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March 22, 1972 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1972-03-22

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Page Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Wednesday, Mdreh 22, 1972

Page Two THE MICHIGAN DAILY Wednesday, March 22, 1972

Creative Arts Festival and other events

t r nc n narti c .n n .n ric :.srin.c: r

While studying at the UGrI or
even walking through the Diag
on a pleasant spring afternoon,
you may not realize the abun-
dance of talented artists-writ-
ers, poets, painters, musicians,
dramatists-in your midst.
During this month's annual
Ann Arbor Creative Arts Festi-
val, however, their presence will
be difficult to overlook as they
emerge from various crevices of
creative activity and contempla-
tion to participate in a variety of
events and workshops.
The Festival, sponsored by the
University Activities C e n t e r
(UAC), has a relatively long his-
tory' of scheduling speakers and
performers from outside of the
Ann Arbor community. This
year, however, the emphasis is
on local talent and participation.
Highlighting this year's festi-
val is a "Springfest" aimed at
bringing people together to en-
joy their own music, poetry and
dancing.
"Springfest" will begin this
Saturday afternoon with four
hours of arts and crafts demon-
strations and workshops. Spe-
cifically scheduled are a poetry
reading at 1:00 and a quilting
bee at 2:00, Everyone is encour-
aged to bring their own petry
to share.
Later that evening, the Union
Ballroom will be transformed in-
to a coffeehouse featuring folk
music by Sue Geiger and poetry
readings by local artists Ken
Fifer, Larry Ross and Terry
Patten. Again, everyone is en-
couraged to bring their ownpoe-
try and instruments. Free re-
freshments will be served.
Sunday afternoon there will be
an art fair, with overel0 artists
displaying and selling their work.
And that evening, the ballroom
will set the scene for interna-
tional folk and square dancing.
Sponsored by the UM Folklore
Society and the UM Folk Dance
Club, the evening will offer free
dancing lessons.
This year's festival will also
feature two collections of experi-
mental films.
Tonight, films by Beatle John
Lennon and his wife, Yoko Ono
will be shown, including "Rap
II," "Fly," "Apotheosis," and
"Erection."
"Rape II" is a forty minute
film where the cameramen fol-
low a German girl on her visit
to London. She doesn't :peak
English. They don't answer any
of her questions, they don't talk
to her, they follow close to her
heels through the streets, and
into her room.
"Fly" is a, twenty-minute film
showing a fly crawling or sitting
on a nude female body. And
"Erection" is a twenty-minute
film of the slow changes as a
hotel is built and we follow it
through the entire construction
process.
The second collection of films,
"suggested for mature audi-
ences," is scheduled for net
weekend. Included among the
twelve films are Silent Maority,
"a social comment on Middle
America; a b o u t people who
speak, but have nothing to say,"
I Don't Know, "a love story be-
tween a boy who thinks he's a
girl and a girl who thinks she's
a boy," and This Is the Home
of Mrs. Levant Graham," a
sensitive portrait of a black ur-

Some samplings from the Undergraduate Art Show

ban mother and the large, loose-
knit family which surrounds her,
reflecting the problems, aspira-
tions and culture of those in the
ghetto existence."
The festival, will also include
the University Dancers presenta-
tion of "Dance Concert Week-
end I."
This program will include
numbers performed by the Uni-
versity's elect modern dance
company "Concert Dance The-
ater," the "Just Moving Com-
pany," an African dance and
modern dance group, Nancy Car-
roll Abbey and Pauline Soffa in
a ballet pas de deux, and Gay
Delanghe of the Lucas Hoving
Dance Company of New York.
* * .
The festival is sponsoring a
Photography Contest, open to
all students, faculty, and Uni-
versity staff. Photographs must
be submitted to UAC offices by
Friday, March 31. Entries will
be displayed in the UAC Stu-
dent Gallery, first floor, Michi-
gan Union, from March 29-
April 1. Following judging, en-
tries will be displayed in the
Graduate Library from April 2
through April 21.
In addition to the Creative
Arts Festival, Ann Arbor con-
tinues to offer a wide variety of
cultural activities.
ART GALLERIES:
Measured Space Series, a dis-
play, of paintings and graphics
by David Rubello, will be shown
at the Pyramid Gallery, 109 N.
Main, oMnday 11-9 and Tues-
day-Saturday 10:30-5:30 through
April 1.
MILAN I, a display of photo-
graphs, photo-silkscreens a n d
drawings by John Pierce, will
be shown at the Ecology Center
of Ann Arbor. The show is an
introduction to MILAN I, an
audio-visual experience designed
to accelerate man's environmen-
- tal awareness, scheduled for
March, 1973.-
1972 Undergraduate Art Show
will be displayed in the third
floor Rackham Galleries from
8-11, Monday through Saturday
until April 1.

