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February 19, 1972 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1972-02-19

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page Six

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Saturday, February 19, 1972

Page Six THE MICHIGAN DAILY Saturday, February 19, 1972

Yarn Special
Sayelle-96c
(4 oz. skein)
"Lechic" and "Bouclette"
69c
NOW-SUNDAY
university Cellar
*also: POSTER SALE THIS WEEK

Cagers set to catch

Cats

6-8
6-5
6-10
6-3
6-6

MICHIGAN
Ernie Johnson
John Lockard
Ken Brady
Henry Wilmore
Wayne Grabiec

13.3
12.9
10.2
24.0
13.9

F
F
C
G
G

11.5
4.5
12,2
14.1
6.6

NORTHWESTERN
Rich Sund
Joe Otis
Barry Hentz
Mark Sibley
Paul Douglass

6-4
6-4
6-9
6-1
5-10

By SCOTT MARTEL down to defeat.
The Michigan Maplemen travel At 2-7, Northwestern is not the
across Lake Michigan to Evanston strongest team in the league. Yet
where the Northwestern Wildcats Michigan could be caught napping
will play host in the teams second tonight if they don't keep their
meeting of the season tonight. Iguard up. The Wildcats have de-
It is a must game for Michigan feated Michigan State and spoiled
if they intend to stay in the tight Purdue's first place bid by beating
Bi Tn titl rac The Wolverines them in Lafayette.

g 251gU1en, L .e rac . ,a yy.t.J
are currently 6-2 and they mustI
come home with another win if
they want a shot at first place.

The last time the two teams met,
the Wildcats gave Michigan a
tough time in the first half before
-in into the locker room on topn

Try Daily Classifieds

I

U

The squad looked impressive i4139 However the Wolverines
beatingtIinoi last wdeekr 10-9caught fire in the second half to
but in their last road performance I win 83-79.
they were something less than.
spectacular. Hampered by injuries,In that match-up, Henry Wilmore
the Wolverines allowed the Boiler- played one of the worst games of
makers of Purdue to muscle them his career, going most of the way
out of position 'as Michigan went at guard. Wilmore wound up with
just 15 points and six rebounds.
Most of the points came in the
second half when Wolverine Coach
Johnny Orr moved him back to
forward.
But Wilmore wasn't really miss-
ed as Ken Brady returned to last
year's form. Brady hooped for 13
points and cleared 13 caroms, but
it was his physical presence that
made the difference. With him
under the boards, Ernie Johnson
spend more time shooting
Th~ rpmonpriwit 22and 19

5CC

ELECi

Student Government Council (SGC) is the student government for the
vice-president, and eleven at-large members. The president, executive vice-
vice-president, and eleven at-large members. The president, executive vice-
president, five members-at-large for full-year terms and some members-
at-large for half-year terms are being elected this (winter) term.
SGC elections this term are MARCH 21, 22 (Tues., Wed.)
WHO MAY VOTE? All students (graduate students and undergraduates)
may vote.
WHO MAY RUN? Any regularly enrolled student on the Ann Arbor campus
of the U of M. This includes graduate and undergraduate students from all
schools and colle'ges.
HOW DOES ONE BECOME A CANDIDATE? Candidates must file a state-
ment of candidacy by February 29 (Tues.) and submit a $5.00 returnable
filing fee. Candidates must also submit a platform and 2 wallet-size photo-
graphs before a date determined by the Elections Director.
CAMPAIGNING is governed by the Election Rules. A candidate may spend
up to, but not over, $100 for a presidential slate, $60.00 for a position as
member-at-large.

± 1ity tt -'i ' VStu WLl ttGaA11 L
Ipoints respectively.

U of M* Students,
Faculty and Staff
BA HAMAS-
Freepori
5 DAYS/4 NIGHTS
MARCH 6 o10
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The Wildcats rarely get a spec-
tacular game out of any of their
players, and they don't do much
better as a team. They are aver-
aging only 67.4 points per game
and are shooting at a meager .403
clip.
The Wildcats' leading scorer is
playmaker guard Mark Sibley. The
6-1 junior is averaging 14.1 points
per game but only 6.0 rebounds.
Center Barry Hentz nets 12.2
points per game but only averages
8.1 rebounds, compared to league
leader Bill Franklin who is snag-
ging 16.5 for Purdue.
Rich Sund, switching off be-
tween forward and guard accord-
ing to the mood of Coach Brad
Snyder, has been hitting for 11.5
per contest.
MinneHIsota
appeals
suspensions
MINNEAPOLIS, Minn. (P) - Big
Ten Commissioner Wayne Duke
and former Minnesota football
coach Murray Warmath took the
witness stand yesterday in a fed-
eral court hearing into the suspen-
sion of two Minnesota basketball
players.
Attorneys for players C o r k y
Taylor and Ron Behagen sought a
temporary injunction against the
Big Ten's prohibiting the t w o
from playing for the Gophers. The
pair had been suspended for their
part in a brawl with Ohio State
Jan. 25 in Minneapolis.
The players maintained the Big
Ten has no authority to suspend
them and that their constitutional
rights to equal protection and due
process of law had been violated.
Federal judge Earl Larson said
he would announce Tuesday whe-
ther to grant a temporary in
junction against the Big Ten from
suspending Minnesota basketball
players Ron Behagen and Corky
Taylor.
For the Student Body:
SALE
" Jeans
* Bells
" Flares
Z off
CHECKMATE1
State Street at Liberty

