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April 19, 1972 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1972-04-19

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

"A MASTERPIECE!"
-PAUL D. ZIMMERMAN, Newsweek
WINNER OF 2 ACADEMY AWARDS!
Plus Oscar-Winning Cartoon
"The Crunch Bird"
231 S. State St.
7 m FEATURE
AT
,3, 5 7
& 9P.M.
Dial 662-6264
SHOW F:-
R __

NEWS PHONE: 764-0542
BUSINESS PHONE: 764-0554

C14 r

Sfri i n

a t 14

page three

Ann Arbor, Michigan Wednesday, April 19, 1972

TODAY
Residential College
Open Hearing
to discuss the RC Review Report

neWs brief s
by The Associated Press
THE ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY, (EPA) in
its first test of a tough new antipollution provision, has ordered
an electric power plant to switch to low-sulfur fuel within 12
days.
William Ruckelshaus, an EPA administrator, issued the order
Monday, requiring the Delmarva Power and Light Co. at Delaware;
City, Del., to comply with federal air-quality standards as set down
in the 1970 Clean Air Act.
Heavily affected by the order is the large Getty Oil Co., which
both supplies the high-sulfur fuel now used by the plant and uses
its electricity and process steam for a nearby Getty refinery.
A Delmarva spokesman said compliance with the order would
cost about $2.5 million a year, which would be passed along auto-;
matically in charges to customers. Getty has estimated the switch
would cost it some $10,000 a. day.{
COMMUNIST-CONTROLLED UNIONS, representing over halfI
the labor force in Uruguay, yesterday began a two-day general
strike, as the party buried seven of its members killed in a
Sbattle with police.
A gun fight at a Communist Party district headquarters broke PresidentrNixon yesterda
out Monday when the government claimed Tupamaro guerrillas, Rose Garden.
against whom it is waging war, took refuge in the building._
Congress Saturday suspended all civil rights and declared a state' 4-3 DECIS ON:
of "internal war" after the Tupamaros assassinated two policemen, !
a navy captain and a former undersecretary of the interior Friday
t morning. * * uprem

Flanganto
testif in
ITT study
WASHINGTON 1P) - White
House aide Peter Flanigan
agreed yesterday to testify be-
fore the Senate Judiciary
Committee and cleared away
a major roadblock holding up
the confirmation of Richard
G. Kleindienst as attorney
general.
Flanigan said he would testify
only in limited fashion on what
he knows about the out-of-court
settlement last summer of three
antitrust suits filed by the govern-
ment against Intrenational Tele-
phone & Telegraph Corp.
In a letter to Sen. Sam J. Er-
vin (D-N.C.), Flanigan said he
would talk willingly about how he,
arranged for eparation of a key
financial analysis which Justice
Department officials say played a
major role in their decision not to
carry the ITT cases to the Su-,
preme Court.
Former Asst. Atty. Gen. Richard.
McLaren testified the study FRani-
gan arranged for, written by New
York investment banker Richard
Ramsden, played a central role in
what until last July had been a
determined effort to carry the ITT
cases to the Supreme Court.
According to Executive privilege
Flanigan cannot be forced to tes-
tify. Conversations and letters be-
tween the President and his aides

2553 LSA Bldg.
(Regents Room)

3-5 p.m.

-Associated Press
Presidential greeting
ay welcomes members of China's table tennis team in the White 'House

All members of LSA and RC

are invited!

I

A POLITICAL CLASH RESULTED yesterday from the leak[
of secret papers dealing with Chancellor Willy Brandt's treaty
negotiations with the Soviet Union.
The alleged excerpts from the papers concern the Bonn-Moscow
talks that led to Brandt's 1970 treaty with the Russians renouncing
he use of force and recognizing German territorial losses in World
War II.
Lawmakers who oppose Brandt in an upcoming election have
seized the issue and claim the papers create the impression Brandt
gave away too many bargaining points and hurt the chances for
eventual German reunification.
Brandt's nonagression treaties with Moscow and Warsaw are a
key issue in the state election Sunday, and the winning party will

loyalty

ie Court rules Mass.
pledge constitutional

WASHINGTON 0P) - The Su-
preme Court, led by Chief Justice
Warren Burger, has approved a
Massachusetts loyalty oath that
requires public employes to pledge
to oppose the overthrow of the4
government.
"We are not charged with cor-
recting grammar but with enforc-

be able to influence the treaties' chances of ratification in early May. ing a Constitution," Burger said
* 4yesterday in delivering a 4-3 deci-
THE IRISH REPUBLICAN ARMY (IRA) yesterday buried a so htteot~snttovge
slain commander in one of the biggest funeral marches ever seenItormionhebks
About 10,000 mourners lined the two-mile funeral march route, The decision reverses a panel of
paying their last respects to Joseph McCann, commander of the 1st threefderaljudges ineBstonw
Belfast Brigade of the IRA'a Marxist-oriented Official wing. literalistic approach" and declared
The fatal shooting of McCann by British paratroopers Saturday the oath invalid in 1969.
touched off a wave of gun battles in which four people died and 26
others were wounded. Justices William Douglas, Wil-
-*liam Brennan Jr. and Thurgood
Marshall found the oath in con-
MICHIGAN'S SUPREME COURT has granted leave to appeal flict with the free-speech guaran-!
in the Regents case against the Michigan Relations Commission tees of ,the First Amendment and
EN d nnAh Uh i it I t nd R sidents Association. dissented.

