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February 18, 1972 - Image 9

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1972-02-18

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Friday, February 18, 1972

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Nine

Friday, February 18, 1972 THE MICHIGAN DAILY Page Nine

busted
Pardon brawlers? . .
... Unthinkable
al shackelford
FI E AFTERMATH of the celebrated Minnesota-Ohio State
brawl is getting more farcical all the time, with the Minne-
sota' athletic establishment along with black administrators
from Michigan State calling for the reinstatement of suspended
Gophers Ron Behagen and Corky Taylor.
Why either player should be allowed back on the floor 1
is beyond me, considering that these two and sub Dave Win- 1
field were guilty of the most deliberate violence in attack-
ing various Buckeyes. Even if Ohio State center Luke Witte's
elbows set the pot boiling, these players weren't justified in
setting off a racial battle ioyal which indiscriminately 1
drew in players from both sides and, worst of all, hot-
headed Minnesota fans.1
Let's briefly sketch out the prologue to the fracas: coming 1
off the floor at the half Witte clipped Gopher Bob Nix on the
head for no apparent reason, and no doubt Witte's character-
istic churning elbows and wicked pirouettes were in full play
during the entire game, shortening Gopher tempers. Still, Ken
Brady popped Witte with an elbow when Michigan played the
Bucks at Columbus and sent him sprawling, but nobody began
throwing punches. Big Luke just played on the emotions of the
partisan crowd with a pouting act and the game continued.
With seconds remaining in the Minnesota-OSU game, Tay-
lor fired the combat when he kneed Witte in the groin. The
ex-Detroiter first claimed that Witte had spit in his face,
then later weakly substituted a comment that he "thought"
Witte was going to spit at him. Taylor's wicked boot set off a
full-scale battle which saw Behagen stomping on the fallen
Witte, Winfield clobbering Mark Wagar at midcourt, and black
Gopher fans adding their feet and fists to Mark Minor on the
sidelines. Any white Buckeyes who happened to be standing
around were chased; Wardell Jackson and the other black
Buckeyes weren'tbothered.
The post-game rhetoric was almost as disgusting as the
violence itself. Ohio Governor John Gilligan, the successor
to former worthy James Rhodes and a typically big-
mouthed politician, called the affair a "public mugging,"
thus spicing the whole affair with a taste of premeditation.
Sports Illustrated took a few rabid shots at Gopher coach
Bill Musselman and sat "the talented seven-foot blond cen-
ter" Witte up on a pedestal, playing a short-sighted game
of heroes and villains. Ohio State coach Fred Taylor
steamed and, when his Bucks were whistled for 32 fouls in
their 88-78 loss to Michigan, claimed that the refs had been
afraid to ticket the Wolverines for fear of setting off an-
other battle.
And nowthe second outbreak of rhetoric has been initiated,
first by Minnesota's regents et al and lately by three black ad-
ministrators at Michigan State. Dr. Robert Green and his East
Lansing colleagues called for the hiring of black Big Ten of-
ficials and a consideration of the total question of the con-
ference's black athletes at its annual meeting in March. They
also joined with Minnesota's administrators in objecting to the
suspensions of Behagen and Taylor.
Of course black referees should call Big Ten games, and
instances of racism in the conference should be investigated
and punished. But to reinstate Behagen and Taylor is to con-
done deliberate violence and tell the world that assault is excus-
able when it occurs on the basketball floor.
Big Ten Commissioner Wayne Duke has already screwed
up the whole affair bad enough with his failure to suspend
Witte and Winfield, or even see that assault charges were
instituted against the violent players and any fighting fans that
might have been corraled. If Duke succumbs to the growing
pressure and reinstates the suspended Gophers, he will be doing
basketball a disservice.
4 .....gam mm ... ..~m .....g.... .
Professional League Standings
NBA Pacific Division

Pucksters

face

By FRANK LONGO
The moment of truth has finally
arrived.
The Michigan 'icers, horrendous
>n the road but sparkling at home,
will put their 8-2 Coliseum record
on the line tonight against the true
first-place team, Wisconsin.
'Early in the season, Michigan
defeated two other first - place
teams, Notre Dame and North Da-
kota, on home ice over successive
veekends.
But that was at a time when a
eam could lose a game and drop
'our places in the standings and
he league lead changed three
times in three weeks.
The Badgers, however, have
been atop the WCHA consistently
since the semester break, leading
by as many as 16 points.
Nevertheless, the statistics are
somewhat deceiving. Wisconsin
played three of their fourth eight-
point series by Jan. 2, which help-
ed stretch their lead. This explains
why their lead may diminish some
even if they sweep the weekend
series ,ere, in Ann Arbor.

