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March 22, 1972 - Image 8

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1972-03-22

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Page Eight

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Wednesday, March 22, 1972

PRESCRIPTION EYEWARE
and SHADES

--------------
Bob, Buffy, and
Judy get it all
together...for
I I
everyone tuned
Iin to today's
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"A captivating
and obsessive
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by Anthony Scaduto. A block- I
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lected by The Book Find Club. 1
An Alternate Selection of The
Book-of-the-Month Club.
*Lillian Roxon, N.Y. Daily News
When she sings
r of war, it is with
power and fury. I
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sings of love,
she is as fragile
as a hummingbird t
:. . The Buf fy
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paper $495 ,
Sing and play 60 of Buffy's j
most famous songs, all with
guitar chords, and piano ac-
companiment for 10 of her
greatest hits. Plus the stories
behind her songs; lessons on
how to play the Indian bow, a I
complete discography, over 50 I
photos, and her own line draw- I
ings. A Buffy bonanza!
- ~ "My music
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go with elation or
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always there,(
faithful in its way f
as an old lover, or
overnight guest."'
The Judy
Collins Songbook
paper $495
55 of the great songs Judy
sings like no one else, arranged
for guitar and piano. Included:
"Anathea," "The Bells of!
Rhymnie," and "Michael from
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Ben edict
By FRANK LONGO Brian:
The Michigan baseball team's 9 for 18
"real" opening game is still 13 which he
days away, but until that time Leon R
the Wolverines and Coach Mil- John Lon
bry "Moby" Benedict are living oski all h
with a 3-6 record that shouldn't figure, -wi
even be included in the season all-aroun
statistics. A 6-3
April 4 will find Michigan Roberts
playing at the University of De- team l
troit in the first of 31 games be- played,g
tween then and May 20. The hits, rbi
nine games played on the an- runs.
nual spring trip to Arizona can't "Ve n
be considered anything more explained
than spring exhibition contests hit effeci
in preparation for that "opener." If we wa
Prior to the spring break going to
Michigan's outdoor practice was that."
nonexistent and the indoor "Our p
schedule consisted mainly of the infie
sharing the YostFieldhouse fa- especially
cilities with the track and foot- ued Ben
ball teams. Thetsquad battled Ball led
against a machine and fielded six errors
ground balls off the hard sur- Michig
face, form att
Hitting against an erratic had tog
curve ball throwing robot is 80 to 90
somewhat different than facing teams w
live Arizona State pitching. And "I'm no
the hard floor of Yost Field- record. VG
house is just not the same as - . and
short green grass, as far as teams in
fielding is concerned, best," Be
"People remember that we "I'll to
lost 26-1." commented Benedict football1
about the road trip. "What they the hall
don't remember is that we came go outv
back fighting the next day and play Nebr
lost to the same team 2-0." they'd do
"I think we hit better than There's
we ever have," said Moby. The gan can't
statistics certainly bear him out. tender th
Five hitters at .300 or better
and three more close behind is
quite remarkable for a team
known as good pitch-no hit last AL
season.

keep
Balaze led the attack at
in the six games in
filled in at second base.
oberts, Pat Sullivan,
nchar, and Jim Kocol-
it above the magic .300
ith Roberts out in front
rd.
junior from Portage,
came home with the
eadership in innings
games, at bats, runs,
's, doubles and home
eeded some timely hits,"
d Benedict. "We did not
tively with men on base.
ant to score runs we're
have to learn to do
pitching was good, but
ld play was very spotty,
y the left side," contin-
edict. Shortstop Reggie
in this category, with
s.
;an is not in midseason,
this point. The players
get used to playing in
0 degree heat against
ho play in it all year.
t disappointed with our
We had to go out there
d play one of the best
the country, maybe the
nedict continued.
ell you what. If that'
team (pointing down
to Bo's office) had to
with no practice and
raska, how do you think
s no reason why Michi-
t be a Big Ten title con-I
his season, despite the

