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February 24, 1972 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1972-02-24

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Page Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Respects
By ANITA CRONE Last Res
While most 21-year-olds are TheatreI
struggling to complete academic Play Proj
requirements at theaUniversity, at Mende
Danny Lipman has already had scheduled
two plays professionally pro- day.
duced - including the current When It
Professional Theatre Program had just
production of Last Respects- rehearsal+
and is writing a third. - vey Medli
Lipman is this year's Shubert Nichols o
Theatre Foundation Fellow, and Broadway
as such the University's play- "My wo
wright -in-regsdence. Lipman sa
A personable brown - haired the direc
dark-eyed student, Lipman has
always been intensely interestedk
in the Theatre, which he refers '
to with a capital ','V" He enter-...
ed Boston University as an un
dergraduatemajoring in direct-
ing, switched to acting and F
emerge finally as a playwright.
He-. is totally involved in the <
Theatre. It's an all consuming'
thing yet- does not limit him.
"I'm basically a loner, and bas
ically'a theatre' person," he says z
Yet still, he considers himself
a flexible person. "I'm willing toW
change, not"only for a director
but for" an audience;" he' ex- D
plains. The play is written and Da
born as rather a delicate thing, asked tha
and as such it can die. To pre- worked."
vent that you have to be able and now
to chailge. '

to

spects, the Profes
Program's 1972
ject, will open t
lssohnTheatre a
to run through
talked with Lipm
left his first w
of the play with
nsky, assistant to
n, several Neil
hits.
rds are not immo
aid after workin
tor who had a

Lipmun
sional from the flops that I've seen thah
New the hits."
onight "Ann Arbor and the fellowship
and is have given me time to concen-
iSun- trate and to write, Lipman says.
'Heis now:working on a new play
an, he -or .a least thinking about it.
orking "It takes me two or three
aHar- nonths to think out a play be-
Mike fore I sit';down and write it on
Simon paper," he says.
Coming from the east, Lipman
)rtal," betrays a prejd- ice towards New
Swith York and Boston as the national
beady cultural centers. "Regional the-
atre is where it's happening," he
'.. admits. "but 'the companies are
,~in New -York."
"Although' there is a lot of The-
atrehere in the midwest, it is'
x unfortunate that a:lot of that
Theatre is 'bus and truck tours.'
Theatre will take a long time to
diversify itself geographically
_.Lipman sums up his own bio-
graphicalinformation by saying
that "If one.is to be an artist,
he must not. restrict, himself."
"After acting, one's insight in-
to directing increases. I feel that
my most important. artistic ob-
ligation is to.write for the The-
atre. It is the playwrights re-
sponsibility to experiment with
be re- the stage and express himself in
a play new forms."
he di- "An art form exists on its
artists' searching. If playwrights
tre as continue to search, the Theatre
'There will continue to remain exciting
time. and rich."

By CAROL DUNITZ
Last night marked the opening
of this year's MUSKET produc-
tion Funny Girl, a play about
the memorable life and career
of Fanny Brice-her rise to fame
and romance with Nicky Arn-
stein.
The play began in a sloppy
manner and the first act really
dragged. However, after inter-
mission, the cast quickly shaped
up and the rest of the evening
proceeded at a lively pace.
The biggest disappointment in
the play is the lead performer.
If you can imagine Fanny Brice
without a voice, then you might
to be able to reconcile Constance
Meng in the role. Frankly, I
can't. Her technical skills are

good, but she is not believable.
Offsetting her porformance are
the two male leads, Ken Mar-
shall as Nicky Arnstein, and
Bruce Kent, as Eddie Ryan. Both
have good voices and project
well. They are true to life . . .
and Eddie's pretty good hoofer,
too.
As far as dancing goes, the
team Barb Canner and Phil
Dombrowski deserve mention-I
wish I could have seen more of
them. The choreography was ter-
rific and all of the scenes, in-
cluding the chorus, were spec-
tacular. The rendition of "Rat,
Tat, Tat Tat" is particularly
impressive. Meng does do a fine
job here.
Also of note is Patty Gold's

interpretation of Mrs. Starkosh.
She and her card group add a
real highlight to the musical.
At times, the direction seemed
aw kw a rd. Makram Jonbran
should have been able to do more
with timing and pace. Sometimes
the reactions between players
just did not click.
Technically, the play is beau-
tiful. The number of sets is ex-
traordinary. And they're wonder-
ful. Lighting is good, too. And
costumes are enchantingly remi-
niscent of a by-gone era.
Despite it's initial slow-mov-
ing moments, this musical
comedy was, all in all, enjoy-
able. It ended well, and if the
presentation maintains a quick
pace, it will provide a good eve-
ning of entertainment.

