100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

January 20, 1972 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1972-01-20

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page Eight

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Thursday, January 20, 1972

Page Eight THE MICHIGAN DAILY Thursday, January 20, 1972

WELFARE, EDUCATION COSTS UP

State
LANSING, Mich. (A) - Record
spending levels of more than $1
billion for education and nearly
$600 million for welfare highlight
Gov. William Milliken's $2.27-
billion budget proposal for the fis-
cal year starting July 1.
No new taxes are proposed in
the fiscal year, although Milliken
is pushing a two-cent per gallon
increase in the state gasoline tax

budget
for roadbuilding and establish-
ment of an urban transportation
fund.
The budget articipates a surplus
of $11.7 million at the end of the
fiscal year in mid-1973, based on
state revenue estimates.
The proposals for school aid,
higher education and the Depart-
ment of Education are up a total
of some $81 million from current
appropriations.

hiked $224

Welfare, the controversial issue
that dragged out the completion
of the current budget until De-
cember, is earmarked for a boost
of some $75 million over the cur-
rent year's level.
The main increases were for
public and mental health, correc-
tions, natural resources and edu-
cation, as well:as welfare.
In addition, some $92 million

MILLIKEN PLAN:
State funding hike would aid 'U'

(Continued from Page 1)
costs, primarily earmarked for the
literary college, which the execu-
tive budget bureau characterized
as being "designed to ameliorate
cumulative problems of obsoles-
cence in the college's facilities and
equipment;
-$500,000. "Enrollment mix-
cost increases." This is related to
the governor's budget policy of
limiting total enrollment, while at
the same time, emphasizing grad-
uate, professional and other pro-
grams which are unique to the
University. This tends to increase
enrollment somewhat in the Na-
Milliken hikes
a ro riations
(Continued from Page 1)
levels at three-fourths of one per
cent of the operating budgets of
the state's schools.
Thus, the proposed allocation
for University student aid-$926,-
000 - fell short of the University's
request for $2.5 million to meet
its commitment for student sup-
port.
Smith said he would "discount
the possibility" of a tuition in-
crease - "except for the problem
of funding student aid." The
funds, however, could be restored
when the Legislature considers the
recommendation or through re-
allocation of University monies,
Smith said.,
The Legislature will begin tackl-
ing the University's appropriation'
in mid-February when adminis-
trators meet with representatives
of the, state's Legislative Fiscal
Agency. Final approval of the ap-
propriations bill is expected in
May or June - well ahead of the
dragged-out timetable under which
this year's bill was worked out.
It is quite possible the Legisla-
ture may shave the recommended
appropriation down when it con-
siders the proposal - particularly
, since the governor's recommenda-
tion was larger than those of re-
cent years.
The University's percentage in-
crease this year equaled that of
Michigan State University - fol-
lowing a year in which the Uni-
versity received the smallest in-
crease percentage-wise among the
state's universities and colleges.
Community colleges, a top state'
funding priority in past years, re-
ceived a smaller percentage in-
crease' this time around.

tural Resources, Architecture and
Design, and Business Administra-
tion schools and the health sci-
ence areas-most of which have
a higher cost per student than the
"average" course of study; and
-$926,000. Student financial
aid programs.
But while these programs al-
ready total $9.5 million, Univer-
sity officials are quick to point
out that their needs go beyond
these programs.
For example, Allan Smith, vice
president for financial affairs, says
the University may be forced to
expend about $640,000 if the De-
troit Edison Company is granted
a rate increase for its electrical
service.
In addition, Smith says that
the University must spend about
$250,000 for acquisition of books
and materials for the Ann Arbor
campus' libraries - an'allocation
Smith has long termed "a top
priority."
Then too, University officials
says that they need an addition-
al $1.9 million for student finan-
cial aid. This is largely to meet
enrollment quotas for minority
students which were accepted by
the University after the Black
Action Movement (BAM) class
strike in spring 1970.
It is primarily this need for ad-
ditional student aid funds that
Smaynecessitate a tuition increase
this spring, Smith says.
It is highly probable, however,
that student aid funding for the
University may be increased
above the governor's proposal by
either a House or Senate com-
mittee. Traditionally, these com-
mittees have attempted to make
minor adjustments in appropria-
tion figures to make them more