S fai th
losing "exhibition" record.
Moby is guardedly optimistic:
"If they (the players) play the
way they're capable of playing,
I think we can win the Big Ten.
If I didn't feel that way, I
wouldn't enter the season."
He offers no alibis for the
past, but Benedict knows, too,
that the breaks can go either
way, even his way.
"It's kind of hard to play
when you're losing 16-0 in the
third inning," he said, referring
to the now famous shellacking
by Arizona.
"But the next day we gave
them two runs in the first inn-
ing and shut them out the rest
of the way. If they had called a
balk it would have been 2-1.
And if John Lonchar's line drive
with the bases loaded had been
a foot higher, it would have been
3-2, the University of Michigan."
Michigan has a fine baseball
tradition. Hopefully, they will
have a fine team this year. A 3-6
spring trip record at this point
is not an indication of how their
season will turn out.

'M' R UGBY CLUB
British sport gains popularity

4

EL CARS
GREATLY

When the
Paulists were
foundedin-1858
by Isaac Hecker, they were the
first religious Community of
pr'ests established in North
America by an American and
for Americans.
Father Hecker. who was a cen-
ury ahead of his time, wanted
Paurlists to1 be free of compul-
sor activ ti ss oethey could be
liexibl cenough to meet the
needs of the Church in every age
as they arose.
Today's Paulist can be as in-
volved as he wants to be. He is
given the freedom to use his own
talents to do his own thing. He
may be a parish priest, an edu-
cator or a press, radio or televi-
sion personality.
Father Hecker discovered the
value of communications early.
With his monthly publications
and pamphlets, he laid the
foundation for the Paulist/New-
man Press, the country's largest
publisher and distributor of
Catholic literature.
Today, Father Liecker's vision
and foresight have led to the es-
tablishment of Paulist radio, tele-
vision and film centers on a scale
that perhaps, not even he dreamed
of.
But then, he had the vision.
He showed us the way.
For more information on the
Paulists. write to: Rev. Donald
C. Campbell, Vocation Director,
Room 500.
415 West 59th Street
New York, N.Y.10019

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I
I
I
I
I

By CHUCK DRUKIS
In these times of commercial-
ized professional collegiate ath-
letics, there are still some sports
that retain their integrity. One
such sport is rugby.
In the last decade, the popular-
ity of rugby has more than quad-
rupled, with most major cities and
colleges across the country hav-
ing at least one team.
Yet, why the revival of rugby?
Rugby flourished as much as any
other sport in the early part of
the 1900's. But then the indus-
trial revolution captured the
hearts of Americans. New sports
with anti-European origins and
sentiments gained popularity -
strongly supported by the philoso-
phy that American ideas were
superior.Thus evolved astepchild
of rugby - American football.
But as with other segments of
the industrial sectors, the environ-
For the Student Body:
SALE
" Jeans
" Bells
" Flares
1*00
reg. to $24.00
SCEKMATE
State Street at Liberty

ment became polluted. Money re-
placed sport. As sport fans are
again beginning to realize the es-
sence of sport, rugby has become
an available alternative.
Rugby was born in 1823 at
Rugby College, England. During a
soccer game William Ellis disre-
garded the rules of soccer by
picking up a bouncing ball and
carrying it across the goal for a
score. Probably for the best, his-
tory has not recorded the com-

ball. Immediately, the forwards
from both teams will gather
around the ball, each on his side
of an imaginary line of scrim-
mage. The purpose of this action,
which is called a loose ruck, is to
heal the ball back to your own
scrum half who will pick up the
ball, and head up field.
However, when a tackle is about
to be made, the ball is pitched out
to a following back who will con-
tinue the action. Once a tackle is

