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March 22, 1972 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1972-03-22

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

'Page Six

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Wednesday, March 22, 1972

Page Six THE MICHIGAN DAILY Wednesday, March 22, 1972

Authorized and paid for by WIS. STUDENTS FOR McGOVERN
Wdody Woodrich, Chairman, Milwaukee, Wisconsin
GEORGE McGOVERN
CAN WIN WISCONSIN!
Give your Spring Vacation to the Wisconsin Primary
Call:
Madison 608-257-8896
Milwaukee 414-273-3243
McGOVERN FOR PRESIDENT

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BLACK SATIRIST:
Dick Gregory speaks about.
S11 month fast against the war

Fightng,
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Ireland

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(Continued from Page 1)
preference among the present
batch of presidential hopefuls, -but
said he considered the campaign
of N.Y. Rep. Shirley Chisholm to
be the most "interesting."
Gregory entered the lecture hall
yesterday with a clenched fist
salute, flanked by several apparent
bodyguards.
After lengthy welcoming ap-
plause, he explained that now he

CONFERENCE:

StruqC for £tera tion in Latin
MARCH 24-APRIL 7

'Imerica

weighs "About 99 pounds," com-
pared with well over 200 a few
years ago.,
Gregory looked as if he were
about to collapse from ,n. lnu-
trition, but he spoke and moved
about the stage with quick, hum-
orous ease, describing the prob-
lems of an 11-month fast.
"Now I've been reduced to
buyin' my underwear in the chil-
dren's department . . . soon I'll
be down to wearing diapers, and
that's embarrassing."
He then took aim at current po-
litical issues, beginning with school
busing.
"If Wallace is as sincere about

of the school buses to stop thew.?"
On President Nixon's China trip, borite motion of criticism 294-257.
Gregory said he was bothered by The proposals are expected late
the fact that "Every time Nixon this week, after British Prime
leaves, that makes Agnew the Minister Edward Heath goes over
number one boy." them with Premier Brian Faulk-

4

March 24, Friday:
March 25, Saturday:

PARTIAL PROGRAM
9 Economic Mechanisms of Domination
RACKHAM ASSEMBLY HALL, 8 P.M.
* Cultural and Political Dependence
RACKHAM WEST CONFERENCE ROOM, 10 A.M.
" The Latin American Peasantry: Revolution and
Counter-Revolution
RACKHAM WEST CONFERENCE ROOM, 3 P.M.
* Population Control in Latin America
RACKHAM AMPHITHEATER, 2 P.M. (also movie BLOOD OF THE CONDOR)
* Puerto Rico: Divided Nation I
RESIDENTIAL COLLEGE, ROOM 126, 7:30 P.M. (also movie EL PUEBLO SE LEVANTA)
* The Chicano Struggle for Liberation
RESIDENTIAL COLLEGE, ROOM 126, 4 P.M.

"I'm just afraid of him getting
on the hotline and making some
crank calls. . . He'd probably call
up Moscow:'Hey, Kosygin, how's
your mama?'"1
Growing more serious in tone,
Gregory lashed at the government
for not focusing the same energy
and attention to domestic poverty
and inequities as the China trip.
"Dick Nixon should take all
them reporters, TV cameras, and
all that live coverage by satellite
and go to an Indian reservation
for a week . . . or a. ghetto, n
or an old age home ., . . But in-
stead, you know what Dick Nixon
does on weekends? He watches
football games."

March 26, Sunday:
March 27, Monday:
March 28, Tuesday:

ner of Northern Ireland at a meet-
ing today,
Details of the package will re-
portedly include the phasing out
of interment of suspected IRA
troops, a bigger Catholic voice in
Ulster's government and possible
moves toward a united Ireland.
The reaction of Faulkner's Un-
ionist colleagues, even before the
exact ternis are known, was seen
as a reflection' of the hardening
of Protestant opinion in Northern
Ireland against terrorists.
The death toll since August 1969
now stands at 285 and there is in-
creasing evidence of a Protestant
backlash against the IRA's al-
legedbomb-and-bullet campaign.

