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April 06, 1972 - Image 2

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1972-04-06

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Page Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Pae woTH-MCHGA-DIL

.rr

Thursday, April 6, 1972

Patience: A

milkmaid's virtue

By JEFFREY LAINE
If you don't know about the
Gilbert and Sullivan Society,
they are a group of sometimes
talented. often energetic and us-
ually entertaining amateurs. If
you're looking for a break from
The Godfather complex-some-
thing light, farsical, witty, and in
the guise of a musical comedy-
look no further. The greatest
demand upon your mental facul-
ties comes from the plot. Frank-
ly, as I sat awaiting the curtain,
reading the synposis of the plot,
I thought I was at a meeting on
,..-mental health - perhaps as a
representative "out" patient. In
other words, it takes Patience.
Once. upon a time, there were
20 love-sick maidens, all of whom
passioned for Reginald, that fop
of a. mystic poet. Then, there
was Patience, a milkmaid, sim-
ple and plain, who had never
Daily Robert Wargo loved anyone except a great aunt
A love-sick maid and a Dragoon Guard (they don't count) and a child-
hat's happening in the arts?

hood sweetheart. Now we can't
forget the 20 Dragoon Guards
(led by the Duke) who used to
be-but are no longer-fianced
to the 20 lovesick maidens. All
on account of their. new found
hero, Reginald.
Now here come the complica-
tions. Patience doesn't love the
vain-glorious poet who is simply
mad for her but as a matter of
virtue she decides to marry him
anyway.
As luck would have it, Archi-
bald, Patience's old flame, comes
out of the blue after 15 years
and the two fall hopelessly in
love. Much to Reginald's chag-
rin, Archibald displaces Reginald
as the idol of the masses. Oh,
what do to? The story twists
and turns until everything ends
tangled happily ever after.
Working within a pitence of a
budget, the Society has wrought
good scenery and passable (if
natty and poorly co-ordinated)
costumes. But "make do" seems
to necessarily be the Society's
watch-word. And if you think

about it, they do quite nicely.
Presenting as many as 30 actors
on stage presents many a tech-
nical problem. Nancy Hall Gil-
martin worked a bit of hocus-
pocus: her choreography. The
dances are all well thought-out,
presenting the spectator with
scene after scene of moments
calculated to keep us amused
and interested. The music lit-
erally has its highs and and its
lows. From time to time, a bad
note moans out of the horns but
nobody really seems to mind.
However listening to the singers,
one becomes profoundly aware
of the most important element
in musical comedy. You've got
to be able to understand what
they're singing about. With the
exception of Keith Brown (Regi-
nald) and Mary Lou Zuelch
(Patience) there would not have
been a show. I almost feel like
writing that a star is born: Mr.
Brown was beautiful. A good
singing voice which is clear and
distinct coupled with great stage
presence, character and person-
ality, makes E.' Lee Davis
(Archibald) show a poor second
as his rival.

Miss Zuelch is the other show
stopper 4 or saver depending on
where you're sitting). She is the
only songstress who seems to
make any sense. Naively flit-
tering between duty to her lovers
and virtue, her fine voice and
well executed movements ac-
company her wherever she goes.
At any rate, when Brown and
Zuelch are on, so is the show.
When they aren't . . . I say no
more.,
Patience starts very strong,
very energetic. It is this
strength that gives their shows
rhyme and reason. But as the
curtain comes up on the second
act, the energy level, like the
quality, goes down. What begins
well, sags toward the middle
and seems to end rather dis-
mally. But such is life. I've said
this once before about the Gil-
bert and Sullivan Society but it
bears repetition. They're not
great. I'm not even sure they
are good. Still, I'd go see them
again. Give it a. try.

NSN MED. FRAT.
1912 GEDDES
(across from the Arb)
Thursday, April 6-8:30-12
Live Band-Draft Beer
Females Free-Males $2.00

A'

EASTERN MICHIGAN UNIVERSITY
MAJOR EVENTS COMMITTEE
PRESENTS:

