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February 12, 1972 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1972-02-12

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Page Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Saturday, February 12,197Z

Page Two THE MICHIGAN DAILY Saturday, February 12, 1972

TV
Mvovie Agenda
TONIGHT
ABC-The Hound of the Bask-
ervilles
TOMORROW
OBS-Ben-Hur, Part 1
ABC-Cleopatra, Part 1
MONDAY
ABC-Cleopatra, Part 2
NBC-Operation Kid Brother
CBS-A Patch of Blue
TUESDAY
ABC-Call Her Mom
CBS-The Anniversary
WEDNESDAY
CBS-Twilight of Honor
THURSDAY
CBS-My Blood Runs Cold
CBS-The Glass Bottom Boat

Vsions of Spain

By DONALD SOSIN
Watching Alicia De Larrocha
play the piano in last night's
program presented by the Uni-
versity Musical Society, I was
struck by the concert's resemb-
lance to a bullfight. This hap-
pened midway through the third
book of Iberia by Albeniz; the
combination of Spanish artist
playing Spanish music, in a
flashy red dress, confronting an
ominous black piano before
thousands of spectators seemed
to suggest cries of "Ole" and vis-
ions of roses being tossed upon
the stage. There were none, of
course, but there were plenty of
Bravos, and a "coup de grace"
in the form of a delightful en-
core.
The middle two books of Iber-
ia that we heard present enor-
mous problems to the pianist.
Albeniz' coloristic chords can
sound like so much mud in the
wrong hands. The rhythms and
intricate crossing of lines de-
mand absolute control over each
nd note while giving the impression
he that all is flowing and sponta-
Oit neous. That is a great credit to
5, e Larrocha. Her playing con-
tained amazing subtlety, and
L' there was much to learn from
in her ability to give clarity to
the thickest textures of the flor-
id, impressionistic sections. The
individual movements that stand
out are "Almeria," for its sheer
delicacy and sinuous rhythm;
the flowery "Triana," and "La-
au- vapies," the closing piece, next
ics to impossible, yet perfectly clear
and in its conception and execution.
an De Larrocha's tone is a joy.
ter No wonder she dislikes record-
hic ing: in an informal discussion at
it the School of Music Thursday
nay she spoke with distaste of en-
ike gineers who cry, "More bass!"
ece and turn up the knob. There is
lds nothing to alter in her playing.
te- She can get a big sound without
ter ever becoming percussive, and
works miracles as she brings out
st" lines that one never knew ex-
has isted.

This held true in the first
part of the program, which con-
sisted of two Scarlatti sonatas,
and Schumann's Kreisleriana.
The second of the Scarlatti
works seemed to rush at times,
but never lacked in clarity.
Schumann's lengthy Op. 16 is
not for the casual listener. As
with Albeniz, harmonic ideas
and characteristic devices can
begin to run together and be-
come uninteresting-careful list-
ening is mandatory. This as-
sumes that the performance will
be first-rate. And that it was.
There was no lack of food for

thought as DeLarrocha evoked
tenderness, alternating with the
fierce surges of Schumann's
music. And when a section re-
turned after the movement was
seemingly over, it became all the
more poignant in her hands; as
though a quiet reflection on
something long since gone.
De Larrocha set herself a large
task in programming Kreisler-
iana and Ibera, but it was one
that she proved totally capable
of handling, and if there was a
bullfight in Hill Auditorium last
night, the bull was not so much
conquered as tamed.

Modupeola Alade
Modupeola Alade, television
producer and master of cere-
monies on the Nigerian Broad-
casting Corporation (NBC-TV),
will arrive at the University
campus tomorrow for a three-
day visit.
His tour of the United States
is sponsored by the International
Visitors Program of the U.S
State Department's Bureau of
Educational and Cultural Af-
fairs, with programming by the
African-American Institute.
Alade will meet with a discus-
sion group at an African dinner
tomorrow evening at the United
Methodist Church, where he will
discuss the role of the Christian
Church in the African revolu-
tion.
On Tuesday he will be fea-
tured at a jazz and rap session
during an Ecumenical Campus
Association luncheon at the
International Center.
Persons wishing to talk to
Alade during his Ann Arbor visit
should contact William S. La-
Vine at the International
Center's 'Foreign Visitor Office
(764-2148).

THE
MARX
BROTHER 'S
will appear in a special
film benefit at Cinema
Guild on MONDAY at 7
& 9 p.m. in ARCHITEC-
TURE AUDITORIUM for
75c in the film ANIMAL
CRACKERS for
pirgim

*.

Mickey Mouse joins Donald Duck, Goofy, Sleeping Beauty, ar
legions of Walt Disney's other well-loved characters in ti
musical extravaganza "Disney on Parade" which opens in Detr
Tuesday at the Olympia Stadium. Tickets are priced at $6, $
and $5 and can be purchased at the Olympia and all major J.]
Hudson and Sears stores.

