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April 19, 1972 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1972-04-19

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

a

Eighty-one years of editorial freedom
Edited and managed by students at the University of Michigan

420 Maynard St., Ann Arbor, Mich.

News Phone: 764-0552

Editoriols printed in The Michigan Daily express the individual opinions of staff writers
or the editors. This must be noted in all reprints.

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 19, 1972

NIGHT EDITOR: TED STEIN

This war must stop

The following editorial, drafted by a group of
Boston area, university students, has been en-
dorsed by 13 college newspapers Across the coun-
try in response to the U.S. bombing of Hanoi
and Haiphong.
HE LATEST escalation of the war in
Southeast Asia - the bombing of
laiphong and Hanoi - renews the U.S.
ommitment to defend the threatened
rhieu government at all costs. The new
scalation is open-ended and runs the
dear risk of catastrophic confrontation
with the Soviet Union. I
The war will not go away; Nixon re-
ains committed to military victory. This
solicy must be resisted by the Ameri-
san public.
Two years ago, in an escalation of simi-
ar magnitude, American ground troops
nvaded Cambodia. Anti-war feeling co-
tlesced into a national student strike.
That strike, joined in a moment of
srisis, delivered an ultimatum to the
American government: You cannot ex-
pand the war in Asia without provoking
massive disruptions at home.
The ultimatum was successful; the in-
vading force withdrew. American stu-
dents catalyzed a national movement
that helped to save the lives of Ameri-
cans, Vietnamese, and Cambodians. The
bver-rising trajectory of the war began
Lo turn downward.
1HE CAMBODIAN precedent denied the
use of American ground troops in the
1971 invasion of Laos. In many other mo-
nents, the anti-war movement has had
similar success. We have given crucial
support to those public leaders and con-
ressmen who spoke out on the war.
We have brought thousands of Ameri-
cans to public demonstrations of opposi-
tion. And we have managed to set the
terms of debate on the war, because our
position - total and immediate U.S.
withdrawal - has been firm over the
years.
The current North Vietnamese na-
tional liberation front offensive has re-
duced the war to its essential compo-

nents. The Thieu government is mortal-
ly threatened. The U.S. has committed
itself to supporting a corrupt dictator.
The failed logic of Nixon's Vietnamiza-
tion policy can now be measured by his
newest campaign against North Vietnam.
If the Thieu government had the legiti-
macy or the strength to repel the offen-
sive, these campaigns would not be neces-
sary. How far will the United States now
go to maintain a regime that cannot
stand on its own?
The bombing of Hanoi and Haiphong
suggests that there are no limits. Nixon
has said, "all of our options are open."
We say: "All options except withdrawal
are abhorrent."
A memorandum prepared by Admiral
Thomas Moorer, chairman of the Joint
Chiefs of Staff and released last week by
Rep. Michael Harrington (D-Mass.) clari-
fies our importance as students opposed
to the war. If the United States were re-
leased from "domestic restraints," noted
the memorandum, it might undertake.
amphibious operations against the north
or bombing of the irrigation ditches in
the quest for victory.
CLEARLY, NIXON is not deterred any
longer by the risks of confrontation
with the Soviet Union. The likelihood of
bombing Soviet ships had forestalled the
bombing of Haiphong in the past. That
risk is now a reality. The only remain-
ing restraint is that imposed by the
American people. And it is our task as
students, who have come this way before,
to make sure that domestic restraints re-
main firm.
The bombing of North Vietnam and the
cancellation of the Paris Peace Talks re-
turns the war to its pre-1968 character.
The ghastly history of the war con-
verges on this moment. Joining with oth-
er college newspapers we condemn the
escalation of the war against the Vietna-
mese and support immediate demonstra-
tions of protest this week.
-THE SENIOR EDITORS

WASHINGTON - The Nixon
administration came to town on a
pledge to restore law and order to
a troubled nation. The President
promised to crack down on crim-
inals. Doubling the conviction rate,
he said, is the best way to stoic
crime.
And he said the courts would
stop coddling criminals once he
had put some distinguished con-
servatives on the Supreme Court.
Of all his campaign slogans, the
President's "law-and-order" pledge
seems most likely to return to
haunt him. The conviction rate,
which he said he would double, has
decreased drastically. Two of his
nominees for thetSupreme Court
were rejected by the Senate as un-
fit. His top crimebuster, Assist-
ant Attorney General Will Wilson,
was forced to resign because of his
cozy ties to a crooked Texas busi-
nessman.
Now the President's new nomi-
nee for Attorney General, Richard
Kleindienst, has become an em-
barrassment. His confirmation has
been held up because of his back-
stage role in the administration's
anti-trust policy toward the Inter-
national Telephone and Telegraph
conglomerate.
Now it apears the President is
in for another law-and-order em-
barrassment. A book will shortly
be published revealing Mr. Nixon's
secret role in forcing former Su-
preme Court Justice Abe Fortas
to leave the bench.
The book, entitled "A Question
of Judgment," is by Robert Sho-
gan, the respected Washington
correspondent of Newsweek. It
tells how the President himself
quietly informed key members of
Congress of a supposedly secret
meeting between Attorney Gen-
eral John Mitchell and Chief Jus-
tice Earl Warren about the Fortas
case.
Word of the Mitchell-Warren ses-
sion was promptly leaked to the
press from Capitol Hill. Fortas
was forced off the Court by the
publicity. The book makes no apol-
ogies for Fortas. But it raises still
another embarrassing question
about President Nixon's adminis-
tration of justice.
Nixon helps ITT
President Nixon dropped a signi-
ficant passage out of his latest
environmental message to Con-
gress. He had intended to forbid
the dredging and filling of wet-
lands that might spoil the ecology.,
This would have ruined a vast
multimillion-dollar development
that ITT is building on Florida's

