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February 16, 1972 - Image 8

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1972-02-16

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Page Eight

THE MICHIGAN DAI0

Wednesday, FebrLiary 16, 1972

THE MICHIGAN DAIL'r Wednesday, February 16, 1972

. . t

PRE SCRIPTION EYEWARE
and SHADES

ORb1
By DAN BORUS
Sports are becoming the Number
One interest of people in America.
For us to be relevant, we had to gain
the. attention of millions of people
In a way they understand, and they
would tune us in on TV to hear us
preach the gospel.-IUr. Oral Roberts.
In the thirties, Oklahoma was}
a barren place, at the mercy of
the dust and the great winds.
They were poor farmers, who had
a belief in a primal, powerful
God who controlled their destiny,
as translated by a preacher who
knew His word.
Oral Roberts was one such
preacher, a man who collapsed on
a basketball court from the ef-
fects of tuberculous when he was
fifteen years old, and whom God
"healed through prayer," Roberts
dropped out of college at the age
of 29 to repeat the acts of Jesus,
stringing out through the South-
west healing people in tents and
run down shacks.

Victories for God?

But the Depression is gone. Now
it is largely stories of F.D.R., W.
P.A., and a host of other initials.
Oklahoma is part of the twen-
tieth century; Tulsa is a bustling
city, fashioned by the advent of
American industrialism.
Oral Roberts, who brought this

triumphed in New York, the jub- year from Cassidy, Kansas. With

liant Roberts told the Times,
"This was a victory for God, not
basketball." In fact there is a sort
of Divine presence that follows
the Titans wherever the 19-1
team plays, as if He were work-
ing Miracles on the pick and roll.

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fundamental earthy response to Oral Roberts University plays
Americans via the airwaves, has ball in the same manner that Dr.
changed with the times. Dr. Rob- Oral Roberts and his preaching
erts is president of his own Uni- contemporaries used to prostel-
versity and is now part of the tyze the Gospel. Rag (Run and
pitch the Tulsa Chamber of Com- Gun), Coach Trickey calls his of-
merce gives to any seeker of in- fense and it has all the fury of a
formation. fundamentalist meeting. The Ti-
tans lead the major colleges in
Seven years ago in Tulsa, Rob- scoring and in rebounding with
erts put together an institution of averages of 104.7 and 59.7 respe-
higher learning, one where he tivelya
would instruct young men and y
women in the way of the gospel Eddie Woods, a 6'7" postman
and Jesus' love, barring drinking, from Chattanooga, rips the board,
smoking and dancing. off its hinges, garners the ball
and throws the sacrament to Ri-
Today, Oral has his messengers chard Fuqua, the nations sec-
on the maplewood. When they ond leading scorer or Eldon Law-

662 5903

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the ball, which is a gift of God
in Fuqua's able hand, ORU has
performed many miracles on the
hardwood.
There is a catch, a theological
drawback, if you will. ORU is de-
fenseless. The Titans have been
penetrated for 90.9 points a game,
a statistic that ranks the team
209 out of 210 in the nation.
The coaching staff defends the
type of running play thusly, "Be-
cause we shoot a lot (at least one
hundred to one twenty shots a
game), the other team gets a
chance to shoot a lot as well."
In their first year in major
college competition, they are well
on their way to achieving their
president's goal of becoming "na-
tionally competitive" and bring-
ing more people to Christ.
But ORU wants to stay up there
among the kings of the hardwood.
And good ballplayers are not
made by faith alone.
Recruiting is done in part
through the ministry and as coach
Trickey put it, "followers of the
president." Players are not home
grown seeds and stems, but blue
chip prospects from all over the
nation. Inghram "slim" Mont-
gomery came from Brooklyn and
his 6' 6" frame has provided much
of the rebounding and scoring.
A quick glance through the
ORU pressbook reveals that the
parents of the recruited players
are 11 devoted Christians, pre-
dominately Baptist lower-working
class souls.
Surprisingly the all-white color
that Roberts or his followers
sometimes project is absent from
the basketball team. Fundamen-
talism and basketball comes in a
black shade for ORU, such as
four starters worth.
Already the Titans have picked
off another plum, ready to work
in His service and on the hard-
wood floors of Tulsa. David
Vaughn, a 6' 11" High School All-
American, who may make their
Maple Messiahs competition , for
the college championship.
But an immediate goal is either
a berth at 'large in the NCAA
tourney or, as is more likely, an
NIT invitation. There are a lot of
souls for Christ in New York and
a lot of souls who watch cham-
pionships on television.
Roberts himself argues that.
winning is most important. "It's
all right to lose some, but I'm not
much for losing. We're geared up
for winning here."
Roberts has reversed a classic
formula: In Indiana, legend has
it, basketball is god. In Tulsa,
God is basketball.

