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February 16, 1972 - Image 9

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1972-02-16

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Wednesday, February 16 1972

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Nine

Papanek clan ignites coup;
Weirdbeard hits the road

I

*A black-clad rider galloped over the
lonesome prairie, past broken cow-skulls
and cacti, until he reached a buzzard-
speckled waterhole. He spat some tobacco
juice into the dust and regarded a pile of
carrion which was being worked over by
a gang of maggots.
The -old sports editors . ." he whis-
pered sadly,
But then, from far over the range,
came the sound of many riders. The soli-
tary cowpoke turned in the saddle , and
squinted into the distance, until he saw
eight white-clad hombres approaching.
"Must be the new sports editors," he
chuckled. Yes, it was:
EDITOR. John Papanek, a spaced-out
junior from Patchogue, New York, and
the "tight" end of the Daily Libels. On
learning of his prestigious appointment,
John remarked, "Aw, for Chrissakes, call
back when I get rid of this hangover!"
CXECUTIVE EDITOR Elliott Legow,
who hails from the friendly turf of Cleve-

land Heights, Ohio. Elliott possesses com-
puter-like Intelligence and, asked to rap
about his new post, laughed amiably and
whirred, "Brppp brppp scuzzz!"
ASSOCIATE EDITOR Bill Alterman,
who was driven from Silver Spring, Mary-
land after seducing a bhewed-up old slip-
per. His greatest claim to fame is his
single - handed defense of Frontierland
during the Apache siege on Disneyland.
ASSOCIATE EDITOR Al Shackelford,
Saginaw, Michigan's third most-celebrated
citizen, immediately after Stevie Wonder
and Kid Lavigne. He likes to listen to
King Curtis and sleep, and often com-
bines the two pursuits. He would like
readers to send him money c/o The Mich-
igan Daily, 420 Maynard.
ASSISTANT EDITOR Sandi Genis is
from New Britain, Connecticut and she's
a girl! All -her colleagues know Sandi
will go far here at the Daily, preferably
all the way.
ASSISTANT EDITOR Bob Andrews mi-

grated here from New York City and is
majoring in degeneracy, and doing quite
well. He would like to be a doctor some-
day, or at least play doctor with someone.
CONTRIBUTING EDITOR Randy Phil-
lips comes to us from North Miami Beach,
Florida and probably won't "contribute"
much, ha-ha. He keeps changing his ma-
jor so he won't have to graduate, but
someday the world will get a good lawyer.
And maybe Randy will make a good
grave-digger.
CONTRIBUTING EDITOR Mike Olin
is also from North Miami Beach (!!!) and
whiles away the lonely hours making his
own clothes and cooking, But don't think
Mike is a cupcake: he plays a pretty
rough game of whist!
"Wanted: young man single and free
experienced in love but will accept a
young trainee extra extra read all about
it playing cards and drinking in the bars
one monkey don't stop no show yah yah
yah," chanted the new staff in unison.

- Diy--''orn Gattnie
STRUNG ACROSS PEOPLE'S Plaza, which they helped liberate with their own blood, are the new Senior Sports editors out fot a
family outing. Promising better pages, more photographs and free lunche son Friday, the editors got together for this intimate shot
of scribe's at play. From left to right, the new hitting order is as follows: Bill "Froggie" Alterman, Al "Sweet Biscuit" Shackle-
ford, Sailin' Sandi Genis, Elliot "Iceman" Legow, Randy. "Deadeye" Phillips, John "Da Capo" Papanek,,.Bob "Big Apple" Andrews,
and Mike "Sacrifice" Olin.

i.

Purdue title hopes vanish

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By The Associated Press
LAFAYETTE - Wisconsin capi-
talized in a second half Purdue
drought to deal the Boilermakers
an 84-65 loss here last night, their
.*rst defeat in the 4-year history
of Mackey Arena.
Wisconsin outscored Purdue 33-
10 in the second half as the Boiler-
makers went slightly over six min-
utes without scoring a point.
From a 55-51 Purdue lead with
1 :24 to play, Wisconsin outgunned
t Boilermakers, 264, duripg the
next 11 minutes.
The score was tied 10 times and
changed hands 12 times before Wis-
consin surged ahead of Purdue in
the final period. Purdue held a
39-37 halftime margin. .
Seven-point losses to New Mexico
Site in the 1967-68 season and to
Michigan last year had been Pur-
due's poorest home performances
in the arena's history before last
night..
Purdue's second half shooting
from the field of 27 per cent gave
Big Ten Standings
W L Pct.
Ohio State 7 2 .778
Minnes6ta 7 2 .779
MICHIGAN 6 2 .750