relevant to the needs of the in-
dividual institution.
In the case of student aid, the
University figure was arrived at
by applying a formula that was
used for all state universities. The
figure was simply an amount
equal to three-quarters of one per
cent of the University's general
fund budget.
Due to the BAM strike, how-
ever, the University has a com-
mitment to student aid that far
outstrips that of mostother state.
universities. Thus, it is likely that
the University's allocation for stu-
dent aid will be adjusted upward
accordingly.
In addition to the general fund
allocation p r o p o s a 1, Milliken
recommended about $5 million for
capital outlay expenditures by the
University during the coming fis-
cal year.
The recommendation, if ap-
proved by the Legislature, would
allow the Universityy to start work
on four major building projects,
including a new architecture and
design school and a "water re-
sources laboratory" to be used by,
the engineering college.
On the whole, the University
financial scene looks quite a bit
healthier than it did one year
ago.
Although austerity measures are
continuing throughout the current
academic year, Milliken's pro-j
posal makes prospects for the fu-
ture look brighter.
Last year, inadequate state
funding necessitated s e v e r a 1
across-the-board cutbacks, in ad-
dition to a tuition increase of
about 16 per cent.
Smith predicts that depart-
ments will not have to take simi-
lar action during the coming fis-
cal year.

would be required just ti
pay increases and other
tionary, costs of doing th
amount of government bus
the new fiscal year.
New programs come to
in-the-bucket $6 million
$4.3 million of that recom
in matching funds for
crime control grants. Thi:
take some pressure off loc
ernments seeking such gra
The governor also p
$75,000 to support regions
ning agencies around th
and $45,000 to fund a v
commission office.
Nearly every departm
state government was
mended for an increase ir
although Milliken propos
spending for the legisla
cut from $17.3 million t
million.
The top money propo
the budget are $616.7 mi
grants for school aid, $59
lion for welfare, $41.3 mil
higher education and $22
lion for mental health. Li
tops $5 million.
Revenue sharing, a key
last year's budget, got litt
tion this time. With his
for considering local tax e
well as population safety
into law, Milliken propos
ply $3.2 million in gre
make sure every unit wil
least $17 per person, in
from distributions of sa
come and intangibles taxi
Aid, however, is propose
cal units in the crime
grants and in $4.8 million

million
o cover to counties for administration of
infla- direct welfare relief.
ie same Traditionally, the legislature
siness in spends more money than the
governor proposes. Last year, Mil-
a drop- liken proposed a $1.97 billion bud-
, some get but wound up signing appro-
mended priations bills totaling $100 mil-
federal lion above that.
s would Milliken termed the area of so-
cal gov- cial services "the fastest growing
nts. and most difficult to predict in
roposed he budget," echoing his own words
al plan- of a year earlier.
e state He said the number of public
women's assistance recipients is expected
to grow to 671,000 in 1972-73,
compared with 262,400 in 1968-69.
Lent of Details of the budget were given
recom- to legislators by the governor's of-
n funds, fice yesterday. Milliken, vacation-
ed that ing in the Virgin Islands this
ture be week, revealed the budget total
o $15.5 last Thursday in his State of the
State message.;
)sals in He promised to present details
llion in this week, the earliest such out-
4.4 mil- line by a Michigan chief execu-
lion for tive in many years, and at the
8.6 mil- same time urged the Legislature to
ttle else set deadlines for its own work.
This year's budget was not fully
point in adopted until 51/2 months into the
le men- fiscal year.
formula The state's budget, Milliken
ffort as said, has virtually doubled in the
enacted last five years and increased an
ed sim- average of 19 per cent a year.

Legislators
divided on
budget plan
(Continued from Page 1)
don't think the money's there,"
says Sen. Coleman Young (D-De-
troit), Democratic floor leader.
Even if the state financial pic-1
ture has brightened, adds Senate
Appropriations Committee member
Sen. Earl Nelson (D-Lansing), "We
should practice the same scrutiny
of the budget now, as when we
were broke."
Speaking for his party, Sen.
Charles Zollar (R-Benton Harbor),
the influential chairman of the
Senate Appropriations Committee,
gave a nodding approval to the
governor's request saying, "Now
we're going to ask for accounta-
bility for these requests, as we do
each year. We have no built in
resentments, no real objections."
Yet Democratic Stempien sug-
gests that Milliken may be some-
what over-confident in his discus-
sion of state's finances with the
hopes of pumping renewed opti-
mism into his consitutents.
"A lack of confidence in the
marketplace prevails presently,"
says Stempien, "the best posture
practically for Milliken is to stick
to his predictions. I'm just some-
what pessimistic because I've
heard that song before," says
Stempien.