I

I

So again it's time for your
Daily arts page to say what's
happening for you in the arts . . -
For fans of fantasy, films and
comics, we offer the Detroit
Triple Fan Fair. The three day
convention will meet this week
end at the Pick Fort Shelby
Hotel in Downtown Detroit. Fea-
tured guests include Russ Heath
Little Annie Fanny artist, and
Richard Buckler, artist of The
Avengers and Kazar. The week-
end will include panel discus-
sions, auctions, original art dis-
plays, hundreds of rare comics,,
and movies until dawn. Admis-
sion: $1.50 at the door.
For lovers of poetry we have
two events. This afternoon a se-
lect group of student poets will
read at 4:00 in the UGLI mul-
tipurpose room. Tomorrow
night, poets Donald Hall, Tom
MacIntyre and Andrew Carri-
gan will read at 7:30 at Guild
House (802 Monroe).
For our musical souls:
This weekend the Ark coffee-
house presents The Annual Cei-
Ildh (A Musical Party) on Fri-
day and Saturday with Michael
Cooney, Marshall Dodge, Davey
Jones, Barry O'Neill and Roger
Renwick. Sunday will feature A
Tribute to Woody Guthrie with
Bob White, Pam Ostergren,
Barry O'Neill and Marjorie Gu-
thrie Admission: $2.00 and
$1.50.
The School of Music presents
Verdi's opera Falstaff (in Eng-
lish) tonight and tomorrow
night at 8:00 in the Power Cen-
ter. Admission: $3.50, $2.50
($1.00 tickets for University stu-
dents with I.D. cards, sold at

the box office only).
Shantung traditional music
from China will be presented to-
morrow night in the final con-
cert of the University Musical
Society East Asian Series fea-
turing the Lu Sheng ensemble.
Tickets: $2.50, $4, and $5, avail-
able at the UMS office in Bur-
ton Tower.

The Minnesota Orchestra will
perform with the University
Choral Union in a program pre-
sented by the University Musi-
cal Society this Sunday in Hill
Auditorium. Tickets $2 - $7 at
the Hill Auditorium box office.
Blues Power: The University
Folklore Society will present
blues musicians Son House,
Mance Lipscomb, and Robert
Pete Williams in concert next
Saturday at 8:00 at the Power
Center. Tickets: $3.00, avail-
able at the Michigan Union tic-
ket office.
And for our dramatic souls:
Promises, Promises will be
presented by The University
Professional Theatre Program

at the Power Center this Sat-
urday and Sunday at 3:00 and
8:00.
An original adaptation of
Erskine Caldwell's novel To-
bacco Road will be presented
by the Theatre Company of Ann
Arbor, Inc. at Conspiracy April
13-16. Tickets: $1.50, available
at Centicore Bookstore (So.
University).
The Company is a "unique
kind of repertory theatre" re-
cently organized to provide an
alternative to local "legitimate
theatre." They differ from the
traditional theatre by not lim-
iting themselves to play-scripts,
or to procenium, thrust and are-
na stages. "Imagine: all forms
of literature unfolding in the
theatre of your mind . . , the
fusion of literature, perform-
ance and you."
And finally, for the gallery
enthusiast, we have Black on
Black, a two-woman black art
show, featuring graphics, paint-
ings and drawings by Janet
Taylor and Adrienne Horad,
which opens Sunday at the Py-
ramid Gallery and will continue
thru April 22.
Rent your
Roommate with
a Classified Ad
HAIRSTYLING
AS YOU LIKE ITI
NEW TRENDS FOR 1972
TRIMS-SHAGS
and RAZOR CUTS
Dascola Barbers
2 SHOPS
.@611 E University
. 615 E. Liberty

.i

AMERICAN INTERNATIONALpr~ews
EDGAR ALLAN POE'S
MASTERPIECE OF THE MACABRE
THE SQUE
-- OF TH E
RED DEATH{
a nP='ECOL.OR,
....VINCENT PRICE
A WQVELY SORTEATH
ames H.Sicholson Samuel Muff .PSYIIEDEUC
P PETER FONDA
SUSANERECOMMENDED FOR
STRASB RG E MATURE AUDIENCES
written by JACK NICHOLSON
also starring DENNIS HOPPER, BRUCE DERN
LATE SHOW FRI. and SAT.
not continuous with "Finzi-Continis"

OPEN 12:45
SHOWS AT
1 p.m., 4:30, 8 p.m.
Mon.-Sat. $1.50 until 4:30
Mon.-Thurs. eve. $2.00
Fri. and Sat. eve. $2.50
Al Day Sunday $2.50
603 E. Liberty

NEIL DIAMOND
plus ALBERT BROOKS
APRIL 9th-8:30 P.M
TICKETS: $3.50, $4.50, $5.50
Still available at: Ypsilanti-McKenny Union,
Ann Arbor--Ann Arbor Music Mart

