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February 22, 1972 - Image 7

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1972-02-22

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Tuesday,'Pebiuary 2 , 1972

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Seven

Tuesday, February 22, 1972 THE MICHIGAN DAILY

v

joel greer "
T'he Coliseu m:
It's getting too old
SITTING COMFORTABLY in the press facility at Michigan
Toth's fresh new Student Ice Arena a week ago, one could
only wonder why a hockey team of Michigan's outstanding'
tradition has been forced to endure that rundown rink on Hill
Street affectionately known as the Michigan Coliseum.
With so many new arenas springing up around the Western
Collegiate Hockey Association, It's time to treat hockey at Mich-
igan like the first-class sport it really it.
Of the ten conference schools, only Michigan, Michi-
gan State and North Dakota occupy antiquated structures.
But after the. next few years Michigan will be the only
school with such a problem.
Michigan. Tech moved into its new structure over a month
ago, while a new rink at Grand Forks will be ready at the start
of "next season. Michigan State's building should be completed
within two years.
But in a time when every financial move at a major uni-
versity is questioned, funding a new hockey arena would draw
opposition from many circles. Realistically, while Wolverine
hockey is presently not a money-making sport, a new structure
here could eventually pay for itself and make Michigan hockey
sel .supporting.
Michigan Tech hockey coach John Maclnnes, who was
an iuportant consultant. in the Houghton arena venture,
fi9*iie that a building with a 6,000 seating capacity would
beco ne profitable in the long run.
Tech's new structure, built for $2.2 million and containing
2,990 seats, proves that an adequate facility can be cdnstructed
with reasonable costs. Long range plans call for the Student
Ice A ,ena to eventually expand to a seating capacity of 5,800.
Building such an arena here would be beneficial on at least
three counts. Not only would the hockey fans get a chance to
see .a game without peering around posts, but the players and
the regular student body would appreciate the new facility.
At Michigan Tech, both benches are surrounded with
tall glass barriers, thus keeping confrontations with the very
partisan crowds at a minimum. Michigan coach Al Renfrew
is especially pleased with the Houghton set-up, noting that
it is nearly impossible for the players to hear the usual
verbal abuse on the bench. In recent years, scattered violence
between players and fans has occurred, creating an un-
comfortable atmosphere for all. With the new arrangement,
thesi confrontations are now practically impossible.
While Michigan's dressing rooms are adequate, Tech's are
superb. "They're better than a professional teams'," explains
Renfrew. With facilities like this, hockey instruction is greatly
maximized by the coaching staff.
Recruiting is also a factor. With .both Tech and State of-
fering such facilities, Renfrew's bargaining power without a
new building will naturally decrease. In fact, the Wolverines'
problems the last two seasons can almost be traced to this
reason.
Placing everything else aside, the student body could
perhaps benefit the most from such an investment. Agoord-
ing to Renfrew, the Coliseum is the most used building on
campus. "What other building is going from morning to
night?" asks Renfrew. And with the proper facilities, a new
rink could operate 24 hours daily.
Spots on the few IM team rosters are so limited that one
practically has to be an heir to get a place on a squad. With
such a building, Renfrew says that an IM leaune could be built
up to nearly 40 teams, thrus allowing everyone a' chance to play.
The female students also benefit from a new arena. Many
more hours of figure skating instruction and free skating would
bedprovided, thus giving the many skaters in Ann Arbor a better
opportunity to skate.
ut not everybody skates at Michigan and not everybody is
a foekey fan. So simply putting up a hockey structure would
be"inadequate to meet the current University needs. As was
plnned back in the days when both Renfrew and MacInnes
were Wolverine players, a new basketball arena, hockey rink and
I.M. building were to be erected all under one roof.
Now that the Athletic Department blew the whole thing
4 by wasting $9 million on "plush" Crisler Arena, the only
answer :left is to build a hockey-gymnasium complex. This
whole problem would have been solved a few years ago, but

