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April 05, 1972 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1972-04-05

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Page Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Wednesdav. Anri ( S. 1972

THE MICHGANIDAILIWIIIIIIIIIIIIIr I -Q7

r Gur ic.'JUU Y/ rN, 11 .!, I z If-

records

Some

fine

new

Feedback on

the

Winter road

Classical pieces

By DONALD SOSIN
Three delightful cantatas by
Telemann make up a new re-
lease on the Philips label (839
600 LY) with Hermann Prey,
the Salzburg Boys' Choir, and
the German Bach Soloists under
the direction of Helmut Win-
schermann.
The first, "The Schoolmaster,"
is a witty satire on a singing
teacher and' his pupils, and
Prey sings the role with fine di-
dacticism. The music is full of
wrong entrances by the school-
boys, and is great fun. The flip
side offers an ode to a dead ca-
nary which twists into a fit of
rage directed at the murderer,
namely, a cat. The aria "My
canary, good night" is particu-
larly beautiful and shows why
Teleniann was so highly regard-
ed in his time, even more so
than Bach.
The final work, a brief can-
tata entitled "The Joys of
Country Life," offers an equal-
ly moving aria, a duet between
Prey and oboist Winschermann.
The cover alone is worth the
price, by the way, with Prey in
18th century get-up, brandish-
ing a feather and admonishing,
presumably, a recalcitrant pupil.
Later 18th century music is
offered by William Bennett and
the Grumiaux Trio - Mozart's
Quartets for Flute and Strings,
K. 285 in D, K. 298 in A, K. 285a
in G, and K. 285b in C. (Philips
6500 034).
The major keys and the deli-
cate sound of the instrumental
combination make the music
soothing in the manner of the
Mozart serenades, rather than
his string quartets, but the mu-
sicians have not done real jus-
tice to it. The sound is heavy
and the instruments tend to
blend into each other; one
misses an airy feeling. The per-
formers are skilled -Artur
Grumiaux is one of the best vio-
linists 'around, but the recording
in no way compares to the vivid,
Aill
#,-$2.002~

electrifying interpretations of
Rampal, Stern, Schneider and
Rose on Columbia (M 30233).
The latters' are generally brisk-,
er, but even when not, have an
incisiveness and vitality that
makes much more sense than
the liquid interpretations on the
Philips disc. The overall sound
is not as good on Columbia. but
one does hear the individual
parts more clearly.
More Mozart, this time string
quartets, on Philips (6500 142).
At the present time, ho other
recording of these four quartets
(K. 80, 155, 156, 157) is listed
in Schwann. And luckily,'this
one is very fine indeed. The per-
formers are the Quartetto Ital-
iano, who have recorded every-
thing from Beethoven to Schu-
bert to Dvorak and also have a
new Webern album out. Their
playing is full of spirit and thei'
ensemble places them in the
front ranks of string quartets
toaay.
Perhaps the most interesting
facet of this recording is the
inclusion of an earlier slow
movement for K. 156. It is typ-
ically charming, but nothing
special, and more, of a solo for
the first violinist than a bal -
anced movement for all the
players. The fascinating point is
to compare this with the Adagio
that Mozart finally used, com-
posed three months later. The
6 o m p a h accompaniment is
turned into a long, slow line
that adds a new dimension to
the notes.
Of the rest, the music is, as
might be expected, well-crafted
but naive. One has to keep in
See SOME, Page 6