..DIAL 665-6290

. ....-

I [L=

116

rI

CI

ROGER CORMAN FESTIVAL

4 Ln,] iJ1} C

Doors Open-i
Show Starts-
Doors Close-i

1 :00
1:15
1:30

THEATRE COMPANY OF ANN ARBOR, INC.
presents
ERSKINE CALDWELL'S
TOBACCO ROAD
an original adaptation of the novel
CONSPIRACY COFFEEHOUSE-THEATRE
(330 Maynard St.)
APRIL 13, 14, 16, 8 p.m. APRIL 15, 7 & 10 p.m.
TICKETS $1.50--available at the door and from Centicore
-Ann Arbor; Ned's-Ypsi
WELCOME TO THE
CHINESE PING PONG TEAM
The International Friendly Table Tennis Match
CHINA and U.S.
will be held at COBO ARENA
8:00 P.M.-Friday, April 14
The Friendly Exhibition Match at U of M
will be held at CRISLER ARENA
1:30 P.M.-2:30 P.M.-Saturday, April 15
TICKETS ON SALE AT ATHLETIC DEPARTMENT, STATE
AND HOOVER, BEGINNING WED., APRIL 5
Sponsored by: The U.S. Committee on
U.S.-China Relations

I

THURSDAY and FRIDAY
THE LADY
EVE
Dir. PRESTON STURGES, 1941
BARBARA STANWYCK
is an insolent adventuress
who fights off other drag-
ons. Those of you who
know him, know that
Sturges can make a great
movie. This one is guar-
anteed.
ARCHITECTURE
AUDITORIUM

4

"The best comedy
of the year
and the
DIAL h.. mmm~
OPEN blovest
12:45
SHOWSow -NEWSWEEK MAGAZINE
AT
1 P.M.
3 P.M.
5 P.M. M T T
'7 P.M.
9 P.M.

TH
FRI
Ma,
TUE
6:4,
SA
& V
AT
1 :1'
6:1'
8:4!

BEST PICTURE
OF THEYAR!
-National Board of Revs w
URS.,
ES. AT
G5 &9:05
T., SUN.,
VED.
5-3:45-
Colu~ba Pkkom Pwew,3a PlabxoyPxjd I
Roman Planskfs
MACBETH

7 & 9 P.M.

75c

ReneeTavlor-Joseph Bologna
Made For Each Other
-STARTS THURSDAY, APRIL 13th-

SPECIAL NOTE!
Change of schedule!
We regret that due to a distri-
butor's oversight we are unable
to show George Cukor's "The
Women."

U

I

I

THE
- pI
A B'OA PicTURES
A BBS PROOUCTION

"A MASTERPIECE!"
-PAUL D. ZIMMERMAN, Newsweek
resenr' r
-E

II

I

ANN ARBOR CIVIC BALLET
in
Spring Concert
PREMIERE PERFORMANCE
Nh dPAI IA
Choreographed and Mounted
by DOM OREJUDOS of the Illinois Ballet Co.
FRIDAY, APRIL 7-8:00 P.M.4
PIONEER HIGH SCHOOL

Dial 668-6416 LIBERTY AT MAYNARD
M

U of M Folklore Society
presents
Son House
Mance Lipscomb
Robert Pete Williams
APRIL 15-8 P.M.-POWER CENTER
Wed., Nov. 26, 1969 ** San Francisco Chronicle
AN OLD MAN SINGS THE BLUES
Ralph J. Gleason
THERE were four blues singers inthe concert at
King Hall on the U.C. Berkeley Campus last
week and each of them played the guitar. There
was Bukka White, a rotund man in a blue shirt
with huge white polka dots, Mance Lipscomb,
looking thin and severe in work clothes and a
hat, Son House, looking" old and supremely dig-
nified and Lightning Hopkins, rather like a cari-
cature of himself in dark glasses and a powder
blue turtleneck sweater.
Somehow in the context of that program,
Mance Lipscomb and Son House came through as
purer, less show-biz and certainly as the most
effective performers. Bukka White's Jolly jiving
was something less than artistic when he got
to the piano to accompany himself on boogie
woogie (Jimmy Rushing, just to name one per-
former of the blues relatively unknown to that
audience), has a greater future than he knows.
Hopkins sings and plays with fervor and he is

SON HOUSE

olak

ShirleyC Chsom
and
Jane Hart

I

tell you about the blues. The blues that consist
between male and female when one is deceived
by another . . . the blues started a long time
ago" . . . The audience hushed absolutely quiet
to hear him. "I plowed a mule for 50, cents a
day." The words came out in little.clusters, like
notes with pauses in between, and when he said
that, Son House sat there for a minute, bathing
in the applause from this young generation which
can truly find more practical teaching from that
stage and these old men than in most classrooms.
And then he sang. He can still bring it off,
his voice strong for a song and then he has to
rest. He plays the economy but with brilliant
choices and old and tired as he must be, his
bones aching from the weight of those years,
when he does it; he does it the way it should be.
The audience loved it. Students whose parents
weren't even born when Son House was plowing
that Mississippi mule through that 50 cent day,
fiund mr and truth in what he ans tn them

H ill Auditorium

April 10

8:30

is I

I

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