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February 18, 1972 - Image 10

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The Michigan Daily, 1972-02-18

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Yi
Page Ten

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Friday, February 18, 1972

..age.Ten-THE MMMICIMHloiGAINI-IIIIIII III I I DILY Fr'dy,'Fbruay'18 1.-

U'-WIDE INCREASE:
Enrollment down on
Ann Arbor campus
By JOHN WEAVER that some out-of-state students
Reversing its recent pattern of may drop out this term and re-
steady growth, University enroll- enroll next fall as Li-state resi-
4lent on the Ann Arbor campus dents. The extent to which this
Pr the winter term has declined has occurred is uncertain, but some
bo 31,474 this year-a drop of 286 Iof the current drop can probably
from last year. be attributed to this new regu-
Total enrollment, including the lation.
Flint and Dearborn campuses and The level of student interest in
credit-extension students, was up particular fields has undoubtedly
Prom last winter's figure by 477. influenced growth, as evidenced
Z University officials point to the in increased enrollments in the
Cirrent economic situation, fluc- natural resources, nursing, phar-
buations in student interest in cer- macy, public health and business
din fields, and the increawed rate administration schools. Concern
q out-of-state tuition as factors with the current" unemployment
eausing the drop. situation in engineering education,
Such budgetary factory as fur- and graduate degree fields can also
tier cutbacks in state appropria- be seen in decreased enrollment
tions and a decline in graduate figures in those areas.
rellowship support and research Looking to the future, University
funds may also have a significant officials predict a "plateau" in the
effect on future University growth number of applications for the
patterns. next five to ten years, except for
, Out-of-state applications were areas of increased student inter-
down from last year by about 6 est, followed by a period of de-
er cent, in response to the eco- cline reflecting the diminishing
comic situation and out-of-state birth rate of the 1960's.
tuition rates, now $2140 for a two- National surveys also note en-,
term academic year, officials say. rollment increases in popular fields
A change in University residency with good employment opportuni-
requirements last December also ties, especially at less - expensive,
miade it possible for 18-year-olds public institutions, and stable or
to qualify for in-state tuition rates declining enrollment in fields with
[' they reside in Michigan for at decreased job opportunities, es-
least six months without attending pecially at private schools and col-
school - prompting speculation leges.

Black house approved

(Continued from Pagel1)
discussion revealed that such a
policy would allow a group of
"Grosse Pointe" students, for in-
stance, to establish separate hous-
ing if they wanted it.
Committee m e m b e r William
Dobbs spoke against the proposal
because of his beliefs that dorms
should allow students to mix, and
that it should only be the private
Lloyd-Couzens
annex defeated
(Continued from Page 1)
its Dec. 10 meeting. The plans
were to receive final approval in
a second reading yesterday.
Tom Lobe, Pilot Program direc-
tor, questioned the wisdom of
"spending money to save money"
at yesterday's meeting. He said
Lloyd students preferred to pay
higher prices and establish a food
co-operative in the dorm rather
than eat at the dining facility or
move elsewhere.
Feldkamp has suggested that
the money saved by the new fa-
cility be used to make building
improvements at Lloyd and meet
budget demands at Couzens. Couz-
ens' deficit budget could lead to
rate increases in the future, ac-
cording to Housing Office sources.
The question of "education vs.
dollars" was brought up frequently
at yesterday's meeting, as Pilot
Program psychologists contended
the proposed facility might be
"educationally damaging."

market which offers self-selection.
However, he voted in favor of the
unit.
Dobbs also said the Housing
Office should have attempted to
solve racial tensions before the
proposals were made by accom-
modating the housing system to
meet the "influx of blacks."
Stockwell's Nelson emphasized
that the unit would serve educa-
tional as well as social purposes.
She also stressed that the blacks
would not be segregated - that
blacks need to "get together" with
each other before they can com-
municate with whites.
Gill supported Kolars' substitute
motion because it served as a
policy statement for future refer-
ence. He said the original motion
was a "cop-out," presumably be-
cause it was so vague.
Philosophy Prof. Carl Cohen of
the Ann Arbor Civil Liberties
Board brought up concerns of his
own and other members of the
board. He claimed the unit would
"in fact" be segregated, although
it is open to whites.

Beer bash
at Bimbo's
The Tenants Union (TU) has
requested all Ann Arbor tenants
attend a free "political booze
bash" sponsored by city Republi-
cant at Bimbo's this afternoon.
The gathering, to which all local
newly registered voters have been
invited, will feature U.S. Rep. Mar-
vin Eschc, state Senator Gilbert
Bursley and state Rep. Ray Smit.
TU posters urge tenants to con-
front their legislators with hous-
ing problems here.
The informal party-to be host-
ed by Second Ward City Council
candidate Tom Burnham-will of-
fer free beer, pizza and peanuts.

II

For the student body:
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Lee
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Revised research plan recommended
(Continued from Page 1) posal are "the only way" the board b o d i e s such as Assembly and
Z The Regents are split on the will pass restrictions on research. SACUA would resign their posi-
Assembly proposal, with Regents Assembly members have not yet tions in protest of a rejection of
Robert Brown' (R - Kalamazoo). decided what action they will take the measure.
WVilliam -Cudlip (R-Detroit), Ger- if their policy is rejected. The plan is the second set of:
ald Dunn (D-Flushing), and Law- Economics Prof. Frederic Scher- research policies sent to the Re-
fence Lindemer (R- Stockbridge) er, a backer of the Assembly plan, gents by the assembly. The first,
gxpected to vote against the meas- said he was not sure what the approved by Assembly last fall,
are. next step would be. He indicated, provided that the University not
Regents Paul Brown (D-Petos 'however, that if the Regents re- engage in any federal classified
key), Getrude Heubner (R-B1om-jected the research plan Assembly research whichwould limit the
tield Hills), Robert Nederlander could conceivably vote in favor of publication of the results of the!j
D-Bfrmingham) and James Wa- faculty collective bargaining as a research.
Lers (D-Muskegon) appear to be ;protest .
leaingin avo ofthemeaure IAssembly's Committee on (fat-
' aning in favor of the measure. ulty)Rights and ResponsibilitiesH
trA source close to the adminis- has conducted a study on the feas-. H EAR
ration indicated last nmght that ibility of faculty collective bar- r
unn compromise plan maurese rc gainingeat the University. se Marvin Felheim
reunnitionsvote dingaortfhesneach committee concluded that usuchu
i~srcios rviigte ee-bargaining was not necessary at on
Mry five votes required for pas- this time, as it might cause undue VIOLENCE IN
sage of the proposals. I friction between administrators CONTEMPORARY
The possibility still exists that and faculty. LITERATURE
the Regents will postpone action However, some Assembly mem-
on the research issue until next , bers have indicated they will vote Sunday, 1 0:30 a.m.
month. in favor of collective bargaining 502 W. Huron
Several of the Regents have in- if the research proposal fails. ANN ARBOR
dicated bW r, thatmodifica- The possibility also exists that UNITARIAN FELLOWSHIP
tions in the original assembly pro- members of faculty representative

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