daily
sports
NIGHT EDITOR:
FRANK LONGO
them 33 per cent for the game,
while Wisconsin had a 52 per cent
average from the field.
Kim Hughes led all scorers with
17 points for Wisconsin and four
other Badgers ;were in double
figures.
Purdue and Wisconsin are now
both 34 in the Big Ten and overall
Wisconsin is 10-7 and Purdue 9-8.
* * *
Hawke yes hit
IOWA CITY-Iowa reeled off nine
straight points early in overtime
yesterday to score an 87-84 over-
time Big Ten Conference basket-
ball victory over Illinois.
Iowa, 9-10, had a chance for a
victory in regulation time, but
Kevin Kunnert hit only one of two
free throws for a 76-76 tie with
nine seconds to play.
Rick Williams with 32 points, 20
in the second half and overtime,
led Iowa. The Hawkeyes shot 49.3
per cent from the field compared
to 44.1 for Illinois.
Illinois led through the entire
first half, once leading by nine
points, and held a 39-34 halftime
edge.
Iowa tied the game in the first
two minutes of the second half at

41-all and gained the lead for the
first time at 53-51 with 13:28 left.
The lead see-sawed from there un-
til the end of the game.
Iowa moved to 3-6 in the confer-
ence got 15 points from Neil Fegen-
bak, 14 from Gary Lusk and 12
from Jim Collins.
Jim Krelle had 25 to lead Illinois
and sophomore center Bill Morris
added 24. The Illini fell to 11-6
over-all and 2-5 in the Big Ten.
Wildcats whom p
MANHATTAN--Kansas State got
Kansas in deep foul trouble early
in the second .half, then pulled
away for a 7866 victory to move
FOR E S
Wittenberg 54, Heidelberg 52
Hiram 89, John Carroll 79
Wooster 73, Denison 63
Wichita St. 88, Chicago Loyola 64
Rhode Is. Coll. 124, Bridgewater St. 90
Auburn 91, Georgia Tech 77
Newberry 81, Wofford 67
Eastern Michigan 93, Oakland 88
Kenyon 80, Oberline 60
Holy Cross 84, Dartmouth 83
NE Louisian St. 106, Lamar Tech 103
Texas Tech 80, Rice 76
Texas 90, Baylor 70
Kansas St.78, Kansas 66
Massachusetts 112, Boston U. 9
Boston College 70, St. John's 66
Howard 84, Maryland-East Shore 81
Kentucky 101, Indiana 99

into second place in the Big Eight
basketball race last night.
Kansas frontliners Wilson Bar-
row, Randy Canfield and Neal
Mask all picked up their fourth
personals in the first seven min-
utes of the second half.
With the Jayhawk inside game
weakened, the Wildcats picked on
the weakness with success. Reserve
center David Hall came off the
bench to lead the charge inside
with 20 points.
Kansas' foul trouble also allowed
K-State to forge a 49-36 edge in
rebounding.
The Wildcats led 31-30 at the half,
but with the Jayhawk foul woes
K-State quickly moved into an
eight-point advantage, 51-43, and
put the game on ice 74-62 with
1:16 left.
Sharpshooting B u d Stallworth
paced the Jayhawks with 25 points.
The victory gave the Wildcats a
6-2 record, and 12-8 over-all. Kan-
sas dropped to 9-12 on the season
and 5-4 in the conference.
Loyola shocked
CHICAGO - Terry Benton and
Vince Smith combined for 46
points, including 31 in the final
half, to lead the Wichita State
Shockers to a convincing 88-64 in-
tersectional victory over Chicago
Loyola in the opener of a Chicago
Stadium college basketball dou-
bleheader last night

This Week in Sports
FRIDAY
WRESTLING-Wisconsin at Crisler Arena, 7:30 p.m.
HOCKEY--Wisconsin at the Coliseum, 8 p.m.
SATURDAY
BASKETBALL-at Northwestern

I

'I

We have the BESTF
REPAIRS and SERVICE
around-TRY US
SPORTS CAR SERVICE
OF ANN ARBOR, ;I.
4705 Washtenaw
(next to Ypsi-Ann drive in)