ments of Ellis' opponents. made, the forwards must again
Internationally, rugby was play- try to get the ball out.
ed in the 1908, 1920, and 1924 The ball may also be kicked
Olympics. The U.S., represented ahead and recovered by the kick-
by teams made up largely of Cali- ing team.
fornians, won in both 1920 and If the ball goes out of bounds,
1924, making them the only double the -backs will line up in their set
gold winner in rugby. positions across the field, while
The purpose of rugby is toll the forwards will lineup at the
score, much like in football. The out-of-bounds line for a jump
play. however, is a lot different, ball.
There is no halt in action after a
tackle. and forward passes are not. ,
permitted. The ball can only be
advanced by running or kicking.
Passes may only be lat-raled to
the side or to the rear. Blocking is iorldisplay
illegal.
There are 15 players on each
team. Usually each team is di-
vided into eight forwards and t s e
seven backs. The football fan
would find the positions confus- f On Thursday, Friday and Sat-
ins. but some comparison ispos.Iurday evenings of March 23, 24,
sible if one looks at the positions and 25, the University of Michi-
during a set scrummage. gan Michifish will present their
The first row of three forwards 24th annual water show entitled
consist of one prop on each side "AquaScenium" at the Margaret
and a hooker in the middle. This Bell Pool. The fifteen routines will
can be compared the require- depict various types of theatre
ments of guards and a center. from primitive through circus,
The second row is made un of opera through rock opera.
a wing forward on each end push-
ing in at an angle, with two sec- For those who have never seen
ond row forwards in the middle. a water show, Miss Joyce Linde-
They are somewhat like two ends man, the coach of the Michifish
and tackles, and provide 75 per explains that "synchronized swim-
cent of the forward thrust of the ming may be compared to figure
scrum. skating. Some of our: routines re-
The final row is simply the quire the swimmer to remain un-
lonely number eight, who can best der water from 25 to. 30 seconds
be compared to a linebacker. while executing some intricate
The back who stays near the maneuver."
scrum and receives the ball is The performance begins at 8:15
similar to a split-T quarterback, p.m. and promises to be a wealth
and is known as the scrum half. of fascinating entertainment. Tie-
He controls play to some extent, kets are available for all three
especially when the ball is thrown performances and may be pur-
into the scrum. chased for $1.25 at the Margaret
Angling back from the scrum Bell Pool or at the door.
are the standoff, the inside cen- Highlights of this year's show
ter, the outside center, and the will include a solo by Miss Nancy
right and left wings. They are all Schauer, a duet by Paulajean
like halfbacks, while the rugby Comstock and Nancy Schauer,
fullback acts as a safety man and last year's Intercollegiate duet
often saves the day by a long champions, a team number in-
kick back into opposing territory. eluding 4 of last year's second
The game begins with a kick- place Intercollegiate team, and
off. When the player with the ball a finale featuring 24 of the Michi-
is tackled, he must release the fish.

-Daily-Jim Judkis

Moby meditates

I

4

~1

Daily Classifieds
B ir~ R~c lh

CArf
aft"No

EXCLUSIVE SCREENINGS
LAST NIGHT TONIGHTM
NAT. SCI. AUDITORIUM __
7 & 9 P.M. $1.50
CREATIVE ARTS FESTIVAL

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BOOKS

4 rng esui s
44
Published at 5.95
Now 3.95
Bosch Durer Michelangelo
Botticelli Giorgione Picasso
Bruegel Leonardo Van Eycks
Canaletto Manet Vermeer
Caravaggio Mantegno Watteau
Each with 64 full page color illustrations plus a complete 4
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Available in limiited quantities

i
r
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(except hardcover textbooks)

INCLUDING PAPERBACK TEXTBOOKS !

;
, -
I
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.
i'

BOOKS ON:

Indians,

Women, Zen,

-- : backpacking, macrobiotics,
bicycling, communes, love
your body, domes, encounter
groups, film, revolutions,
cooking, self-awareness,
Yaqui Ways of Knowledge,}
Nijinsky, free schools, occult, etc....

HILLEL AND MIDRASHA COLLEGE OF JEWISH STUDIES
present a series of lectures on
"Jews and Christians-
The Failure of Accommodation"
. f -w A 0 w 1& S A a. 0% 0

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