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April 16, 1972 - Image 8

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The Michigan Daily, 1972-04-16

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Rage Eight

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Sunday, April 16, 1972

Page Eight THE MICHIGAN DAILY Sunday, April 16, 1972

PONTIAC ADJUSTS
Busing reaches acceptance

Motor City goes wild over Wallace

(Continued from Page 1)
Of course, not all the students
think the picture is so rosy. One
group of whites I spoke to com-
plained that the administration
punishes white students for in-
fractions that black students can
get away with: This group of stu-
dents told me that whites and
blacks were not getting along.
"The blacks are too bossy and they
want to fight too much," they said.
"A lot of whites are getting tired
of taking it and are about to
fight," one member of the group
said threateningly.
However, according to other stu-
dents and teachers I spoke to, this
attitude is not prevalent. "You
won't find ten to fifteen kids in

this school that will say that
blacks and whites don't get along,",
a black teacher said.
A white teacher agreed that
hose students who don't want to4
get along stand out as exceptions.
The atmosphere at Jefferson has
spurred the development of the
Jeffersonians, a club made up of
white and black students who seek
to show parents and students in
other schools that blacks and
whites can get along and that bus-
ing can work to the benefit of all
involved.
The Jeffersonians, whose motto is
"We can make it work," have pre-
sented assembly programs to ele-
mentary school children through-

out the city, encouraging them to
work together to make the bus-
ing program a success. The club
has also sent panels of students to
civic organization meetings, try-
ing to convince parents that bus-
ing is working out well.
These students are actually ex-
cited about busing. "Busing is
good," one black girl told me, "be-
cause you can make more friends
and learn things about people you
never knew about before. You get
educated more, too, because the
other person might know some-
thing that you didn't know."
"Without busing," the girl con-
tinued, "you wouldn't meet any-
one new."
According to Lee, the Jefferson-
ians have had "a very positive ef-
fect. The club has helped set up
a rapport with the white com-
munity."
"I think a lot of new friend-
ships have been built up as a re-
sult of integration this year," Pa-
terra said. "This age group - they
just accept these things; racial
differences are just not important
to them."

(Continued from Page 1)
them in between his forty stand-
ing ovations.
"I'm gonna send a message," he
said, "to the limousine liberals ...
the pseudo intellectuals who think
they got more brains than you .. .
and the bunch of despots on the
federal district benches who turn
loose every criminal they can
find."
The governor's speech went like
this
"Billions of dollars are going
down the drain to people on wel-
fare who aren't entitled to it."
Prolonged applause and shouts
of "right on!"
"The best way to guarantee
peace is to be so strong that they
(the Communists) will only want
to negotiate with you, and that's
all."
Prolonged applause.
"The working man shouldn't
have to borrow money to pay his
taxes.'
Prolonged applause.
And so on, for an hour, as the
sweat poured off his head and the
cameras' shutters shuttered and
nervous secret servicemen wiped
their brows with kleenex.
Wallace drew so many people
that after emptying the auditor-

ium of one group of semi-hysteri-
cal fans shortly before 9 p.m., his
campaign managers promptly fill-
ed it again with those still wait-
ing outside.
Even then there were hundreds
of people who didn't make it in-
side, including several dozen slo-
gan-shouting members of Youth
Against War and Fascism, who
were protesting Wallace's speech.
Confusion around the state fair-
grounds was heightened by a com-
peting rodeo in another stadium.
Wallace began his first day of
campaigning with a press con-
ference at a downtown hotel. Dur-
ing the conference he told the
media much of what he later re-
peated to his evening audience.
Stressing the issues of taxes
and school busing, Wallace point-
ed to his own state of Alabama,
"where you can go into a school
and come out alive . . . and you
don't have to carry sidearms."
He told reporters that property
tax on a $10,000 home in Ala-
bama was only $40 a year, and
claimed that Alabama provided