March 29, Wednesday:* Puerto Rico: Divided Nation 11
RESIDENTIAL COLLEGE, ROOM 126, 7:30 P.M.

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Anderson cites ITT link
to Chile intervention plot

busing as he was abouti
ing, why don't he stand

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April 3, Monday:
April 5, Wednesday:

* Environmental Change in Latin America
(also movie MOSORI MONIKA)
RESIDENTIAL COLLEGE, ROOM 126, 7:30 P.M.
o The Cuban Revolution; Internal Transformations
RESIDENTIAL COLLEGE, ROOM 126, 3 P.M.
* The Cuban Revolution: International Aspects
RESIDENTIAL COLLEGE, ROOM 126, 8 P.M.

I

in front

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WASHINGTON OP) - Column-
ist Jack Anderson says he has
documents purporting to showJ
that International Telephone &
Telegraph Corp. plotted with the
Central Intelligence Agency to
prevent the 1970 election of Sal-
vador Allende as president of
Chile.
The column, published in yes-
terday's editions, says ITT offi-
cials and William Broe of the CIA,
"were plotting together to create
economic chaos in Chile, hoping
this would cause the Chilean army
to pull a coup that would block
Allende from coming to power."
Anderson said Broe reportedly

I

Detailed descripetions of these and other planned sessions will appear in future announcements

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AUSTIN
DIAMOND

1209 S. University

663-7151

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was director of the CIA's Latin
American division.
The Chilean Telephone Co., in
which ITT owned a 70 per cent in-
terest, was among several firms
taken over by Allende's Marxist
government.
In New York, a spokesman for
ITT said the corporation had "no
comment" on Anderson's report.
Anderson said parts of the plot
are outlined in an Oct. 9, 1970
confidential report from ITT Vice
President William Merriam to ITT
Director John McCone, a former
head of the CIA.
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The columnist said the plot had
been detailed,10 days earlier in a
confidential to Harold'. Geneen,
ITT's president, from E. J. Ger-
rity, another of the corporation's
vice presidents. Andeisone said
Gerrity's description showed the
plot called for:
-Banks to refuse or* delay re-
newal of credit:
-Companies to drag their feet
in sending money, making deliv-
eries and in shipping spare parts;
-Pressure to close savings-and-
loan companies to Chile that were
reported to be in trouble; and'
-Withdrawal of all technical
help and refusal to promise any
in the future.
PILL BREAK
Perhaps the world's' greatest
hypochondriac was Samuel Jessup,
born 1752, an English grazier, Be-
tween 1794 and 1816 he is reputed
to have downed 226,934 pills of
various kinds with an annual
"high" of 51,590 in 1814. Before
death took him at the surprisingly
old age of 65, he is alleged to have
washed everything down with
40,000 bottles of medicine.
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wreplaced
our CO trS
TOM ND R th
Computers are great for computing. But, when you have a question.
problem or complaint about bank service, they can be vexing. You
can't converse back and forth with a machine. And, at Ann Arbor
Bank, you don't have to.

Long before the formation of the Human Rights Party,
THE ANN ARBOR DEMOCRATIC WAS WORKING
TO EXPAND VOTING RIGHTS:
1. 1967-71-Democrats fought two city clerks, case by case, to register students who had
been denied the right to vote.
2. 1968--Local Democrats initiated the court suit that eventually gave students the right
to vote where they go to school.
3. 1971-Local Democrats successfully challenged in U.S. District Court the City Charter
rule requiring a year's residency in a ward to run for City Council.
4. 1971-Democratic officials and party members brought about the present deputy reg-
istrar and door-to-door registration programs.
5. 1972-Local Democats obtained a favorable Attorney General's ruling which will make
it easier for students to vote in the August primary by absentee ballot.
6. 1972-HRP wins its suit to invalidate a one - year registration requirement for C it y
Council candidates.
Congratulations to HRP. They've joined the fight that the
Ann Arbor Democratic Party has been waging for years

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