THEATRE
Two Spanish -one-act plays,
"El amor de Don Perlimplin con
Bekisa en su jardin," by Federi-
co Garcia Lorca and "El La-
berinto" by Fernando Arrabal
will be presented by the Dept.
of Romance Languages tonight
at 8:30 and tomorrow at 2:30
and 8:30 at the Lydia Mendels-
sohn Theatre. Tickets may be
purchased for $2, $1.50, and $1.
Antigone, by Jean Anouilh,
will be presented by the Ann
Arbor Civic Theatre tonight
through Saturday at 8 p.m. and
Sunday at 7 p.m. in the True-
blood Auditorium. Tickets are
available at the box office.
The Juilliard Repertory Com-
pany, brought here by the Uni-
versity Professional Theatre
Program, will present Women
Beware Women, by Thomas
Middleton, Interview by Jean
Claude van Itallie and The In-
dian Wants the Bronx by Israel
Horowitz this Friday and Sat-
urday at 8 p.m. in the Men-

delssohn Theatre. Tickets may
be purchased at the Mendels-
sohn box office.
* * *
Upcoming on April 1 will be
what might be the biggest cul-
ture event of the year - The
Ann Arbor Hash Festival.
Scheduled for 2:00 on the
Diag on Saturday April Fools
Day, the Hash Festival will cele-
brate the coming of Spring, Ap-
ril Fools Day, the new State
dope law, and the beginning of
the last month of classes.
People are expected to come
from all over the state bringing
wine, musical instruments, and,
of course, Hash.
* * *
First Annual Women's 8 and
Super 8mm Film Festival and
Workshops, co-sponsored by the
Ann Arbor Women's Film Col-
lective and the Bloomington
Feminist Film Collective in con-
junction with the Ann Arbor Film
Cooperative's 8mm Festival, will
be presented Friday at 8 p.m. at

the School of Education Bldg.
The evening will include work-
shops on film-making techniques,
feminist film criticism, and
forming film collectives.
On Call, the University Medi-
cal School Glee Club's annual
concert, featuring classical, light
and country rock music, will be
presented on March 28 at 8:00
at Trueblood Auditorium. Ad-
mission $1.
4th annual WABX Balloon and
Kite Fly is scheduled to begin
at noon Sunday. This yearly
event is held on the last Sunday
in March and officially marks
the start of the spring session.
* * *
Ars Musica will give its fourth
program of the season in two
performances Sunday at 4 p.m.
and on Monday at 8 p.m. at
the St. Claire's Episcopal
Church. This !is a change from
the time originally scheduled.
Season tickets will be good for
either performance.
e -
SProj ectBurrito
A Mexican Diinner
DATE:
SUNDAY,
March 26th
PLACE:
331 THOMPSON ST.
ANN ARBOR
TIME:
O 5:30 p.m.
BENEFIT:
0 Chicano Legal Defense Fund
Sponsored by: T.R.-Chicano U
of M Social Work Student Org.
DONATION $2.25 (
"O

11

"Full of funny, macabre
bits ... The best of the
Urban Life lampoons
I've seen."
-Michigan Daily
SHOCKINGi
FUNNY!
VERY ADULT!