Beyond these three, Northwest-
ern's lineup is as yet uncertain.
When Snyder wants extra height
under the boards, Sund is switched
back to guard and 6-4 sophomore
Joe Otis starts in the forecourt.
Otis made his first start of the
year in the victory against Purdue.
The other possible forward is
6-7 Greg Wells. Wells' stats are
less than spectacular as he has
only scored 2.7 points per game
and grabs only 2.9 rebounds.
If Snyder decides to go with the
better shooting lineup, Steve Berg
moves in to the forecourt. Berg
is averaging 9.6 points.
The Wolverines, in contrast are
leading the Big Ten in offense,
scoring 83.9 points per game. How-
ever, they are also well towards
the bottom in defense as they al-
low their opponents 79.9 per game.
In any case, the Wolverines have
to win a good portion fo their re-
maining six games, only two of
which are at home, if they hope
to keep up with the conference
leading Buckeyes of Ohio State
and the Gophers from Minnesota.

By THERESA SWEDO
Looking at today's gymnastic
meet against Indiana at 1:30, it
would seem as if brother acts are
becoming popular again at Cris-
ler Arena.
Two weeks ago against Minne-
sota, Ted Marti competed against
his brother Chuck, and this time
it's Jim Scully against his sib-
ling Roger. Besides inter-school
competition, Indiana has two
brothers of it's own competing on
th2 still rings. Both Scullys are
specialists on the high bar, an
event which today will follow the
meet's high point, the perform-
ances on the still rings.
The rings are Indiana's ace in
the hole. Their proficiency in this
event is not only noted by their
own coach, Jim Brown, who calls
his team one of the best still ring
teams around, but by rival coach-
es. Michigan's Newt Loken, admits
that the Hoosiers have "one of the
strongest ring teams in the na-
tion."
Indiana's superstar ringmen in-
clude two brothers originally
from Puerto Rico, Benny Fernan-
dez and his younger brother, Lan-
dy. Benny Fernandez is the lead-
ing scorer this year with a top
result of 9.55 and an average of
9.33.
He is being challenged by
James Malmedahl, who holds the
number two rings spot when in
top form.
The third man of the regular
team is freshman Landy Fernan-
dez, who averages around 8.93.
Between the three, they seem to
present a stiff challenge to any
ring team around. However, for
this meet, the Wolverines seem to
have a decided advantage.
Indiana's results from lastI
year's dual meets do not include
one score in the 160 range or
above. Michigan has been con-
sistently scoring 160 plus, with
excellent performances and espe-
cially fine scores coming in the
last three weeks.
Indiana has a record of 2-5 in
dual meets this season, but has

recently been plagued by injuries
to some of their top performers.
The men he has lost through in-
juries include senior Mike Taffe,
who competes in the floor exer-
cise and vaulting. Taffe has a
muscle injury to his left leg. He
averages in the low eights range
in free exercise and is Indiana's
top man in vaulting. His absence
will be disastrous in their scoring
potential.
Senior Tom Haller will also be
missing, sidelined with an intes-
tinal disorder. Haller is the Hoos-
ier's second man in vaulting with
an average score of 8.76, and he
also competes in free exercise as
Indiana's top scorer. Coach Brown
hopes to have him back for the
Big Ten contest on March 3rd
and 4th in Champaign, Illinois.
The third man on the sick list
for Indiana is Jim Malmedahl,
who has a nagging injury to his
left shoulder. He is a doubtful
performer in the rings, which
would leave the Fernandez broth-

ers to carry the load.
A fourth man who won't be
performing today is all around
man Ge~e Coyle, who was sus-
pended as a disciplinary action for
this meet only. Dave Carter will
take his place for at least three
events.
The Hoosier line-up for floor
exercise will be Gary Powell, Ken
Gosse, Dave Ward and Dave Car-
ter. Side horse competitors will be
Powell, Dave Ward and Dave
Carter. Side horse competitors
will be Powell, Dave Mattson and
Jack Harcourt. The still ring team
will consist of Dave Carter and
the Fernandez brothers, Benny
and Landy, with the possible ad-
dition of Malmedahl. In vaulting
the Hoosiers field Gosse, Powell,
Benny Fernandez, Ward and Car-
ter. The p-bars will be worked
by only three men, the two Fer-
nandezes sand Marti Meyers. On
the high bar are Dan Robin, Ben-
ny Fernandez, Carter and Roger
Scully.