"quality education for everyone."
Wallace then introduced two
rank and file union members who
ceremonially presented the gov-
ernor with several hundred dol-
lars in campaign contributions
and gave short speeches denounc-
ing the "UAW leadership," which
in Michigan, at least, seems to
favor either Senator Edmund
Muskie or Senator Hubert Hum-
phrey.
A large crowd of Wallace sup-
porters - many of them bedecked
in the by now familiar red white
and blue of the governor's cam-
paign - stood outside the confer-
ence room and listened to the
press conference on loudspeakers.
They could be heard punctuating
the governor's remarks with loud
roars of approval.
Following the conclusion of the
press conference, Wallace took
time to shake hands with mem-
bers of the press corps and his
supporters outside before leaving
in a Secret Service limousine for
his headquarters at the Metropoli-

tan Airport Holiday Inn.
Security arrangements w e r e
tight for Wallaces' day in the mo-
tor city. His normally large en-
tourage of agents of the Secret
Service was augmented by a con-
tingent of Detroit police and
Wayne County Sheriff's deputies.
CLARIFICATION
A story in yesterday's Daily
reported that Elaine Reuben, aI
candidate for the Office of Stu-
dent Services vice presidency
was never officially told by
President Fleming that she was
being considered for the post.
In fact, Reuben was inter-
viewed as a candidate by Flem-
ing, as were all four candidates
whose names were submitted to
him by a search committee.
Reuben's interview, however
took place before Fleming was
notified that she was one of
the four recommended candi-
dates.

Campus welcomes
Chinese visitors

(Continued from Page 1)
Although there was some minor
scuffling during the demonstra-
tion, no major incidents occurred.
McIntire, .however, was pushed
back by police as he tried to hold
his picket sign over the arena rail-
ing as the Chinese ping pong team
arrived in buses.
Threatened with arrest, McIn-
tire returned to his original posi-
tion. No arrest was made.
"They told me they didn't want
the team to see my signs," Mc-
Intire said. "The right of dissent
is precious in this country, but the
State Department is trying to
crush all dissent."
McIntire was met with much
heckling as students poured out
of the arena after the match. Yells
of "What's your position on the
egg roll?" and "How much Chiang
Kai-Shek paying you?" greeted
him.

Amid all the banners, welcom-
ing speeches and protest demon-
strations, the visiting Chinese
really got little chance to meet
with average University students.
Only during their lunch break
at Bursley and before the game at
Crisler Arena did they find time
to chat.
Despite the security agents' ef-
forts to keep Bursley residents on
one half of the dining room, gawk-
ing at the Chinese on the other
half, the students finally worked
their way over until they were
grouped around one table of Chi-
nese players, asking and answer-
ing questions.
The Chinese ate mostly salads
and fruit at their Bursley meal,
telling the students that they were
gradually getting used to the food,
to which one Bursleyite respond-
ed, "So are we."

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THE
GOOD
PEOPLE:
(This partial listing of the
Harvard Summer School
faculty, 1972 session, indi-
cates the calibr- of teachers
in the program and the
range of fields from which
they are drawn.)
George W. Albee
Psychology, University of
Vermont
Negussie Ayele
Political Science, Haile Selassie
University
Bethany Beardslee
Soprano
Wilson B. Bishal
Arabic, Harvard
Haskell M. Block
Comparative Literature,
City University of New York
H. Brochier
Economics, Sorbonne
Jean Bruneau
Comparative Literature, Harvard
R. H. Chapman
English, Harvard
Marshall Cohen
Philosophy, City University
of New York
Maurice Cranston
Political Science,
London School of Economics
Robert Creeley
English, State University of
Nev .ork at Buffalo
Darn~ Della Terza
Roman ce Languages, Harvard
Jacques Dofny
Sociology, University of
Montreal
Hormoz Farhat
Music, University of Tehran
Donald A. Gibbs
Chinese, Harvard
Owen Gingench
Astronomy, Harvard
Amos Vogel
Film
THE
GOOD
BOOK:
1972 Harvard Summer School
Course Guide
For a copy, send coupRto~
Department SS27 ,._ t1
1350 Massachus2t ve.'"
Cambridge, Mass. 02138"j -
Name
Street
City
State_ .__Zip
HARVARD SUMMER SCHOOL