Gr r dJ ACKANDERQ

Sparkman is receiving from bank-
ers and other friends.
Boston bankers, for example, are
submitting checks in the amount
of $99 each. They carefully keep
their donations below $100 so they
won't have to be listed in the pub-
lic campaign reports.
Another who is raking in the
green from the bankers is John
Tower of Texas, the ranking Re-
publican on the Senate &anking
Committee.
What do the bankers receive for
their gifts? Aside from favorable
legislation, they get billion! of
federal dollars deposited in their
banks, for which they pay abso-
lutely no interest. The profits on
such accounts run into millions of
dollars each year.
In a Republican administration,
most of the interest-free federal
gravy goes to GOP bank~s. Until
last year, the First City National
Bank of New York was headed by
one of Vice President Agnew's
closest friends, Republican fat cat
George Mogre.
In 1970, Moore's bank had well
over $300 million in federal de-
posits.
Harold Helm, a big GOP boost-
er, is executive committee chair-
man of the Chemical Bank in New
York City. Last year, Helm's bank
had $40 million in Internal Rev-
enue Service accounts. And the list
goes on.
The beleaguered taxpayer some-
times has to take out loans to pay
his taxes. He borrows his own
money, in effect, at the highest
interest rates the market will bear.

°,.>..

John Sparkman

Abe Fortas

east coast.
An ITT subsidiary, Florida Palm
Coast, has bought up 100,000 acres
of swampland and scrub timber-
land. The bulldozers are already
mowing down the trees, and steam
shovels and dredgers are building
a maze of canals to drain the low-
lands.
ITT has virtually taken o v e .
tiny Flagler County, now a slefpy
rural area, and is preparing to
turn it into a cosmopolitan city of
750,000 people.
Harold Geneen, ITT's high-paid,
high-powered president, called on
Maurice Stans before he resigned
as Secretary of Commerce to raise
money for President Nixon's re-
election campaign. Geneen easily
persuaded Stans that the prohibi-
tion against draining natural wet-
lands would hurt his development.
The Commerce Department im-
mediately opposed the drainage
prohibition as a hardship on de-
velopers, and President N i x o n
obligingly dropped it from his en-
vironment message.
Nixon's disappointment
President Nixon is deeply dis-
appointed over his failure to per-
suade Hanoi, through the Chinese,
to call off their offensive. He ad
urged Chinese Premier Chou Fn-
lai to use his influence in Hanoi to
stop the bloodshed.
Nixon had argued that now is
the best time to work out a peace-
ful settlement. After the Ameri-
can election in November, ne ar-
gued, he would be free of politial
pressure and would be inclined to
take a tougher position. Before
the United States sent B52s to

bomb Hanoi, he offered to resume
secret negotiations at once to
bring peace to Vietnam if the
Chinese could arrange it.
The President privately believ-
es that the North Vietnamese went
ahead with the offensive in spite
of the advice from Peking. Some
insiders believe the President's ar-
gument about becoming tougher
after November may have helped
to stimulate the offensive.
Bankers' pay-off
I am often asked about the me-
chanics of fixes and pay-offs in
high places. Many people, it
seems, have visions of trench-coat-
ed bagmen meeting in parks and

John Tower
bus terminals and furtively ex-
changing identical brief cases.
It rarely happens that way. The
typical pay-off involves a care-
fully concealed campaign contri-
bution or similar complicaed fin-
ancial arrangement. Most are so
complex that the average person
might have trouble unscrambling
them. For example, here's how
the bankers work.
Senator John Sparkman, the Ala-
bama Democrat, heads the Sen-
ate Banking Committee. Three
campaign committees have al-
ready been set up, in Washington
to receive the flood of dollars

President Nixon meets Chou En-lai

RECORD

RECORD

Filed

19

J

Balot No.
Mailed 19
Retumed 19-
Clerk.

Received Ballots Herein Described
19 _
(Chairman Board of Election inspectors)

Filed

Ballot No.
Mailed 19

19___.

