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February 22, 1972 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1972-02-22

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

/

P'age Etgit

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

i 1uesday, February 22, 1912

RESEARCH PLAN

Faculty to work with Regents

Improvement seen for
school reform project

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN
-l---r --:" --.}t-::--.-- -----

(Continued from Page 1)
Assembly meeting in an attemptI
to explain the Regents' actions to
the faculty.
"This is the first time there has
been this much of a disagreement
between the faculty and the Re-
gents," he said.
The Regents' statement, instead
of providing for specific accept-
ance, or rejection of the sub-
stance of Assembly's plan, includ-
ed the following four provisions:
-The principal objections to
the present classified research re-
strictions relate to the difficulty
of administering them, notin the
policies themselves. The Regents
called for change in the direction
Peking trip
draws mixed
statements
(Continued from Page 1)
vast. differences and you should
not expect that much."
However, he said he "thought
the premier of China reached out
quite far in terms of opening a
dialogue of normalization between
our two countries."
Some of the strongest praise
came from leaders of Nixon's own
party.
"Seldom has there been an event
signifying a more profound step
in the efforts of man to fulfill the
potentials of his civilization," said
Republican national chairman Sen.
Robert Dole (R-Kan.).
The Democrats, though, also
commented on the trip. Senate Ma-
jority Leader Mike Mansfield (D-
Mont.) said that while he did not
expect anything of substance, to
come out of the meetings, "the
first step has been taken" for
improved relationships between the
two nations.
Dems to set
city platf orm
The Ann Arbor Democratic Party
will adopt its 1972 platform at its
regular monthly meeting tonight.
The party's platform committee,
headed by Alvin Kaufman, will
bring up issues for discussion,
amendment and possible inclusion
in the final platform.
The meeting will begin at 8 p.m.
'in the Ann Arbor Public Library
meeting room. The public is in-
vitdd.

of a simpler mechanism, not nec-
essarily in the mechanisms them-
selves;
-The Willow Run Laboratories,
the site of the majority of the
University's classified research,
will be phased out by the end of
the year:
-Any classified research poli-
cies should not also include indus-
trially sponsored proprietary re-
search. Assembly's proposed poli-
cies covered both types of re-
search; and
-The executive officers will
work with SACUA, Assembly and
Student Government Council to
accommodate the problems men-
tioned.
Fleming said, "I don't believe
the Regents understand the com-
plexity of the issue." He said he
thought they did not fully under-
stand the research policies sub-
mitted to them by Assembly, SGC,
and a group of faculty called the
Faculty Reform Coalition.
He said the Regents considered
themselves to have the final say
in University affairs, even though
"they respect the views of the
faculty."
He said he thought, however,
that a solution could be accom-
plished through negotiation.
Anton, disagreed with Fleming's
views. He said he thought the
central issue involved was not the
research policies themselves, but
rather regental rejection of a fac-
Nvew arson
l e n" L b ~ 7NI') Wh -NO 0

ulty proposal.
"What use is Assembly," he
said, "If its actions can so easily
be set aside by the Regents? We
have here the important issue of
faculty participation in Univer-
sity governance."
Economics Prof. Frederic Scher-
er later moved for the body to
"defer implementation" of pro-
cedures for several committees
which would function in the pro-
posed Office of Budgets and Plan-
ning in the President's office.
According to Scherer, the object
of the move was not to affect the
committee themselves, but to in-
dicate a show of faculty power to
the Regents. The motion was nar-
rowly defeated.
"We have very little power per
se," he said. "One of our powers
is to couple actions."
There was also speculation that
Assembly might vote in favor of
faculty collective bargaining as a
means of dealing with the Re-
gents, but the body will not dis-
cuss the issue until its March
meeting.
Philosophy Prof. Carl Cohen
agreed with Scherer, saying, "The
flat rejection of Assembly's pro-
posal and the aroma which ex-
udes from the Regents' statement
is almost calculated to disrupt
negotiations between the faculty
and administiation on other is-
sues."
LSA board
starts meetings

(Continued from Page 1)
view, have crippled the project so
far.
These programs include:
-A minimum of three half-days
set aside each month byall teach-
ers and administration staff to
discuss racial, religious, class, sex,
and individual human differences";
-A plan, to be submitted by each
school in the system, detailing
curriculum changes intended to
widen student's multi-racial ex-
Tax fails in
eity election
(Continued from Page 1)
south voted mostly against the
city income tax.
In the central campus area west
of Thompson St. however the vote
favored the tax.
The heavily student seventh pre-
cinct of the fourth ward was the
only precinct in the ward to give
a majority to Steingold in the Re-
publican race and Everett in the
Democratic race. Both candidates
were considered to be the most
liberal in their respective contests.
For the rest of the electorate,
however, yesterday's contest pro-
vided no surprises. The income
tax had been opposed by both the
right and left ends of the political
spectrum and seemed doomed long
before yesterday's balloting.
Also, the three primary winners
-Benner, Walz, and Modgis-were
all considered to be the candidates
of the "party regulars."
The following Daily reporters
contributed,to yesterday's elec-
tion coverage: David Burhenn,
Zachary Schiller, and Charles
Stein.

periences;
-The assessment starting .next
year of racial attitudes of all
school system employes as part
of annual evaluations; and
-The hiring of human relations
workers, assigned to secondary
schools, to prevent current inci-
dents of harassment in lavatories
and hallways.
To implement the changes dur-
ing the remaifider of the current
school year, McPherson has order-
ed a moratorium on capital out-
lays -- expenses incurred from
maintenance and purchase of
school equipment - in order to
make the money saved available
to schools for the project.
Funding originally included $2,500
voted directly to the project with
some funds from other sources.
LSA science
dean chosen
Physics Prof. Samuel Krimm has
been appointed associate dean for
science education and research in
the literary college.
Krimm succeeds botany Prof.
Alfred Sussman, who plans to con-
tinue teaching, and research.
Krimm is also the spokesman
for the research task force of the
Faculty Reform Coalition, which
organized last year to conduct
independent studies of campus
issues.
Krimm came to the University
in 1952 and was promoted to the
position of assistant professor in
1954. He received master's and
doctoral degrees from Princeton
University.