for some reason Fritz Crisler decided that hockey and
basketball could not be played in the same arena. Strangely
enough, at the same time Madison Square Garden in New
Yor: *as constructed so that a complete changeover could
be made in a couple of hours.
The Canham regime should learn from this blunder and
realize that a multi-sports center can be built for far less money.
Incidentally, Crisler Arena, using pre-cast materials, could have
been built 'for no more than $4.5 million, cutting the present
cost in half.
There has been some talk of moving the hockey team into
equally old Yost Fieldhouse. By the time the ice plant is trans-
ferred and the structure is renovated, costs would zoom even
higher than they would in building a completely new structure.
Then, Athletic Director Canham would be forced to relocate th'e
track team, thus making that plan senseless.
A sound plan has not yet been presented, and it seems
like the Michigan Coliseum will be the Wolverines' home for
some time to come.
The Michigan hockey team, winners of more national champ-
ionships than any other school, deserves a much better fate.

Minnesota

By BOB HEUER
A weekend of Big Ten basket-
ball action, which pitted the con-
ference leaders against the weak
sisters, produced some surprising-
ly close contests and an unex-
pected loss for favorite Ohio
State.
Co-leader Minnesota and Mich-
igan, a half-step off the pace,
both had their hands full before
pulling out victories over Wis-
consin and Northwestern respec-
tively; while the faltering Buck-
eyes blew numerous second half
leads in bowing to Illinois in
Champaign, 64-62.
Ohio State (7-3) is now a full
game back of Minnesota and half
a game behind the Wolverines.
Coach Fred Taylor didn't think
the loss kayoed his team's title
chances. "I hope this won't elimi-,
nate us, but no team can afford
the luxury of a loss now," com-
mented Taylor.
Ohio State's victory hopes went
out the window Saturday when,
facing a one point deficit with
four second left on the clock, an
inbound pass sailed over the heads
of Alan Hornyak and Jack Wolfe
and out of bounds.
The game was actually decided
at the foul line, where Illinois
converted 34 of 46 free throws
while the Bucks hit a measley 12
of 28.
Minnesota's rookie coach Bill
Musselman also expressed doubt
as to the final outcome of .the

('ally
sports
NIGHT EDITOR:
BOB McGINN
title chase along with unbridled
glee at the demise of the Gophers
lead co-holders and part-tim
punching bags from Columbus. "
jumped up and down at my hous
when I saw Ohio State get bea
on television," said an ecstati
Musselman. "'This race is going
down to the wire. It's going to be
tough."
The Gophers blew a 12 poin
lead against Wisconsin, but hel
on to pull out a 76-73 win on the
strength of Clyde Turner's 29
points and some clutch foul
shooting by Dave, Winfield. Th
latter hit four important fre
throws in the last two minutes to
stifle a Wisconsin rally.
For Michigan, it was a case o
having little more than enough
Satuiday night in Evanston. Th
Wolverines suffered througha
lackluster performance agains
Northwestern, but fortunately, th
opposition was just a little bi
worse,

apture
The last-place Wildcats played
Michigan even for most of the
game, outshooting the Wolver-
ines 31.6 per cent to 29.7 per cent
in a miserable first half exhibi-
tion. Only a three-point play by
Henry Wilmore followed by six
unanswered points in the last
three minutes put the game out of
reach.
In other Big Ten action, Pur-
due shot a torrid 54 per cent- in
"d burying Michigan State, 92-68.
s' MSU's Mike Robinson, the Big
e Ten's new scoring leader, tallied
I 27 points to lead both teams. But
e the Boilermaker duo of Bill
t Franklin and Bob Ford more than
tc offset Robinson's efforts, hitting
g 22 and 19 points respectively.
e Indiana remained tied with
Purdue for fourth place in the
t conference with an 86-79 win over
A Iowa. Kevin Kunnert lead all
e scorers with 34 points, but John
9 Ritter's career high of 32 spark-.

lead

ed the Hoosiers' victory.
In upcoming games, Minnesota
invades Ar Arbe 'is Saturday
Tickets taken'
Anybody who doesn't have a
ticket for this Saturday's bas-
ketball game between. Michi-
gan and Minnesota had better
find a scalper if he wants to be
in Crisler Arena for the show-
down. The last tickets were
sold yesterday for the Big Ten
game of the year.
in the final meeting of first place
contenders. Gopher starters Ron
Behagen and Corky -Taylor may
be in uniform, pending the out-
come of a district court decision
today.
The Wolverines play three of
their last five' games on enemy
courts plus the big one Saturday
against Minnesota.