-Associated Press
JIM CHONES OF MARQUETTE has signed to play for the New
York Nets of the ABA. Chones, a 6-foot-11 junior currently plays
center for the number two collegiate basketball power in the
nation. His decision was announced by the school's president on
Friday,

BROTHER ACT ON TAP:
Gymnasts face injured Indiana

4

4

'I

I

Tankers gear for OSU

PROSPECTIVE CANDIDATES can obtain further information and copies
the Statement of Candidacy, Election Rules, and the SGC Constitution
the SGC Offices, 3X Michigan Union or call 763-3241.

of
at

i

ELECTION SCHEDULE:

FEBRUARY 29 (Tues.) 5:00 p.m.
29 (Tues.) 7:30 p.m.
MARCH 1 (Wed.) 9:00 a.m.
MARCH 21, 22 (Tues., Wed.)

-Statements of candidacy must
be filed by this date and time
-Candidates meeting-
-Campaign begins
-Election dates

ALL TRIPS INCLUDE:
* Round trip non-stop jet
transportation
" Open bar and meal
service en route
" Accommodations for
four (4) or seven (7)
nights at the Freeport Inn
FOR DETAILS CALL:
Owen Perlman-663-2044
Larry Kaufman-764-7692
Steven Eder-763-2790
Carol Klau-663-8227
or
Steven Zacks-Studentours
483-4850

I

By GEORGE HASTINGS
When asked whether today's
swim meet with Ohio State was
the Wolverines' toughest yet out-
side of Indiana, Michigan s w i m
coach Gus Stager surprisingly re-
plied 'No!" "Actually," he said,
"This is our toughest meet of all,
including Indiana. Indiana, we
knew, was unbeatable. However,
Ohio State is beatable."
Stager's remarks reveals t h e
fact that the match with O h i o
State today is probably the dual
meet for which the Wolverines
have pointed for the most this
season. While Indiana is assured
of the Big Ten title, Ohio State
is the only obstacle to another
second-place finish for Michigan,
and it would be a psychological
advantge to the Buckeyes in head-
to-head competition.
Looking at prior stats for the
two clubs, the meet looks like a
fairly even affair, with perhaps
even a slight edge for Michigan.
The Wolverines have defeated
common opponents by a greater
margin than have the Bucks, par-
ticularly Southern Illinois, which
Michigan whipped 75-38, but which
lost to OSU by a mere three.
However, Stager feels that the
home pool, edge for the Buckeyes
today is a large plus factor which
could easily mean a win for Ohio
State. The .OSU pool, he explains,
is one of the oldest in the Big

Ten, and the Buckeyes' edge lies
in the fact that they are used to
the differences in the Ohio State
pool from most other pools.
But despite the effects the pool
may have on them, the Wolverine
swimmers still have an excellent
chance to take the match. The
main opposition will come from
three versatile Buckeye swim-
mers, Reed Slevin, George
Schmidt, and Bill Catt, along with
one of the finest diving c r e w s
around.
According to Stager, Slevin is
"far and away the Buckeyes' best
swimmer," but the question is in
which events the OSU star will
swim. Slevin is a fine backstroke,
butterfly, and medley man as well
as one, of the Big Ten's best short
freestylers. However, Stager feels
that wherever he swims, the Wol-
verines will have at least o n e
swimmer who can contend with
him.
The diving, however, is where
the Wolverines will definitely be
hurt. The Bucks have several fine
divers, including Rick Matheny,
Todd Smith, Tim Moor, and Steve
Skilken. In all probability Oh i o
State will go 1-2 in both dives. It
wil take an extra good perform-
ance by Michigan's Joe Crawford
to break up an OSU sweep here.
The Wolverines, on the other
hand, are counting on wins by their
aces, Stu Isaac in the breaststroke
and medley, Byron MacDonald in
the butterfly, and Steve McCarthy
in the 200 yard freestyle.

RALPH'S MARKET
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" Syrian, German, Italian, French,
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.

Take in the Mona Lisa at the Louvre
and the night life on the Left Bank.
But, why stay in Paris?
There's a France beyond Paris just
waiting for you to come visit.
Villages and towns steeped in art and
history. Vineyards, castles, Alpine spas
and beaches made famous by bikinis.
And the best way to get there
is by train.

cafeteria-style on the train.
French trains are known throughout
the world for their comfort, speed
and punctuality.
They're also known as a great place
to get to know the people. It's easy to
start a conversation in the relaxed
atmosphere of a train. Even if you've
barely passed second-year French, or
German or Spanish. For trains are

Railroad ticket office. For reservations:
French National Railroads, 610 Fifth
Avenue, New York 10020; 11 East
Adams Street, Chicago 60603; 9465
Wilshire Blvd., Beverly Hills 90212;
323 Geary St., San Francisco 94102.
74
Please send me your literature describing
places to see in France other than Paris.

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