1

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IwNw-rv

F,

T-W-F- -8-; M and Th 8-9

TRACK-at Michigan State

.r

Mchican State 4 4
urdue 3 4
Indiana 3 4
Wisconsin 3 4
Iowa 3 6
Illinois 2 5
Northwestern 2 7
Yesterday's Results
owa 37, Illindis, 84, ot.
isconsin 84 ,Purdue 65

.500
.429
.429
.429
.333
.286
.222

IProfessional League Standings

NBA
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L Pct
Boston 43 19 .894
New York 37 23 .617
Philadelphia 23 38 .377
Buffalo 17 44 .279
Central Division
Baltimore 25 34 .424
Atlanta 23 38 .378
Cicinnati 18 41 .305
veland 17 45 .274
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Midwest Division

I

Milwaukee
Chicago
Phoenix
Detroit

50 13
34 18
38 25
22 40
Pacific Division

.794
.710
.603
.355

Los Angeles 50 8
E den State 38 24.
S. ttle 37 25
Houston 24 38
Portland 15 48.
Yesterday's Games
Baltimore 113, Houston 98
Atlanta 113, Detroit 105
Golden State 103, Buffalo 100
Cincinnati at Los Angeles, Inc.
Boston at Portland, inc.
Today's Games
tuston at New York
Cleveland at Philadelphia
Baltimore at Atlanta
Los Angeles at Phoenix
Boston at Seattle
ABA
East Division
W L
Netucky 47 12.
inia 37 25
New York 28 32
Floridians 23 37.

.862
.613
.597
.387
.238
Pet
.797
.597
.467
.383

19%
25%
3
6%
9
5-
12
27%
14
15
28
37%
GB
11%
19
24

Carolina 24 37
Pittsburgh 21 38
West Division
Utah 41 20
Indiana 35 26
Dallas 30 34
Denver 24 36
Memphis 23 36
Yesterday's Games
Dallas 115, Virginia 111
Carolina 126, Pittsburgh 113
Kentucky 101, Indiana 99
Floridians at Denver, inc.
Utah at Memphis, inc.
Today's Games
Utah at New York

.393
.357
.672
.574
.469
.400
.390

6
12%
16
16Y2

S
Vi i{t 1
I l
t
t
1
1
7
i1
r
fi
}
I,
i. i

Boston
New York
Montreal
Detroit
Toronto
Buffalo
Vancouver
Chicago
Minnesota
California
St. Louis

NHL
East Division
WL T
40 8 9
35 11 9
31 13 11
24 23 9
23 24 11
11 32 14
15 34 5
West Division
38 13 6
30 18 9
18 29 11
19 31 8

Pts
89
79
73
51
57
36
35
82
65
47
46

26
26

Pittsburgh at Kentucky

GF GA
234 126
238 127
211 147
181 176
182 179
151 214
136 192
190 115
153 128
158 216
158 191
135 1M
139 185
145 228

ENGINEERS, WE'RE HIRING!
Consider these facts about TI's Equipment
Group when looking for a career.
DIVERSIFICATION-We are industry lead-
ers in many fields. Your career can take
shape in Radar-- Electro Optics - Guid-
ance Control - Communication - Com-
puter Design and others areas. The choice
is yours.
STATE OF THE ART TECHNOLOGY-Stay
current by working in systems develop-
ment that is in the fore-front of Electro
Mechanical Design or fabrication. This is
the key to your long range success and
security.
JOB STABILITY-Yes, because we have set
a new growth goal-to reach $3 billion in
annual sales in the decade of the Seven-
ties. This growth will provide endless ad-
vancement opportunities for engineers
who have a desire for responsibility in an
innovative, enthusiastic growth corpora-
tion where the atmosphere is informal
but highly competitive, demanding and
professional. See us at your Placement
Office. We will be on your campus inter-
viewing
February 15 & 16
Evaluate yourself the potential of a career
with TI. If the schedule is full or you cannot
interview on campus, send a resume to:
R. Y. HENSLEE
CORPORATE STAFFING
TEXAS INSTRUMENTS INCORPORATED
P. 0. BOX 5474, MS/67
DALLAS TEXAS 75222

Philadelphia 17 29 10 44
Pittsburgh 16 31 9 41
Los Angeles 15 37 7 37
Yesterday's Games
Boston 6, California 3
Chicago 3, St. Louis 1
New York at Vancouver, inc.
Today's Games
California at Montreal
Toronto at Pittsburgh
Detroit at Minnesota
Philadelphia at Chicago
St. Louis at Los Angeles

U'

CITY-WIDE MEETING
Human Rights Party
TONIGHT ~TONIGHT

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