-Daily-Robfe Tessem
MICHIGAN GUARD Wayne Grablec battles along the boards
with an unidentified Illinois player during the Wolverines' last
home game against the Illini. Standing under the basket with
apprehensive faces are Michigan's Steve Bazelon and Illinois'
Jim DeDecker. Michigan won the game convincingly 105-83,
and has since moved into second place in the Big Ten behind
Minnesota.
HERD STAMPEDES:

l-
e
e
o
f
h,
ie
a
t
e
t

This Week in Sports
FRIDAY
HOCKEY-at Notre Dame
WRESTLING-Big Ten Tournament at Indiana
GYMNASTICS-at Michigan State
SWIMMING-at Southern Methodist
TRACK-at Ohio State
SATURDAY
BASKETBALL-Minnesota at Crisler Arena, 2 p.m.
FRESHMAN BASKETBALL--CentralMichigan at-Crisler
Arena, 11:45 a.m.
HOCKEY-at Notre Dame
WRESTLING-Big Ten Tournament at Indiana
GYMNASTICS--Illinois at Crisler Arena, 4 p.m.

l

. 1 AG199fO.^ A riT1W. ': 'JS'.;.};.:.;. Y'L . S':Y

Ragin' Cajuns roll Qfl

Big Ten Standings
W L Pct
Minnesota 8 2 .800
MICHIGAN 7 2 .778
Ohio State .7 3 .700
Indiana 4 4 .500
Purdue ' 4 4 .500
Michigan State 4 5 .444
Illinois 3 5 .375
Wisconsin 3 5 .375
Iowa 3 7 .300
Northwestern 2 8 .200
Tonight's Games
Indiana at Illinois
Purdue at Wisconsin

t
I
3
t
}
i

By The Associated Press
LAFAYETTE, La. - I
Lamar scored 41 points an
Ebron added 36 to giveF
western Louisiana, the n
No. 10 major college bas
team, a 112-91 victory over
time -rival Northeast Louisia
Lamar, the nation's l
scorer with a 36.4 point pe
average, connected on 15
field goal attempts and ad
more from the free throw
He also led in assists
eight.
Ebron, ranked seventh
nation in -field goal perci
hit 17 of 28 from the fiel
two of four from the free
line.
Ebron also was thegame'
ing rebounder with 24.
Northeast was led by
Steele with 32 points.
Southwestern now is 21
the ~season while Northeast
8.
St. Francis sacrificedl
JOHNSTOWN, Pa. - A
starters. scored in double
as eighth - ranked Marsha
feated St. Francis 95-80 in
lege basketball game last n
Led by Russ Lee's 23 poin
'Thundering Herd made a
half comebackrby scoring
I- --
S41,0I E S
NBA
Baltimore 102, Philadelphia 101
ABA
New York 104, Dallas 95
COLLEGE
Kentucky 87, Georgia 63
Central Michigan 71, Wayne Stat
Slippery Rock 90, Grove City 59
Tennessee 55, Florida 52
Villanova 92, Boston College 70
Ferris 61, Lake Superior State 42
SW Louisiana 112, NE Louisiana
St. Louis 76, Texas 69
Marshall 95, St. Francis 80
Kan sas 71, Colorado 59
Davidson 85, Dayton 69
Vanderbilt 111, Alabama 51 6
W. Kentucky 103, Morehead 97,
overtime
Kansas St. 74, Oklahoma St. 52
Mississippi St. 62, Auburn 60
Grambling 92, Jackson, Miss. St.
Virginia 62, Clemson 60
NW Louisiana 92, McNeese 80