Received Ballots Herein Described
(Chairman Board of Election inspectors)

4

Returned -

"t /

(Ward)

(Precinct)

Clerk.

(Word)

(Precinct)

Application for Absent Voters Ballot
FOR THE PRESIDENTIA L PRIMARY ELECTION
TO BE HELD ON MAY 16, 1972
, a duly qualified and registered

1

elector of the Ward Precinct of the
(Give number of Ward and Precinct if more than one)

(Township, Village or City)

in the County of

and

(Nome of Township, Village, or City)

State of Michigan, hereby make application for an official ballot, or ballots, to be
voted by me at such election.
THE'STATUTORY GROUNDS ON WHICH I BASE MY REQUEST ARE: (Check Applicable Reason)
[} I expect to be absent from the community in which I am registered for the entire time the polls are
open on election day.
n I am physically unable to attend the polls without the assistance of another.
F I cannot attend the polls because of the tenets of my religion.
I' I have been appointed an election precinct inspector in a precinct other than the precinct where
I reside.
17 I am 65 years of age or older.

Primar elections.
Do it absentee
THOUSANDS OF University students are registered to vote
in Ann Arbor. If you are one of them, and you will be
unable to go to the polls for either the May 16 presidential pri-
mary or the August 8 primary you can vote by absentee ballot.
Candidates for county sheriff, U.S. Senate, Congress,
state representative, county commissioners and prosecutor
and circuit court judges-they will all be picked on August 8.
The rules are strict, but it's still easy. To apply for an
absentee ballot for either or both elections fill out one or both
forms appearing on this page. Fill in your name, ward and
precinct in the middle part of the form and check the reason
why you are requesting an absentee ballot.,
Fill in your summer address and your official voter regis-
tration address. Date it and sign it.
Don't fill out the very top part and on the bottom part
only sign it and fill in your voting address. Cut it out carefully
and you're almost home free.
TO APPLY for a ballot for the May 16 presidential pri-
mary, mail the form to the city clerk and his office will send
you an absentee ballot before the election.
But to vote in the August primary you can't turn in your
application until 75 days before the election. So bring your
,form to The Daily or the Student Government Council offices.
It will be stored and then turned in on May 25. The city clerk
will mail you a ballot.
If you want to vote in the June school board election you
have to get another form; it's available at the city clerk's
office and at SGC.

Application for Absent Voters Ballot
FOR THE GENERAL STATE PRIMARY ELECTION
TO BE HELD ON AUGUST 8, 1972

1, -_

of

in the County of _

and

elector of the ___ Ward Precinct of the
(Give number of Ward and Precinct if more than one)

-a duly qualified and registered

(Name of Township, Village or City)

State of Michigan, hereby make application for an official ballot, or ballots, to be
voted by me at such election.
THE STATUTORY GROUNDS ON WHICH I BASE MY REQUEST ARE: (Check Applicable Reason)
-1 I expect to be absent from the community in which I am registered for the entire time the polls are
open on election day.
rF I am physically unable to attend the polls without the assistance of another.
F, I cannot attend the polls because of the tenets of my religion.
-I I have been appointed on election precinct inspector in a precinct other than the precinct where
I reside.
Fn I am 65 years of age or older.

(Township, Village or City)

Send "Absent Voter's Ballot" to me at

Send "Absent Voter's Ballot" to me at

(Number)

Street)

(Number)

Street)

City
My registered address is

State.

Zip

City
My registered address is

State

Zip

(Number)

(Street)

(Number)

(Street)

(I hereby declare the foregoing statements to be true)

(I hereby declare the foregoing statements to be true)

X_

Date

X

(Signature of Absent Voter)
WARNING: Any person making a false statement in this declaration upon conviction shall be guilty of a
misdemeanor.
INSTRUCTIONS: You must sign in TWO places (X). Do not detach Poll List Coupon
from application.

(Signature of Absent Voter)

WARNING: Any person making a false statement in this declaration upon conviction shall be guilty of w
misdemeanor.
INSTRUCTIONS: You must sign in TWO places (X). Do not detach Poll List Coupon
from application.
=U > >U<=> =>1> ?) ):<= s>0<=>t;O Got)G(> <: 04=>() 04G. " O

Application to Vote-Poll List
(Absent Voter)
DATE OF ELECTION: MAY 16, 1972

Voter No._
Ward_
Precinct

Application to Vote-Poll List
(Absent Voter)

Voter No.
Ward
Precinct

THAT'S IT.
Use the power. Vote.

DATE OF ELECTION: AUGUST 8, 1972

Ihereby certify that I am a registered and qualified elector in the above ward
and precinct and hereby make application to vote at this election.
(Write your name here just as it appears in the Registration Book)

I hereby certify that I am a registered and qualified elector in the above ward,
and precinct and hereby make application to vote at this election.
(Write your name here just as it appears in the Registration Book)

~7 U ~ ~

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