"This is definitely a big series
for us," related Badger assistant
coach Bill Rothwell. "Our record
has fooled a lot of people. We
could lose ground no matter what
we do."
Michigan met Wisconsin back in
the first series of the season, and
many a fan will recall that fiasco
as a pair of drubbings, 8-1 and
7-2, but both games were tied go-
ing into the final period.
The Badgers "won't be taking
Michigan lightly by any stretch
of the imagination," says Roth-
well. "We know Michigan is es-
pecially tough at home."
Wisconsin will be at full strength
for the series, but the Wolverines
will be hurting slightly. Pete Dun-
bar isn't quite fully recovered
from what has at various times
been "analyzed" as a broken hand,
arm, or wrist. As it turns out,
Dunbar has been skating with a
protective cast for his broken
finger and should at least be able
to dress.
Forward Bob Falconer, who had
apparently been afflicted with a

Flaily
sport
NIGHT EDITOR:
CHUCK BLOOM
fractured ankle suffered la
end at Michigan Tech,
covered enough that he
able to play, but will not b
strength.
Meanwhile, the Wolveri
head into the final three m
of the season hoping to
on a 9-13 conference recor
sees them tied for seven
in the WCHA with Color
lege and Notre Dame. C
of the three will be all
compete in the post-seas
offs, however.
Minnesota, which Michig
in an eight-point series tw
Iene ait n almost lion

first-place
Perkins and Jim Makey, lead the
league with 2.4 and 3.1 goals
against per game, respectively.
Michigan's Karl Bagnell is 18th
out of 20 goaltexders with a 6.0
S goals against average, but is also
the league's hardest working net-
minder. Bagnell has made 865 V
saves so far this season in 22
league games, over 150 more than
his nearest competitor. Wisconsin
may' give him the chance to break :.
st week- the 1000 mark tonight.
has re- "We're coming on," comments
will be Wolverine coach Al Renfrew. "This
e at full will be the best test we've had so
far," he added.
nes will A formula? Somewhat pessimis-
veekends tic: "If we can get a couple goals
improve ahead," hopes Renfrew, "it'll be .,r..
rd which a great game." "

Badgers

th place
ado Col-
)nly two
owed to
on play-
an hosts
vo weeks
eless 12

WCHA Standings

This Weekend in Sports
, FRIDAY
WRESTLING-Wisconsin at Crisler Arena, 7:30 p.m.
HOCKEY-Wisconsin at the Coliseum, 8 p.m.
SATURDAY
BASKETBALL-at Northwestern
TRACK-at Michigan State
HOCKEY-Wisconsin at the Coliseum, 8 p.m.
GYMNASTICS-Indiana at Crisler Arena, 1:30 p.m.
TENNIS-Midwest Invitational Open, at Cleveland
SWIMMING--at Ohio State

101e, 1 1 11U4 1jGG"S1
points behind the three teams.
Although Wisconsin has held the
first place spot for several weeks,
they have only one player in the
top ten of the league in scoring.
Gary Winchester holds down the
tenth spot with 33 points. Mich-
igan's Bernie Gagnon leads the
league in goal-production with 21
and is in third position in scoring
with 38 points.
The biggest difference in the two
teams will be in the nets. The
Badgers' two goaltenders, Dick

Wisconsin
Denver
Minnesota-Duluth
North Dakota
Michigan State
Michigan Tech
MICHIGAN
Notre Dame
Colorado College
Minnesota

W
17
14
13
13
12
10
9
7
8
5

L
5
8
9
9
10
-10
13
13
14
17

Pts
42
36
36
34
32
28
22
22
22
10

This Weekend's Games
Colorado College at Minnesota
Minnesota-Duluth at Michigan
State (4 points)
Notre Dame at Denver (4
points)
Wisconsin at MICHIGAN
Michigan Tech at North Dakota

-Daily-Rolfe Tessem
BERNIE GAGNON, Michigan center and number one scorer in
the WCHA, stickhandles the puck in a recent contest against
Colorado College. Gagnon and the Wolverines face the league-
leading Wisconsin Badgers tonight at the Coliseum.

BRUINS BOMB FLYERS:
Pesky Penguins blank Buffalo

a a a7-7

J

By The Associated Press to's three goals-his 47th, 48th and
BUFFALO, N.Y. - Ron Schock 19th of the season-led the East
scored both goals as the Pitts- Division leading Boston Bruins to
burgh Penguins posted a 2-0 vic- a 4-1 victory over the Philadelphia
tory over the Buffalo Sabres last Flyers yesterday.
night in a National Hockey Lea- Esposito's first goal of the game
gue game.
at 8:28 of the second period proved
Theshutout wasthe first of to be the winning margin. The
the season for goalie Jim Ruth-
erford, who was observing his 23rd , wift' Bruins center coaxed the

)uck past Flyer goalie Doug Favell
from 10 feet out just as a hooking
penalty ran out on Philadelphia
forward "Guy Gendron.
Philadelphia got the lead on
Simon Nolet's 19th goal of the
season with 3:29 gone in the game.
But Bobby Orr brought Boston
3ven at 18:10 when he batted in

t4'e9ktahe wil 6e aheed .4
CALL COLLECT._
7 Days 24 Hours4
215-877-7700'.
&4'tnman4 93ee Clinic

birthday.