Dwight
id Roy
South-
ation's
ketball
rlong-
ana.
leading
r game
of 31
ded 11
line.
with

points in a row after St. Francis
held a 46-45 halftime lead. The.
margin of victory was their big-
gest lead of the night.
The victory was the 13th in
succession for Marshall,1which
now has a 22-2 record.
Tyrone Collins scored 18 points
for Marshall, Bill James and
Randy Noll poured in 14 each
and Mike D'Antoni added 11.
Wildcats ravage
MANHATTAN, Kan. - Kansas

State moved into a tie for first
place in the Big Eight conference
last night by blasting cellar-
dweller Oklahoma State 74-52.
The Wildcats, who are now even
with Missouri at 8-2, jumped out
to an early lead and coasted the
rest of the way.
K-State's man-to-man defense
held the Cowboys scoreless for 51/2
minutes at one stretch in the first
half. During that span, the Wild-
cats bolted from a 17-10 lead to
a 29-10 advantage.

S Thursday LUNCH-DISCUSSION Feb. 24--12 Noon
O "LATIN AMERICAN PEASANTS:
Modernization or Exploitation"
A CASE STUDY IN COLOMBIA
Speaker: MICHAEL TAUSSIG
Visiting Professor in Adthropology
Ecumenical Campus Center
921 Church Street
Cost: 50c Sponsored by the
Reservations: 662-5529 Ecumenical Campus Center

i

in the
entage,
d and
throw r
throw- Arlene Griffin .
s lead- (recent delegate to Paris Peace Conference)
Henry
Gene Plumiondon Marge Himmell
-2 for (visited N. Vietnam) (venceremos)
Sis 14-
ON,
II
ill iv"INDOCHINA:
.11 five
figures
all de-
a T HE NEW AIR WAR"
ts, the
second UNION BALLROOM-FRI., FEB. 25
g nine!
-- 8:00-Free Admission
SLIDES, MUSIC AND RAPS
-"I am not going to place any limitation upon the
use of air power in Indochina."-Nixon, Feb. '71
e 58
Come to Meet and Talk with
91
DR. SAMUEL KEEN
Visiting theolggian, philosopher and contributing
editor to PSYCHOLOGY TODAY
75 INFORMAL CONVERSATIONS-
- Wednesday evening, 8 p.m., at H ILLEL
"Reflections on Norman O. Brown and Martin
Buber: Mysticism and the Soul of the Child"

For the student body:
FLARES
by
Levi
Farah
Wright
Lee
Male
State Street at Liberty

.:.

.

I

1.

STUDENT SERVICES
POICY BOARD
open discussion on
Housing Service '72 Budget
TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 22
3:00 p.m.
Third Floor-Michigan, Union

*a

hi

L

I

.............. ...............m..mmmmmmmmmm =-m-m---m--. ..m.......... .m
Large 16"
U9
Cheese Pizza
DOMNO
for only.
1 I
* 1
r I
1 Ir
1 1.
I ~With this coupon
OeEach additional item 50c
Oecoupon per pizza Expires 2-25-72 iu
1 e
-CallDOMI NO'S
S-Call Nearest Location
I..1
I' I~rr r r lr r r r rr r r r r r w w r r r ~ r w w r r r r r r r wfr

U of M Students,
Faculty and Staff

Michigan Union
Barbers and Hairstylists
welcomes

BAHAMAS-
Freeport
SDAYS/4 NIGHTS-
MARCH 6 to 10
$129.00
o-
8 DAYS/1 NIGHTS
MARCH 5 to 12
$159.00
ALL TRIPS INCLUDE:
" Round trip non-stop jet
transportation
" Open bar and meal
service en route
9 Accommodations for

I

Right On' in the Residence Halls
REAPPLY FOR RESIDENCE HALL ACCOMMODATIONS
BETWEEN MARCH 14 AND MARCH 24, 1972

Thursday evening, 8:30 p.m., at
Pilot Program, Alice Lloyd Dorm

fiI

All students presently

residing in the residence halls

"Cleve"

must participate in the reapplication process. Materials
on the procedures relating to priorities and methods to

Washinaton

be utilized in selecting rooms for the

1972-1973 aca-

11

demic year will be made available to students before

1',

"' > NI

,I

.

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