#-i

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN,

BE YOUR OWN LANDLORD
THIS SUMMER!
LIVE IN A CO-OP

B 52s STRIKE
Massive bombing raid
sears city of Haiphong

SUNDAY, APRIL 16
TV Center Film: "Worlds of Abra-
ham Kaplan," "Loneliness," WWJ-TV,
Channel 4, noon.
Carillon Recital: F. P. Price, Burton
Mem. Tower, 1 p.m.
Music School: A. Ferrari, piano, Sch.
of Mus. Recital Hall, 2:30 p.m.
Music School: Opera W~orkshop,
Rackham Aud., 4:30 p.m.
Music School: D. Blumenthal, piano,
Sch. of Mus. Recital Hall, 4:30 p.m.
Music Society : New York Pro Musica,
Power Center, 8 p.m.
Music School: D. Brown, percussion,
Sch. of Mus. Recital Hall, 8 p.m.
MONDAY, APRIL 17
Mathematics Lecture: M. Ross, "Ecol-
ogy," 2225 Angell Hall, 2 p.m.
Senate Assembly: Rackham Amph.,
3:15 p.m.
Music School: C. Tubbs, French horn,
Sch, of Music Recital Hall, 5 p.m.
Physics Seminar: L. Jones, "Report
on the 4th International Conf. on High
IEnergy Collisions at Oxford," P&A Co1-
loq. Rm., 4 p.m.
Computer & Comm. Sci. - Joint
MSU-UM Colloq: E. Feigenbaum,
"Problems of Solving Programs - A
Case Study," Chrysler Ctr. Aud., 7:45
p.m.
Music School: D. Ehrlich, viala, Sch.
of Mus. Recital Hall, 8 p.m.
SUMMER PLACEMENT
April 13, 1972
Interview:
Camp Maplehurst, Michigan Coed."
Will interview Tues., April 18, 9:30 to
12:00, waterfront (WSI), arts & crafts,
riding (western), scuba instr. (certi-
fied), sailing, bus driver, general coun-
selors. Register by phone 763-4117.
Announcement:
YW-YMCA, Camp Algonquian, Mich.
Coed. Following openings still avail-
able: archery instr., riflery (21), sailing,
tripper (21) M ando F. Pick up applica-
- - - . - - --

tion at 350 So. Fifth Avenue at desk.
SUMMER PLACEMENT
212 S.A.B.
Interview:
Good Humor Corp., Detroit. Will in-
terview Fri., Apr. 21, 9-5; return visit -
your last opportunity for big money
this summer for the Detroit suburbf
area. Register for interview 763-4117.
- -- -

Good food, good company,

reasonable rates,

SUMMER
SUBLET
The Heritage House
829 Tappan
Apt. 404
" DISHWASHER
" TWO AIR CONDITIONERS
U TWONBALCONIES
" LAUNDRY FACILITIES
" SOUNDPROOF
769-6855

free washing machines, singles available
ON CENTRAL CAMPUS
Approximately $42 member/month-
approx. $5011guaranteed single/month
Plus food costs approximately $32/month
NORTH CAMPUS-
Approximately $70 member month room & board
and guaranteed singles.
INQUIRE:
INTERCOOPERATIVE COUNCIL
Room 3N, Michigan Union
662-4414