By HERB BOWIE
Spirit, like the Steve Miller
Band, the Lovin' Spoonful and
the Sir Douglas Quintet, was one
of those groups that, while never
great, were consistently good.
The band had five excellent,
imaginative musicians, four of
whom wrote nice songs. Their
style was an original blend of
jazz and rock that by turns
manifested itself as hard rock
in "I Got a Line on You" and
cool, eerie jazz in "Fresh Gar-
bage." As a freaky-looking dude
once said to a relatively straight
friend of mine as he was wait-
ing for his freshly bought Fam-
ily that Plays Together to be
bagged, "Yessir, Spirit's got
something for everybody."
Unfortunately, that band is no
more. The group going by that
name now retains only two of
its original members, Ed Cas-
sidy on drums and John Locke
on keyboards.' Replacements are
the Staehely brothers, Al on
}lass and doing most of the sing-
ing and writing, J. Christian on
guitar. These last two guys be-
ing pretty dull, their first al-
bum, Feedback (Epic KE 31175),
is a fairly mediocre offering.
J. Christian Staehely is no
substitute for Randy California,
either in name or on guitar. In
contrast with California's in-
ventive playing, Staehely's is
dull and cliche-ridden. Al's bass
is unimaginative compared to
Mark Andes' proficient riffs; his
singing is generally typical in-
expressive primal rock 'n roll
shouting, screaming when he
should whisper; his 'songs are
o.k. but fairly run-of-the-mill
folk and rock 'n roll, no matchj
for the old group's original ef-
forts.
Yet there are bright spots,
mostly due to Locke. Staehely's
"Mellow Morning" would be a
boringly routine laid-back coun-
try tune were it not for Locke's

Feedback

Al's fingers); in fact the only
thing missing is California's gui-
tar, but at least J.C. plays a
minimal role.
So, if you're hankering for an
echo the old Spirit's inventive-
ness and you can stand a large
dose of tired rock 'n roll, give
Feedback a try.
Some time ago Edgar Winter,
after producing a fairly well-
received jazz-rock album, decid-
ed to make music that would
have a greater visceral impact
and appeal to a wider audience
(not to mention make more
money.) Having searched New
York in vain for some adequate
back-up musicians willing to
tour, he finally ended up with
essentially the band he played
with in high school, the Gold.
enaires - with the significant
addition of Rck Derringer, for-
merly of Johnny Winter and,
on guitar. Edgar Winter's White
Trash was born.
Their second album, Road-
work (Epic KEG 31249), a live
double} album, is a pretty good
party/drinking album. If they
had been willing to settle for a
less representative cross-section of
their performances a single album

CENSOED
- ANDMOVIES
EXPOSED!
O wlX
Z SO"ADULT...ONE'X'
NM ISN'T ENOUGH 1
Censorship,
S I inAnerica$
0
BLI

4

Roadwork

shimmering keyboards, but his
efforts actually transform it
into an interesting cut. In fact
most of the songs would be un-
bearably bland without the spice
added by Locke. Even with
Locke's help, though, the only
completely successful song is
"Trancas Fog-Out," one of the
three penned by Locke, an in-
strumental that ranks with
Spirit's old work: Cassidy can
at last break out of his rock
'n roll rhythms and play some
jazz; the bass line is interesting
(Locke was undoubtedly moving

would have been better, but since;8
it's a specially priced double album
it's still a bargain. .1FREE LGHTED
See WINTER, Page 6 1- ' PA RNI1
THE SCHOOL OF MUSIC presents
VERDI'S OPERA
FALSTAFF
(IN ENGLISH)
Two Performances only: April 6-7, 8 p.m.
Power Center for the Performing Arts
$3.50, $2.50 ($1.00 tickets for U-M students with I.D. cardssold at
Box Office only, no mail orders)
Conduc or: JOSEF BLATT BOX OFFICE HOURS:
Stage Director: RALPH HERBERT April 3-5, 12:30 to 5 p.m.
Ticket Information: 764-61 18 April 6-7, 12:30 to 8 p.m.

aM

"'THE GODFATHER' IS A MOVIE THAT SEEMS TO
HAVE EVERYTHING! WARMTH, VIOLENCE,
NOSTALGIA, THE CHARISMA OF MARLON BRANDO
IN ONE OF HIS FINEST PERFORMANCES, AND
THE DYNASTIC SWEEP OF AN ITALIAN-AMERICAN
'GONE WITH THE WIND'!"
-Time Magazine

i
I
i
I
i

i
i
I
i+
I
iJ
i1

'1

w

i

MATINEES: $1.50 until 4:30
(except Sunday)
MON.-THURS.: $2 after 4:30
FRI. & SAT.: $2:50 after 4:30
SUN.: $2.50 All Day
Today: Ladies 75c until 4:30
OPEN 12:45
SHOWS: 1 p.m.-4:30-8 p.m.
603 E. Liberty
w ggn