Daily Official Bulletin
THURSDAY, JANUARY 20
Ctr. for Contin. Education of Wor-
en: Conversation, "The Child and the
Working Mother." 330 Thompson St.,
1-3 pm.
LSA Coffee Hour: Special guest,
Charles Witke, LSA assoc. dean, 2549'
LSA, 3-4:30 pm.
Nuclear Colloquium: Lectures by R.L.
Shoup and M.A. Firestone, P&A Colloq.
Rm., 4 pm.
International Tea: 603 E. Madison,
4:30-6 pm.
International Night: foods from the
Netherlands and Belgium. Mich.1
League Cafeteria, 5-7.15 pm.
Music School: Univ.,Chamber Choir,+
Univ. Arts Chorale, Hill Aud., 8 pm.
Computing Center will temporarily
cease operations at midnight, Fri., Jan.
21 to install new equipment; should
be operational by Sun. afternoon, Jan.
23 or Mon. morning; users obtain up-
to-date info on status by calling 763-
0420 at any time; users' workroom will'
remain open on regular weekend1
schedule.
Attention Students:)
Jan. 28, 1972 (5 p.m.) is the last 'datet
for the Winter Term when the Regis-
trar's Office will: a. Accept the Stu-
dent 100 per cent Withdrawal Notice
for refund purposes; b. allow refund for1
student who reduces hours of course
credit.1

Bomb scare
hits UGLI
The University's; Undergraduate
Library was evacuated last night
by virtue of a bomb scare.
The library was cleared for
about 15 minutes, from 7:45 to
8:00, after an unidentified caller
reported there was a bomb in the
building.
Burns Security Guard Steve
Nicholas said that Burns Extension
22 received a call at 7:40 warning
of the existence of the bomb. The
Daily received a similar call.
According to Nicholas, he and
Ann Arbor police then evacuated
the building. No thorough search
was made for the alleged bomb,
he said, since the Ann Arbor police
department has no bomb squads.
Nicholas said the incident was
"just another bomb scare," adding
that "the whole thing was pretty
much of a farce."

4i

*i

UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
TAE KWON DO CLUB
- KOREAN KARATE -
FIRST MEETING and DEMONSTRATION
THURSDAY, JAN. 20 -7:00 P.M.
in WATERMAN GYM
call 763-6437 or 662-9727 for further info.
OLD MEMBERS MEET 4-6 MON., TUES., WED.
in Women's Athletic Bldg. to train for demo,

ants to
I get at
1972-73
les, in-
:es.
d to lo-
control
a in aid

MICHIGAN UNION LANES

TAPE IT EASY
Sony Model 127 Stereo
Cassette Deck
An excellent choice for today's
advanced stereo enthusiast, the
127 adds high performance to
cassette convenience.
FEATURES:
0 Built-In Peak Limiter for
Distortion-Free Recording
0 Tape Select Switch for
standard and new Chromium
Dioxide Cassettes
9 DualrProfessional-type vu
Meters
0 Three-Digit Tape Counter
0 Pause Control with Lock
0 Stereo Headphone Jack
0 Microphone and Auxiliary
Inputs
$149.95
S SUPERSCOPE®
You never heard it so good

Leagues for
Mon.-Tnu

SIGN UP NOW!
rming ACU-1
irs. Tournament

I

i

i

OPEN NOON MON.-SAT., 1-P.M. SUN.

age"

I

I

MIXER
9-12 TON ITE
THURSDAY, JAN.20
Music by MANCHILD
FREE REFRESHMENTS
LAWYER'S CLUB
551 S. STATE

In Welcoming The New Adults
the RUBAJYAT
102 S. First 663-2401
Announces Every Thursday Night.
after 9:30 P.M.
A YOUTH NIGHT
with the Iris Bell Adventure
rocking your minds
with the best rock music
and reduced prices.
So we can all afford to have fun, fun, fun.