*

v

(Continued from Page 1)
South Vietnamese defenses are
greatly endangered around An
Loc, correspondents reported yes-
terday. "It looks pretty grim,"
said one U.S. military official.
The infantry division dispatch-
ed to provide relief to troops de-
fending the city, has given up
trying to move towards the pro-
vincial capital along Highway 13,
and is now engaged in fighting
along its flanks.
Meanwhile, Viet Cong troops
have reportedly attacked ARVN
troops at Chon Thanh, 37 miles
north of Saigon. The column's
closest penetration to An Loc had
been about 12 miles.
Twenty American aircraft were
TOp part)
speak at D
(Continued from Page 1)
Muskie did not use a prepared
speech, concentrating instead on
the intense fighting in Vietnam.
In a speech colored with home-
spun anecdotes about his mother
and his childhood, Sen. Muskie
avoided issues within the Demo-
cratic Party. Instead, he attacked
President Richard Nixon's failure
to end the war in Vietnam as "a
terrible lack of leadership."
He touched briefly on his dis-
appointing performance in the
New Hampshire and Wisconsin
primaries, and made an oblique
reference to Gov. George Wallace
of Alabama as "a visitor who has
moved in down the street."
Humphrey arrived late for the
dinner, and began his speech by
announncing that "three hours

damaged, and scores of persons
injured in rocket and mortar at-
tacks on South Vietnam's two
largest cities, Saigon and Da
Nang.
And forces of the Army of
South Vietnam (ARVN) were
routed from a fire base in the cen-
tral highlands while pressure
mounted on the key Firebase Bas-
togne, one of the most important
defenses of Hue. _
The rocket attacks on Saigon,
Da Nang and the Biuh Thuy air-
field in the Mekong Delta killed
close to 60 South Vietnamese, ac-
cording to U.S. sources. One
American was killed and 28
wounded in the attacks, U.S.
sources said.
regulars
emo dinner
ago I was in Alabama'. He also
attacked Wallace, and Nixon, for
trying to prevent the nation from
progressing, "one by scaring us
to death, the other by just boring1
us to death."

I

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fle p

Your Brother!
Draft

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Prepare now for training
sessions in May. After
the training program,
counsel one two-hour ses-
sion per week.
IF INTERESTED,
COME IN TO
ANN ARBOR
DRAFT COUNSELING
CENTER
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ri

r---° ------

WHY CART ALL THOSE CLOTHES HOME?
Greene's way
makes going home
a cinch.

a'

I

TV & Stereo Rentals
$10.00 per month
1,4O DEPOSIT
FREE DELIVERY, PICK UP
AND SERVICE
CALL:
NEJAC TV RENTALS
662-5671

JUST' CALL GREENE'S

for one of our

fabulous

Handi-Hampers storage boxes. Pack all the clothes
you won't wear until fall-Clothes you would ordi-
narily pack up, take home, have cleaned, pack up
again and bring back in the fall.
NOW, ALL YOU NEED TO DO is turn the Hamper

Had it up to here with elections? We don't blame you.
But before you turn yourself off completely, consider PERRY BULLARD, a candi-
date for State Representative from Ann Arbor. Perry Bullard thinks human priorities should
be made relevant to politics. He's worth getting excited about.

over to Greene's.

They c I e a n the lot at regular

For The Student Body:
LEVI'S
Corduroy.
Bells

cleaning prices and store it in a refrigerator moth-
proof vault. When you return in the fall, call
Greene's again, your clothes will be taken out of the
vault, returned to you freshly pressed on hangers
and packed in neat polyethylene bags, ready for
your clothes closet.
PRICE? $4.95 plus regular cleaning and pressing
prices-includes $250.00 insurance.
Call NOrmandy 22543 or Stop at
any Greene's Plant for Information

He was active in the Ann Arbor Tenants Union, Vietnam Veterans
Against the War, the Public Interest Research Group in Michigan, and
formerly on the Executive Board of the Washtenaw County American
Civil Liberties Union.
1. Repeal of abortion laws and all victimless crime laws.
2. Rent control to reduce landlord profits and to encourage widespread
establishment of cooperatively owned housing.

'6 Increased University appropriations specifically earmarked for
women and minority groups.

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