Schock's first goal came at the
8:12 mark of the first period as
le tippedkin a shot from the blue
line by Dave Burrows for his 10th
goal of the season.

f

Rutherford made some acrobatic
saves during scrambles around, the
Pittsburgh net as he blocked 23
shots to 26 for Crozier.
Flyers flounder
PHILADELPHIA - Phil Esposi-

Memphis St. 70, Bra
Army 76, Seton Hall
Rhode Island 77, Ver
Kentucky St. 100, U
Indiana, Pa. 86, St.'
Cathedral 70, Yeshiv
SE Louisiana 65, Lac

John McKenzie's rebound.
--ii * . .
IC ES 'Bulls knicked
CHICAGO-Dave De Busschere
climaxed an unbelievable come-
dley 59 back by scoring on a short jumper
72 with 25 seconds remaining in over-
rmont 61 time last night, enabling redhot
nion 67 New York to edge the Chicago
Vincent 83 Bulls 102-99 for the Knick's sixth
a 59 successive National Basketball As-
uisiana College 66 Sociation triumph.

MARCH

PHOTOGRAPHY WORKSHOP

'S.

5 Week Course Includes All Supplies

EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L Pet
Boston 44 20 .688
New York 39 23' .629
Philadelphia 24 38 .387
Buffalo 17 44 .279
.a Central Division
Baltimore 25 35 .417
Atlanta 24 38 .387
Cincinnati 18 43 .295
Cleveland 17 46 .270
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Midwest Division
Milwaukee 51 13 .796
Chicago 44 19 .698
Phoenix 39 25 .609
Detroit 22 40 .355

GB
4
-9
25f2
2
7%
9Y2
6J
12
28

Los Angeles
Golden State
Seattle
Houston
Portland

38
38
24
15

24
25
39
49

51 9

.850
.613
.603
.381
.234

14
141/z
28Y
38

Yesterday's Results
Milwaukee 117, Cincinnati 97
New York 102, Chicago 99, ot
Tonight's Games
Houston at Buffalo
Cincinnati at Cleveland
Chicago at Detroit
Atlanta at Baltimore
Philadelphia at Milwaukee
Boston at Phoenix
Portland at Los Angeles
Golden State at Seattle

a

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I

..... . . . . . .
. . .......
..........

WE HAVE the
SILLIEST THINGS
at
Campus Bike

BUYS.
COMPUTERIZED BOSE SPEAKER
DEMONSTRATIONS
FREE
Widely acclaimed by anyone
putting pen to paper, the
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again and again as a break-
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the contrary, there is no new
technology in the Bose 901,
but the true secret behind
its design is that it is the
first system to roll three
oldish ideas ... rear
radiation, multiple
speakers, and
equalization . .. intd
one. The sound? You'll
have to come and hear
'. the Bose 901's for
yourself to believe it'
We've prepared a series of
computerized demonstrations
for you that will explain
how these three basic ideas
make for a very revolutionary
speaker. Drop by on Friday,
Feb. 18th. Demonstrations
will be every hour-on the
hour starting at 12 Noon.
We will be open until 9 P.M.
this last day of OPEN
HOUSE WEEK

* PUSHING ASA
. COMPO$ITION
s FLOOD & STROBE LIGHTING
" DARKROOM USE AND INSTRUCTION
" FIELD TRIP
" MURALS
"SPOTTING PRINTS
March classes begin week of March 13.
Registration ends March 8, 1972.
Beginners $45-Advanced $55
Speciai 15 wk. Tutorial Course-$75
$20 Deposit Required with Registration

Ann Arbor
Photography enter
635 BROOKS 665-4772

11

I

TOYS
Silly Putty-Marbles-Yo-Yo's,
Yo-Yo Strings-Bubble Soap,
Nerf Balls-Kites-Water Guns

*

GAMES

HOBBIES

BICYCLES

Leg and Arm lites-Generator sets-
Locks of all kinds. Almost everything
for your bicycle needs
SCHWINN-RALEIGH-MERCIER Bicycles

$476 a pair

OPEN 10-9 THIS LAST DAY OF OPEN HOUSE WEEK

II

w - - - ~ - w~ -w 'w w 'V ~E U I.

r l

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