A fair Funny Girl

Foon's drama"
Three short plays written by
Dennis Foon will be presented
tonight, tomorrow night and bz
urday at 7:00 in the East Quad
Auditorium as part of the Resi-
dential College Creative Arts1
Festival. Admission is free.
6th WEEK NOW!
At State and Liberty
Program information 662-6264

Thursday, February 24, 1972
RES. COLLEGE O
O CREATIVE ARTS
FESTIVAL
FREE
FOON
0- -
3 original plays
- 7 p.m.
THURS., FEB. 24
FRI., FEB. 25
SAT., FEB. 26,
Quad Aud. FREE!

I

OPEN 1 p.m. SHOWS AT
1:15-3:10-5-7-9 P.M.
Feature Starts 5 min. later

I1

.rueggen and Ghiglia

nny Lipman
t certain scenes
"I have writtenF
the actors And t
kIf -0na

The University Musical Society
presented Oscar Ghiglia, Italian
guitarist, and Frans Brieggan,
Dutch recorder player, In a pro-
gram in Rackham last night.
The juxtaposition of these two
artists made for a more interest-
ing evening than either could
have provided separately.
On one hand we heard skilled
if somewhat pedestrian render-
ings of Bach, Ponce, De Falla
and Villa Lobos by Ghiglia, dur-
ing which my attention fre-

quently wandered. There was
no real communication as Ghi-
glia, with little change of ex-
pression, went from one piece to
another.
Countering this were eloquent
readings of Van Eyck, Berio and
Telemann by Brueggen. A de-
tailed explanation of the Berio,
plus sensitivity in phrasing and
color, created rapport and sus-
tained my interest as Ghiglia,
for all his fine workmanship,
failed to do.
-D.P.S.

The Place To Meet
INTERESTING People
Bach Club
Paulus Hofheimer
Ensemble
5 VOCALISTS-4 RECORDERS
4 CRUMHORNS-1 CORNETTO
1 VIOLA DE GAMBA
I HARPSICHORD

"IT'S A SIZZLER"
-Detroit News
"ONE OF THE
YEAR'S TEN BEST"
-Time
"The best American
movie of the last six
months."

I

"Come on like gangbust-
ers . . . I doubt if you'll
s e e anything q u it e as
devGstoting.
-Michigan Daily

P'anwsort
y RICHARD WALLIS
A performance by the Korean
p'an-sori roupe tomorrow night
at Rackham Auditorium will be
the second East Asian theatrical
event sponsored this season by
the TUniversity. Musical Society.
The. Asian series is offering, in
p'an-sori, another example of
narrative music-drama, a form
widespread, in parts of Asia yet
still. rarely .exposed to western
audiences..
Tr'aditional epic, religious, and
romantic tales and poetry form
the core repertoire of these the-
atresewhich are most often pro-
ducts of oral composition.
Although the troupe is titled
"P'an-sori," vocal drama will
comprise. only half of tomorrow's
concert.- Several' other types of
Korean; vocal and instrumental.
forms are -.on the program, in-
cluding classical court chamber
music; traditional folk songs, and
solo instrumental pieces.
Two p'an-sorl stories complete
the :program. Five different tales
of this nature: are' currently per-
formed:in Korea, each based on
a Confucian rethical relationship:
king-subject, father-child, hus-
band 'Wife,' brother - brother,
friend-friend.
Each has one performer con-
sidered as its specialist, and
Madame Kim, 'So-hee, the solo
perforner' tomorrow, is famous
for .her portrayal of a' loyal
daughter in the story of "Shim-
See P'AN-SORI, Page 10

rector wil ta e over.
Lipman views the Thea
an area of compromise."
are no playwrights at this