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 22
Day Calendar
Physics Talk: A. Krisch, "How Struc-
ture Functions are Obtained from In-
elastic F-p Experiments," 2038 Randall,
11 am.
Computing Ctr. Short Course: "La-
beled Tape Processing in MTS," 110
Physics-Astronomy Bldg., 3-5 pm.
LSA Coffee Hour: 2549 LSA Bldg., 3
pm.
Computer & Comm. Sciences Collo-
quium: P. Fischer, "Fashionable Trends
and Unfashionable Problems in Com-
plexity Theory," 3036 Frieze, 4 pm.
Physics Seminar: L. Sklar, "Statis-
tical Explanation & Statistical Phys-
ics," P&A Colloq. Rm., 4 pm.
Dental Research Inst.: G. Gibbons,
Forsyth Dental Ctr., Boston, "Adhesion
and Ecology of Plaque," 2033 Kellogg,
5 pm.
Music School: The Stanley Quartet,
Rackham Aud., 8 pm.
Music School: University Jazz Band,

I

Hill Aud., 8 pm.
Placement Service
SUMMER PLACEMENT
INTERVIEW
Camp Maplehurst, Mich.,.Coed, inter-
view Fri., Feb. 25, 1:30-5 pm.; water-
front, arts and crafts, riding, water
skiing, gen. counselors; call 763-4117.
INTERVIEW
Miss Liberty, London, England, inter-
view Wed., Feb. 23, 3:30-5 pm.; must be
able to type; further details available.
INTERVIEW
Camne Tamarack, Fresh Air Society,
Detroit, interview Thurs., Feb. 24, 9:30-
5 pm; gen. counselors, specialists in
waterfront, arts and crafts, supervisors
and service 'staff, nature campcraft,
trippers, drama/dance, truck-bus driv-
er (21); phone 763-4117.
INTERVIEW :
Lannon Fields Farms Camp, Wiscon-
son, Girls, interview Thurs., Feb. 24,
10-5 pm.; waterfront, arts and crafts,
riding (English) ,drama/dance.

TV & Stereo Rentals
$10.00 per month
NO DEPOSIT
FREE DELIVERY, PICK UP
AND SERVICE
CALL:
NEJAC TV RENTALS
662-5671
Rap Groups
on Lesbianism
" IF you have been think-
a b b u t lesbianism or
trying not to.

'S
V

Bursley Residents
WE'D LIKE TO MEET YOU!
TUES., FEB. 22-7 p.m. West Lounge
BUSINESS STAFF

*IF your friend, lover,
roommate, sister,
child, or mother is gay
and you'd like to talk
about it.
0IF y o u are a lesbian
and wont to talk about
roles and relationships
or just socialize with
your sisters.
CALL US. A number of rap
groups are being formed
Call the
Gay Advocates Office
Cyndi, '763-4186
AFTERNOONS

COME TO A

11

(pepoiah

InerI

III

IL L IUtt 1 (CIq ( ontinued from Page 1)
be only as effective as it is per-
suasive.
A fire broke out in a storage Comie.
area on the fifth floor of Bursley Committee members are appoint-
Halle terd f f oed-students by the literary college
THalestday. she tstudent government, and faculty
The incident 15 the 25th fire on members by the college's faculty
campus since late January. ebody.
According to Battalion Chief body._
Russel Downing of the Ann Arbor
Fire Department, the fire caused
some smoke and water damage Forest fires burn
to the North Campus dorm.m
City police andfire officials are o t r
continuing their month-long invest-
igation of alleged arson on cam-
pus.
Witnesses at the scene of a fire
in Betsy Barbour Hall on Saturday
described a "suspicious looking""
youth outside the building at the
time of the incident. Police have
compiled the descriptions and are
investigating the lead.
The fire on Saturday caused
minor damage to the basement
laundry room. The fire was ap-
parently set in a laundry hamper,,
destroying three other hampers
and scorching a door.

- and
DISCUSSION OF PERSIAN ART AND MOSAICS
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 24-6:30 P.M.
COST: $1.00
ECUMENICAL CAMPUS CENTER, 921 Church Street
RESERVATIONS MUST BE IN WEDNESDAY, FEB. 23rd
CALL 662-5529 DAYS; 763-6213 NIGHTS

For the Student Body:
SALE.

I

Last Weekend Trip-Feb. 25-27
t tCuWESTERN, PENNSYLVANIA
Contact DAVE, 764-4606
Meeting Tonight at 7:00 p.m.-3532 SAB
$180-$195 (includes food, lodging, trans. and lifts)
Meeting Tonight at 8:00 p.m.-3524 SAB
Contact CATHY, 769-0813 or BRAD, 449-2688

" Jeans
" Bells
" Flares

TODAY AT 12 NOON
Hear visiting theologian,
DR. SAMUEL KEEN'
"the disembodied physician: treating the disease
process versus the patient"
Medical Public Forum Lecture
MAIN AMPHITHEATER
on 6th Level in University Hospital
Office of Religious Affajrs-

2 off

CHECKMATE-
State Street at Liberty
Read and Use
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41

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