The Center for Continuing Education of Women
and the Center for the Study of Higher Education

Shirley Chishoim
and
Jane Hart

present
SHEILA TOBIAS
Associate Provost, Wesleyan University
National President, Professional Women's Caucus
EDUCATING WOMEN FOR LEADERSHIP:
A PROGRAM FOR THE FUTURE

'GI

DIAL 665-6290

MOMOMM%

I

H ill Auditorium

April 10

8 P.M., THURSDAY, APRIL 6
RACKHAM AMPHITHEATRE
"Women in Perspective" Lecture Series
PUBLIC INVITE

D

FREE

U

- - -- - -t

I

f'

IT CAN'T BE DESCRIBED-
IT MUST BE EXPERIENCED

I

I

FRI. and SAT.
The Annual
Ceilidh
(A Musical Party)
with
Michael Cooney
Marshall Dodge
Davey Jones
Barry O'Neill
Roger Renwick
"folk music has
never been more
alive in Ann Arbor."
-Mich, Daily
SUNDAY-$1.50
A tribute
to Woody
Guthrie
with
Bob White
Pam Ostergren
Barry O'Neill
and
Mrs. Marjorie
Guthrie
WED.
*:~ .1

NIGuN

GRAD
COFFEE
HOUR
Wed., April 5
4-6 p.m.
4th Fl. Rackham

B3S TPICTURE
OF THE YEAR!
-National Board of Review
THE BEST FILM THAT HAS
EVER BEEN MADE OUT OF A
SHAKESPEAREAN TRAGEDY!
-KEVIN SANDERS, ABC-TV
."A Must! Brought
Vividly, Handsomely,
<4>Excitingly to Life!"
HERRIDGE, N.Y. POST
STARTS
I TODAY!
OPEN
12:45
Dma os dSHOWS
os em iformat n 8-641at 9
'214.. f i vers d
wwk .Fdn c h!"ance.a w 3:45
tM~ond.iWiliarmShak~seeare 8:45
E~aop.u uhM Hefner «..d (Andrew Bm~nsbt
i*-i .Ronan olanski THURS.
v4 t., 1mThW .fni ..u. iTd &Aand
H . e an e t F R I.
L 1 1 6:45
Program Information 8-6416 and 9:05
1.214 S. University

I

8:30

TICKETS: $1.50at * Chisholm Hdqtrs.
" 206 Nickels Arcade
- Michigan Union
0 Alpha Phi Alpha House
UAC-Black Affairs, Alpha Phi Alpha, Delta Sigma Theta
and
Chisholm for President

I

}, {,^'

Lemonade and .Cake for all
WELCOME TO THE
CHINESE PING PONG TEAM
The International Friendly Table Tennis Match
CHINA and U.S.
will be held at COBO ARENA
8:00 P.M.-Friday, April 14
The Friendly Exhibition Match at U of M
will be held at CRISLER ARENA
1:30 P.M.-2:30 P.M.-Saturday, April 15
TICKETS ON SALE AT ATHLETIC DEPARTMENT, STATE'
AND HOOVER, BEGINNING WED., APRIL 5
Chinese Student Association at U of M
in conjunction with the
Center of Chinese Studies
rP
KRIS KRISTOFFERSON
and BONNIE RAITT
FRI., April 21
8 p.m. Hill Aud.
$1.50, 3.00, 4.50 U
reserved seat

I

BOX OFFICE OPEN 6:30
SHOWS STARTS AT DUSK
FLY GIRLS WHO KNOW WHAT TO DO!
"Swedish Fly Girls" (R)
2 SHOWINGS NIGHTLY 7:15 & 10:35
--PLUS-
A Game Called BACKYARD BINGO!
"THE SWAPPERS"-9:10
T7T110 .Va IU1W--1

aww asa=boob
cweV

I

Academy Award Nominee!
BEST ACTOR: GEORGE C. SCOTT
"The Hospital" (GP)
p 2 SHOWINGS NIGHTLY AT 7:15 & 10:50
L JASON ROBARDS BRITT EKLAND
U "THE NIGHT THEY
S RAIDED MINSKY'S"

. _- _.urrr~j

M Air

1/

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