I

UA-Daystar Present
ALICE
COLTRANE
LEON
THOMAS-
Con tpmporary
fJazz' Quintet
MARCH 17, FRIDAY
8 p.m. Hill Aud.
2.00 - 350 - 4.00 - 4.50
Reserved Seats Now On Sale
Mich. Union 12-6 p.m. M-F

It is the director and the actors
that do the play. A play is not
meant to be read, but to be seen
as a finished product."
Praising the fellowship pro-
gram, Lipman mentioned that
this is one of the few universi-
ties that gives a playwright a
"good solid produduction of his
play." As he literally played on
the unfinished set for Last Re-
spects, Lipman emphasizes that
the young playwright must be
given the opportunity to bring
his ideas to the Theatre. "These
chances are not going to be given
in New York-there they want to
see the pinnacle. They are not
open to experimentation, unless
it has been proven that it can
work."
Experimentation is important
to Lipman. "I've learned more

Refreshments: Wines
and Cheeses
South Quad, W. Lounge
Feb. 24, Thursday
8 P.M.
Absolutely Everyone Invited.
No Musical Knowledge Needed.
For Further Info:
763-6256 or 663-4875
Subscribe to
The Michigan Daily

DIRTY,
HARRY

TONIGHT AT 8

LOW PRICES

DIAL 5-6290
ENDING TONIGHT
All they wanted
was their Chance
to be men..,
and he gave it
to them.

1

4/711

Wrrc1F

'STANLEY KRAMER'S
SH IP OF
FOOLS"
STOCKWELL HALL
9 P.M.
THURS,, FRI., SAT.
75c

SHOWS AT:
1:15-3:45-6:15-8:50
FEATURE AT:
1:30-4:00-6:30-9:00

THE PRAGUE SYMPHONY OR(
JINDRICH ROBAN, conductor
t
and
THE FESTIVAL CHORUS O
UNIVERSITY CHORAL UIN

CHESTRA

._

w

PRESENTS
A WEEK LONG FESTIVAL
OF THE FILMS OF
Ernst Lubitsch
TONIGHT ONLY FRIDAY ONLY
Note Change TROUBLE IN
'of Schedule!
PARADISE
LADY:Dir. Ernst Lubitsch, 1932.
DIfEME Chic KaywFrancis gets mix-
WRE'Suu.uL ed up w it h con artist
couple. Herbert :Marshall
and M i r i a m Hopkins in
Paris. A fast moving, beau-
tifully timed c o m e d y of
Dir. Ernst Lubitsch, 1925 manners and errors as only
Lubtsch can do it.
Adapted from a play by
PLUS A SHORT
OSCARwwwIDE ' BY KEATON
Lubitsch translates. Wilde's
litegrry husmori i srI~*Wualf

r

t' '
'te
4"

AIIII

"A DELIGHTFUL COMEDY!"
(Geo. White-Head, Eugene O'Neill Foundation)
4 PERFORMANCES 2:30
Thurs.-Sun., Feb. 24-27 Sun. Mat.

I

DIAL
5-6290

John Wayne
i ENDS TONIGHT
in
"The Cowboys"

fl

8:00
p.m.

-

STARTS TOMORROW!

4 ;

'II

tI

1l

'i Lu 1 l jill.

4

F THE
ION

DONALD BRYANT, chorus-master
The Prague Symphony Orchestra, one of Europe's finest orchestras, comes
to Ann Arbor for a concert on Sunday evening, February 27. Founded in 1934,
the Prague Symphony has become an inseparable part
of the cultural life of that city, and represents Czech music in many parts of the world.
Under the baton of Jindrich Rohan, the orchestra will open its program with
"Vox Clamantis" by Petr Eben. The Festival Chorus of the University Choral Union
then joins the orchestra in Smetana's "Czech Song," followed after intermission
by Dvorak's Symphony No. 5 in F major.
Performance in Hill Auditorium at 8:30-tickets from $2.50 to $7
'WI'vE SITY
CliNTTI Ti I T J TI Yy

jW

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