Corner of State & Liberty
r TATE
Program information 662-6264

V
Y :

"AN OVERGROUND
SEX-PROTEST FILM!"
.-Archler Winston, Now York NOs

4

DIAL 668-6416
HELD OVER!
TWO HIT
ENCORES
NOMINATED
FOR
ACADEMY
AWARDS
"Summer of '42"
BEST EDITING
BEST SCREENPLAY
BEST PHOTOGRAPHY
BEST SCORE
AND
JANE DONALD
FONDA SUTHERLAND
klute a
JANE FONDA
BEST ACTRESS
BEST SCREENPLAY

DISCUSSION AND SLIDES ON
PRE-INCA AND INCA ART
presented by JIM BENNET
AND
PERUVIAN DINNER
THURSDAY, MARCH 23--630 p.m.
Ecumenical Center--921 Church Street
Reservations must be made by March 22 v
Call-Days 662-5529 Nights 763-6213 Cost $1.00
2 BIG HITS-3 DAYS ONLY!

4i

OPEN 12:45
Shows at 1, 3, 5, 7, 9 P.M.

11

SCREENPLAY Y CHARLES H ISC.AML RtANO E MA ' i'l - .. RIA' 'fW AAW RUI~CEOb Y CHARES HIRSCH
*a wt: tM. FILMS PW)WCTAR*k .1ofSOGMA I: RPt ASf -IN COLO*
YOU MUST BE 18

"ONE OF THE
FUNNIEST,
HIPPEST,
MOST
AUDACIOUS
AMERICAN
COMEDIES
OF THE
TEAR!"
-JosephGelmis,
Newsday
FROM THE GROOVY GUYS
WHOROUGHT YOU
"GREETtNGS"

Hi, Morn!

HILLEL AND MIDRASHA COLLEGE OF JEWISH STUDIES
present
Prof. Eliezer Berkovits
Hebrew Theological College.
SPEAKING ON
"The Jewish-Christian Dialogue Today"
TONIGHT at 8:30 P.M.{
at HILLEL, 1429 Hill Street

ROBERT DE NIRO co-staing JENNIFER SALT. GERRIT GRAHAM wr~h RUTH ALDA. ALLEN GARrELD
Screenplay by BRIAN DE PALMA Based on an onqgat story by CHARLES HISCH and BRIAN DE PALMA
Produced by CHARLES HIRSCH -Directed by BRIAN DE PALMA- AvEST END FILMS PRODUCTION
COLOR -"ASIGMA III X RELEASE
" "Greetings"-7 & 10
DOWNTOWN"ANN ARBOR Hi Mom"-8:30

-

JOHN MONTGOMERY
assistant to the secretary for the Dept. of HEW
Workfare and Welfare Reform
Thursday, March 23 3:15 P.M.

i
I
i
i
t
I

THE SCHOOL OF MUSIC presents
Verdi's Opera
FAL STAFF
(IN ENGLISH)
Two Performances Only: April 6 & 7-8 P.M.
Power Center for the Performing Arts
$3.50 and $2.50 ($1.00 tickets for U-M students with
ID cards, sold at the Box Office only, no mail orders)
Conductor JOSEF BLATT Stage Director: RALPH HERBERT
TICKET INFORMATION: 764-6118
MAIL ORDERS: Falstaff, School of Music, University of Mich-
igan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48105. Please enclose self-addressed,
stamped envelope.
Box Office Opens April 3rd at 12:30 P.M

L--

LAW CLUB LOUNGE

.1

POCKET BILLIARDS
"ITS WORTH LEARNING"
Free Instructions
Thursday 7-9 P.M.
MICH. UNION

FLARES
Your
Choice
$5
reg. to $24

1972 UNDERGRAD
ART SHOW
3rd Floor
Rackham Galleries
MONDAY thru SATURDAY
8 A.M.-11 P.M.
Until April 1st
This ad compliments of
Quarry Photo Inc.

TODAY-Wednesday, March 22
HEAR at 4:00 p.m.
Professor David Berger
Brooklyn College
on
"The Christian Critique of the Talmud and
the Jewish Critique of the New Testament"
in
Angell Hall Auditorium A
THE OFFICE OF RELIGIOUS AFFAIRS
THE PROGRAM IN RELIGIOUS STUDIES
B'NAI B'RITH HILLEL FOUNDATION

State Street at Liberty

7

rr.-.lr MICHIGNN

L

MARCH ART FAIR
WHEN: Sunday, March 26, 12-6 P.M.
WHERE: Michigan Union Ballroom
WHAT: Artists Displaying and Selling Their Crafts
WHO: Onen to Evervone. No Admsinon Charna

1 -0 REM.-W-Mill

M ~-**W 0 w

's

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