Burger recalled the observation
recently departed colleague,
stice John Harlan, that "almost
y word or phrase may be ren-
red vague and ambiguous by
;section with a semantic scal-
,1
The decision represents success
Burger in swinging the court
ound on the subject. During the
st decade the court more often
an not has struck down loyalty
hs. And two years ago, when a
assachusetts oath was before the
urt in a preliminary case, only
irger and Harlan spoke up for it.
Justice Harry Blackmun, not
iexpectedly, sided with Burger in
sterday's decision. What made
e difference was that they were
ned by Justices Potter Stewart
d Byron White, the court's
piddle men."
Justices Lewis Powell Jr., and
illiam Rehnquist, recent ap-
intments of President Nixon, did
t participate because the case
s argued before they joined the
urt.
The Massachusetts oath was
allenged by Lucretia Richard-
n. She was fired from her job
a sociologist at a Boston mental
spital in 1968 because she re-
sed to take the oath.'
Concerning the thrust of the
th, Burger maintains it only re-
ires that government workers
BOX OFFICE OPEN AT 7:00
SHOW STARTS AT DUSK

fore the court. can be kept from the public under
All public employes in the state the constitution'al separation of
are - automatically discharged if powers among the three branches
they refuse to take the oath. of government.
Guidance problem solved;
Apollo 16 still moonbound

commit themselves not to use il-
legal force. In this respect, he said,
the oath is like the ones taken by
Presidents, members of Congress,
and even lawyers who practice be-

(I uv Cx) ana oeuniversit yinterns ana neaie mnbual.
The action allows both MERC and the Interns and Residents
Association to have their case heard by the state Supreme Court.

F,

,1

and WCBN
PRESEN T

poi
The Michigan Daily, edited and man- no
aged by students at the University ofa
wa
Class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Mich- coU
igan. 420 Maynard St., Ann Arbor,j
Michigan 48104. Published daily Tues- cha
day through Sunday morning Univer-
sity year. Subscription rates:1 by son
carrier, $11 by mail. as:
Summer Session published Tuesday ho
through Saturday morning. Subscrip- fuS
tion rates: $5.50 by carrier (campus
area); $6.50 local mail (in Mich. or C
Oh.o); $7.50 non-local mail (other states oa
and foreign). qu:

SPACE CENTER, Houston (W)
- Apollo 16 astronauts heading
toward a moon landing worked
with ground controllers yester-
day and overcame a guidance
problem that briefly froze their
spaceship in one position.
Systems worked out at Mis-
sion Control were promptly put
into effect by the spacemen to
correct the deficiency.
Officials attributed the guid-
ance problem to an errant elec-
trical surge, which confused a
spaceship computer early yes-
terday and caused it to send
commands which locked the
guidance system. This, in ef-
fect, wiped out the basic refer-
ence needed by the spacecraft
to locate and steer itself in
space.
Flight Controller Phil Shaffer
said a computer program w a s

being developed which would
instruct the on board computer
to ignore such electronic signals
in the future. -
The astronauts were in no
danger from the guidance prob-
lem because the spatecraft has
a, backup system. However, if
the primary system could nat
have been repaired the m oGo n
landing would have been can-
celed.
With the guidance problem sol
ved, the command ship Casper
and its lunar lander Orion, will
hurtle around the moon this af-
ternoon and the astronauts will
fire a long rocket burst to settle
the spacecraft into lunar orbit.
Astronauts John Young and
Charles Duke Jr. will guide Or-
ion to a landing on a plateau,
high in the southern mountains
of the moon tomorrow.

I

A WEEKEND OF GOLDEN MEMORIES
8 p.m. Friday, April 21 to 8 p.m. Saturday, April 22
Solid Gold on WCBN AM & FM
AND THEN
8 p.m.-SATURDAY, April 22
II Campus Sock Hop
UNION BALLROOM
WITH
& The Javelins Chastity & The Belts

I.

m".

F

This program not recommended for pre-teens
NOW! Shown 7:30 & 10:55 Plus at 9:20
SHELLY WINTERS
"WHO SLEW
AUNTIE ROOT

P

---sea

HILLEL STUDENT ELECTIONS

OII
$2.50 PER CARLOAD 3 HORRORIFIC HITS
"BEWARE OF 1. "I Drink Your
Blood"
THE BRETHREN" 2. "I Eat Your Skin"
3. "Sweet Baby
PLUS Charlie"
"WILLARD" Program Rated R
.~ ..

-CANDIDATES-
PRESIDENT:
Ben Romer, Howard Lederman
VICE-PRESIDENTS:
Brad Londy, Gary Huber
ALLINTERESTED STUDENTS
ARE ELIGIBLE TOs VOTE
Ballots may be obtained at Hillel, 1429 Hill
before Monday, April 24, 5 p.m.

r

Prizes-FREE Admission

NIGHTLY
AT
7:00-9:15

-S..

MATINEES
Wed., Sat., Sun.
1:00-3:15

They used every passion in their incredible duel!

The Last Grad Coffee Hour
of the semester
Could Be A Beginning
For You
Come On
WED.,.APRIL 10
8-10 P.M.
4th Floor Rackham
LEMONADE AND COOKIES FOR ALL
Students and University Community
Summer Study/Travel Abroad
EARN UP TO 12 HOURS CREDIT

I

GRAD STUDENTS-SPECIAL INTENSIVEI
" LONDON 0 PARIS
" VIENNA 0 ISRAEL

LANGUAGE COURSES
* SPAIN
t ITALY

U E~- -.'---.- - - - - -------* -

I lI

nrr. A R

I ..." "A w...... w . 1 1, 1,040 2 A 04 r- ln-r - - sA_--

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