Splish, splash
BUSINESS ON THIS New York City street was brought to a halt
so that it could be flooded for the first annual Daily Libel's swim
meet. A friendly usher, seen here in his fireman's disguise, helps
a young fan find her front row box seat before the swimming
began. The event, normally held the week of spring break was
moved up three weeks due to unseasonably swarm wiather in Fun
City. AO
SCHRANZ IRATE:
Austrian "hero" quits

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VIENNA (P) - Skiing idol Karl
Schranz r e t i r e d yesterday just
one week after Austria celebrated
him as a national hero out of sym-
pathy for his disqualification from
the Olympic Games on charges of
professionalism.
In a letter to Karl-Heinz Klee,
president of the Austrian Ski Fed-
eration, Schrantz, at 33 one of the
oldest and most successful skiers
ever in the history of the sport,
said he retired because of unfair
treatment and promises broken by
international sports officials.
Schrantz said his decision to
leave the international skiing cir-
cuit ultimately was prompted by
failure of the International S k i
Federation (FIS) to stage separate
world championships despite prev-
ious assurances.
The skier, whose glittering, 17-
season career was interspersed
with defeats and disappointments,
was one of the most press-minded
athletes of international repute.
Ironically, it was that willingness
to meet newsmen that may have
been instrumental. in his disquali-
fication at the Sapporo Games.
At the time Schranz case was
receiving an international airing,
FIS officials ; indicated they would
go ahead with their own world
championships if any skiers were
barred from Olympic competition.
That, however, never came.
about, and apparently disturbed
Schranz.

"What tipped the scales," Schranz
wrote in his retirement letter,
"was that FIS broke its word by
not holding world championships.
In addition to the great strains
that go along with competitive
sports, the assaults from all sides*
launched against myself are too
much to cope with."
Schranz said he would not take
part in the upcoming World Cup
races and had no current plans
to turn, professional. He did not
rule that out for the -future, how-
ever.

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For the Student Body:
LEVI'S
Corduroy
Bells

Dear Howard?
Attention: all yotf frustrated
journalists out there. Would
you like the. world to lupow:your
formula for - peace between
Avery Brundage and the Aus-
trian embassy? Do you have an
opinion on the red-shirting of
cheerleaders at Ohio. State.
Would you like to see ,your
erudite, pithy comments gracing
the Daily sports pages?
Mail those aforementioned
comments to Ffats Strops, c/o
Sports Editor, 420 Maynard. Re-
member, even Howard "t h e
Great" had to start, somewherq.
Read FFATS ST(OlPS MAIL-
BAG, beginning next week on
the sports page.

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$8.50

COUNCIL FOR EXCEPTIONAL CHILDREN
CEC Meeting TODAY*
FEBRUARY 16-ROOM 2310
EDUCATION SCHOOL
New membership drive. We'll be discussing
stote and national conventions.

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Look "xnii
who's inthe
travel busiess.

CHECKMAT E
Stt Street at L)bert

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EVERYONE IS WELCOME

c
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Yes, we are in the travel
business, and our
Travel Services Department
is located at 119 E.Liberty
Street. Its purpose is to bring
still another service to our
reguiar customers-and to
residents of the Greater Ann
Arbor area.
The range of travel services'
offered isbroad and includes
both domestic and overseas
travel accommodations.
THE SERVICES YOU
EXPECT ARE THE
SERVICES YOU GET
FULL SERVICE
Short Trips
Overnight or weekend
excurtions including:
bvsihnesstrips, theatre trips
and sporting events.
Extended tours. throughout
tbe United States or to
foreign countries.
GiftTrips
Perfect for Holidays,
=t:.lav.. W m:l - n a ann

CONVENIENCE.
You can phone from home
(761-1300), or stop in to see
our manager, Bob Miller,
personally. For your added
convenience we are placing
direct phones to the Travel
Services Department in
the lobby of each Huron Valley
National Bank office.
SECURITY
By planning your trip through
us you are assured of getting
the service you want-with
no worry of whether or not the
agency will be able to fulfill
its obligation.
ECONOMY
By keeping up-to-date on the
economies of travel, we can
make the best possible arrange-
ments-and will help you take
advantage of special rates
frequently offered by carriers.
PROFESSIONALISM
A trained staff offering many
years of experience. Member-
ships: American Society of
Travel Agents (ASTA);
Association of Bank Travel

WHFTHER FOR
BU ANESS OR
PLEASURE,--
The travel services you
need can be found at.
119 E. Liberty.
So, stop in, or phone us at
761-1300 soon, won't you?
Whether you're planning a short
trip, a long trip, a gift trip-or
just want to inquire, Bob
Miller and his staff will enjoy
chatting with you.
Natioal Bank
U1W hENT
;F

Man Adapting to the Small Planet
SEMINAR SERIES
DR. JOHN TODD
Director of the New Alchemy Institute
DESIGN OF ENVIRONMENTALLY
ADAPTING COMMUNITIES
WEDNESDAY, FEB. 16, 7:30 P.M.
UGLI MULTIPURPOSE ROOM
sponsored by ECOLOGY CENTER & COMMUNITY ORGANIC GARDEN

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MEET BOB MILLER
He Works Full Time for HVNB
.to Serve You
Bob Miller, manager of our
Travel Services Department,
brings to Ann Arbor a thorough
working knowedge of
domestic and international
reservation nprocedu res; ticket-
ing, international tariffs, and
customer service.
Bob's background includes
seventeen years experience
in the travel industry, including
hoth airline and travel aaencv

MUSEUM .7
AN UNUSUAL SERIES
OF NEW FILMS ON
ART PRODUCED BY
LLA L UNIVERSAL STUDIOS
The Art Conservator-Kinetic Art in Paris-The Impressionists
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 17

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