I

$1001000
RACKHAM STUDENTS
$100,000
Included with your ballot in the mailing for the Rackham
Student Government election is a questionnaire about
the sources of money you are tapping to support your
studies. It is very important that you fill out and return
this questionnaire. Currently all Teaching Fellows; most
Research Assistants' and all Staff Assistants' salaries
include a sum of money expected to be returned to the
university as tuition. The difficulty with this "incestuous
financing" is that this sum is part of a graduate student
employee's TAXABLE income. If this sum were delivered
in the form of a tuition scholarship, it would be non-tax-
able. This might save Rackham students more than
$100,000 in taxes.
The U presently does not, however, possess adequate
information to assess the costs and benefits of changing
from "incestuous financing" to tuition scholarships. The
RSG questionnaire is an attempt to provide this informa-
tion. IT IS ESPECIALLY IMPORTANT FOR TFs, RAs, and
OTHER U EMPLOYEES TO RETURN THE QUESTION-
NAIRE. The questionnaire may be returned with your
ballot in the envelope provided either by campus mail or
U.S. mail.
Rackham Student Government Executive Council

4

r--

TG
Delta Sigma Delta
Fraternity
FRI., JAN. 21, 8-11 p.m.
Live Band & Refreshments
1502 Hill St.

ANN ARBOR ABORTION ACTION COALITION
MEETING
Thurs., Jan. 20-7:30 p.m.
1510 SAB
* PLAN FUTURE ACTIVITIES TO HELP
REPEAL ALL ANTI-ABORTION LAWS
END RESTRICTIVE CONTRACEPTION LAWS
STOP FORCED STERILIZATION
ALL WOMEN WELCOME

HI-Fl BUYS
Ann Arbo-East Lansing
618 S. Main 769-4700
Comprehensive Repair
Service Available

+

Don't forget tomorrow (Friday) is still
SINGLE'S NIGHT

I

L

wr"~m

III

f r

i

I L

1

MUSEUM
WITHOUT
WALLS
SCHEDULE
(A) MONDAY, JANUARY 31,7:30 P.M. . (B)
Picasso: War, Peace and

AN UNUSUAL SERIES
OF NEW FILMS ON
ART PRODUCED BY
UNIVERSAL STUDIOS
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 3,7:30 P.M.
Love-Goya

-4

PEOPLE NEEDED FOR COMMITTEE ON

I

FOOD

CO-OP

We need VOLUNTEERS to help us make the Food Co-op a
reality. Contact:

STUDENT GOV'T COUNCIL
ROOM 3X, MICHIGAN UNION, OR CALL 763-3241

Pi

(At MONDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 7:30 P.M. (B) THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 7:30 P.M.
Giotto and the Pre-Renaissance-Crete and Mycenae +
(A) MONDAY, FEBRUARY 14,7:30 P.M. (B) THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 117,7:30 P.M.
The Art Con serator-Ki netic Art in Paris--The Impressionists . .< _
(A) MONDAY, FEBRUARY 21, 7:30 P.M. (B) THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 24,7:30 P.M.
LCorbusier-The Greek TemPl e
()MONDAY, FEBRUARY 28,7:30 P.M. (B) THURSDAY, MARCH 2,7:30 P.M. < > } ..;
The Cubist Epoch-Germany: Dada
Sponsored by the School of Architecture and Design and The Extension Service
ALL SHOWINGS IN THE RACKHAM LECTURE HALL
Individual Tickets at the Box Office If Available: Adults, $2.50; Students, $1.50
..:::::. . ,...... ' .> :>r: :::::.:r::::..........*."*.r ...:. :, RESERVE YOUR SERIES SUBSCRIPTION NOW ! .<:: :.
gy{-..{ ...?".:;. :
I1
UIRALMUSEUM OF ART .........
...: :::......... MUSEUM WITHOUT W ALLS :"
.i:.:.6..a.:......: Series Subscriptions: Adults, 10; Studennts, $6. Only_ ,... .
:'::>: : .. ...... series tickets will be solder in advance. Series subscription
* guaranteesasettecho the five programs. Two I X
........ hours of film at each pro grain.r ...........
' ADDRESS "_____________________________________________
is 1 /

4i

COLD & HUNGIRY?,
(need a roof and moral sup port for the long winter?)
Co-operatives. Offer an Alternative

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan