ANDERSON'S
if....
Tues., Sept. 21-
7 & 9:30 p.m.
itorium a-angell hall
n arbor film cooperative

Mojo Working," everybody on
their feet dancing, Muddy sing-
ing in that unique tensile vdice
of his-he had come through
the centuries of immemorial Af-
rican tribes and windy days on
street corners broke, all that, to
play before a white audience
who loved him, and he loved us.
As for the rest of the con-
cert, it was simply shuck. it was
a low-class blues revival foister-
ing of what nobody else will buy
up onto young whites. The hype
act of the decade-Buddy Guy
For the student body:
SGenuine
Authentic
Navy
PEA COATS
$25
Sizes 34 to 50

I
4

MICEG

DIAL 5-6290
603 E. LIBERTY
Shown Daily at
1, 3, 5, 7, 9 p.m.

TOM LAUGHLIN " DELORES TAYLOR
Htr1NI4OLd R~A% ii Srrc ..~= ==

STUDENT WIVES
GRADUATE--UNDERGRADUATE
join
MICHIGAN DAMES
The National Association of University Dames
Michigan Chapter-Ann Arbor
GENERAL MEETING
Tuesday, September 21, 1971-8 P.M.
Huron High Dining Room
For further info. col Jean Young-971 -8242
SUNDAY
The Lone Ranger and
the Lost City of Gold
Hi, Ho Silver

I

CHECKMATE

L

w m i w

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State Street at Liberty
of - - M
Program Information 662-6264
DOORS OPEN 12:45
Shows at
1, 3, 5, 7, & 9:05
JULES VERNE
TAKESYOU OVERTE
EDGE OF THE WORLD!

I

MONDAY NITE at 7 :00, 9:00, & 1 1 :00 p.m.
WINNER OF 4 ACADEMY AWARDS I
INC.UDING
BEST
SONG r

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20th CENTURY-FOX PRESENTS
f IULXNKWMAN
ROBERT REDFORD
KATHAR(NE ROSS
BUTCH CASSIDY AND THE SUNDANCE KID
AND. A,
ANGELL HALL

ORDER SEATS NOW!
MENDELSSOHN BOX OFFICE, 10-1, 2-5

7&9

75c

Aud. A

PANAM1KWO4
OOLOR 1.OE LUXE "G
orson welles
film society

.974 lnr.erxuyQo/. /4i an
Mrf2744wanaI 1,4(1rea rv)xoram
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I

WABX &
The University of Detroit
present
IKE & TINA
TURNER
plus WAYNE COCHRAN
and the C. C. Riders
Fri., Sept. 24-8:30 p.m.
U. of D. MEMORIAL BLDG.

I

Tickets $5.50-$4.50-$3.50 Exclusively on Liberty Records
On sale at U. of D. MEMORIAL BLDG. BOX OFFICE and all J. L.
HUDSON ticket outlets.

__ [ "-U

APPLAUSE FROM 12 CRITICS

-
IN COOPERATION WITH
the ann arbor film cooperative
PRESENTS
ON MONDAY NIGHT ONLY
the world premiere of
PAMELA AND IAN
starring Pamela Seamon and Ian Stulberg
Directed by David Greene. Made in Ann
Arbor during 1970 and 1971, Pamela and
Ian includes scenes filmed in the Nickel's
arcade, Rive Gauche, the Residential Col-
lege Auditorium, 1111 Prospect and a
chase through the streets of Ann Arbor.
PAMELA AND IAN is based on an idea of the
French New novelist, Alain Robbe-Grillet, who said,
"the characters in a film are born in the beginning (

I

I

THE GALA INAUGURAL PlIOBCTIONI

Qcy/ 9t LL ne
POWER CENTER
A ~r I e l /'rnn q Ax

*1

"Wonderful fun!
A dazzling work of
the highest rank!"
-Rex Reed, Holiday
"Runs a breath-
taking emotional
spectrum!"
Paul D. Zimmerman, Newsweek
"Extraordinary!"
-Parent's Magazine
"A rare event in
cinema!"
-Hank Werbs, Variety
"A glory:"

WOURLD PRIEIIEIREI

"A pure stone gas! A trip and a half!"
-Michael Goodwin, Rolling Stone
"Exuberant, charm, nostalgia and

BARBARA
--O
RUTH FORD
WESLEY ADDY

CELESTE
HOLM
Anf

MURIEL
-IH
MAX SHOWALTER
RUSS THACKER

humor!"
FEDERICO
FIBLLINI
"A perpetual delight!"
-Stefan Kaner, Time Magazine
9 E

-Playboy
"Another Federico
Fellini masterpiece
of imaginative
cinema!"
--Arthur Unger, Ingenue
"A lovely movie!"
--William Wolfe, Cue
"If you go to the
cinema only once
a jfee

THE GRASS HARP "

I

a' P2ielt y (llm etvC/f/C e~ail~a

fade on de noelly TRUMAN CAPOTE

4

'reeled 4 ELLIS RABB

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