Iili

Ilr

Golden chords slowly realized

By DAVID and LINDA SIGLIN
David Bromberg, who has just
released his first solo album
David B r o m b e r g, Columbia
(C31104; has become a very fa-
miliar figure to Ann Arbor audi-
°-ences over the past. year. His
previous back-up work on albums
by Jeff Walker, Paul Siebel, and
Bob Dylan, to name a few, has
:made his guitar style easily rec-
ognizable. Suffice it to say if
-you've heard his voice once, you
=don'tforget it. He has appeared
-at Hill Auditorium and played
the Ark four times, once as Bob
"Wbite's lead guitarist. Even
.when his plane was late and he
lhad to rush on stage at 10:00,
,." or when he was deathly ill and
,his golden voice was turning to
flax before our very eyes, he
never failed to stun his 'audience
With his high energy and his
1brilliat guitar.
Jim Kweskin will appear at
the Ark on Feb. 14, due to
scheduling difficulties, and not
on Feb. 21.
I "don't think there is a musi-
n in the business today who
doesn't wish David Bromberg the
best possible luck and success.
'Ils ultimate humility and eag-
erness to hear other people's
music has made him a legend
from the very traditional musi-
clans to the most modern. So
here comes his record, and
everybody knows exactly what's
going -to be on.it and just what
it's going to sound like.
And we're all wrong. I put the
record . on and sit back only to
hear David Bromberg run on the
stage at World Control Studios
and start this uptempo riff, and
it -turns out to bekthe wrong
song; the band breaks down and
-Bromberg makes a crack about
wouldn't it besgreat if it had
been the right one. I sit up. Then
it cuts into the first real song
and the second, and I think the
balance must be off on my set,
etc., etc. After hearing the whole
record I wonder if maybe Brom-
At State and Liberty
Progfotm Iformation 662-6264
HELD OVER-
4TH WEEK!
Open 1 p.m. dily
Shows at 1:15-3:10-
5 p.m.-7 p.m.-9 p.m.
Feature 5 minutes later -
"IT'S A
SIZZLER!"
-Barnard, Detroit News
"ONE OF THE
YEAR'S TEN BEST"
-Time
"Come on like gang-bust-
ers and never let up .. .
in a running battle of
technological one - ups-
manship , .. I doubt if
you'll see anything quite
as devastating."
-Michigan Daily

berg went crazy or senile or
decided to chuck his career, so
I listen to it again. And again,
and again. It sounds better every-
time; I begin to tune into what
he is trying to do.
There is no clear hit single.
There is enough fast, clean gui-
tar work to impress the most
hardened mind; note especially
the duet with Norman Blake on
"The Boggy Road to Milledge-
ville."
There is one song that, no mat-
ter how many times I hear it,
I will disagree with its inclu-
sion. "Pine Tree Woman" is too
harsh, too grating,* the lyrics
don't justify it lasting five min-
utes, the bass is too loud, and
several times David's strings go
out of tune. There are several
songs that appear weak on the
first hearing. But if you get rid
of the preconceived notion that
Bromberg at his best is a clean
sound, "Suffer to Sing the Blues"
and the "Holdup" become great
funk at its campiest. The sax is
so humorously unexpected at
times that it is reminiscent of
Commander Cody's Andy Stein.
The backup men on this album
are exceptional. Steve Burgh on
bass is always solid. Vissar
Clements' fiddle playing on'
"Lovesick Blues No. 3" is superb,
and Will Scarlett's harp on
"Delia" helps change it from
a beautiful song to an unforget-
tably haunting experience. Da-
vid's guitar work on "Delia"
and "Mississippi Blues" is sod
clean and tasteful, his technique
so effortless that the songs are
communicated on a primary le-
vel. And that is the essence of
art.
But the strongest songs on the
album are the first and the last:
"Last Song to Shelby Jean" and
"Sammy's Song." These are
Bromberg the songwriter at:his
peak of maturity. "Last Song to

Shelby Jean" is simply a be
tiful piece of music. The lyr
are direct and unpretentious a
the vocal, and guitar about
adolescent's sexual encoun
with a prostitute. The grap
quality of its narrative makes
a song that many listeners mn
find offensive. You'll either l
the song or you won't. The pi(
itself is very well written, ho
together perfectly, and comple
ly gets across what the wri
intended.
This is one of the best "fir
albums I've ever heard. It l
wide variety, great guitar pI
ing, some of the best bac
in the business, is vocally expr
sive, and it never gets bland
boring. Most important, it gr
in interest every time you h
it.
Editor's Note: D a v i d aj
Linda Siglin are managers
the Ark, local coffeehouse.

Want to stablish Jstice
7 Seats Open for Central Student Judiciary
All Campus Supreme Court
Interviews: Sign-up at 3-L Michigan
Union or call 764-9899
PETITIONING ENDS FEBRUARY 15

4

4

-Daily-Robert Wargo

Alicia de Larrocha

[u

ay-
kup
res-
or
ows
ear
nd
of

Rent your
Roommate with
a Classified Ad

this KPKMD
S$1.50 8%$0

Q:

What will

0u A
pirgim do After
the Petit ion Drive?,

FIND OUT YOURSELF
WHY EVERYONE'S TALKING ABOUT-

A. TWO TH INGS-

A DIFFERENT KIND OF COVE STORY
NO ONE UNDER 18 ADMITTED
UM SAT. & SUN.
LIBERTY5.3 - - :0 10
ARBOR 5:30-7-8:30-10
'"" Weekdays 7-8:30-10

MacARTHUR
MARGARET
w dulcimer
Ballads &
songs from
the United
States
NEXT WEEK-
Mike Seeger

O O PFPTH P1O
FIFTH AVENU AT
DOWNTOWN ANN
INFORMIATION 761'

1. There will be an SGC election (recently changed to) March 21. At the
same time, students will vote "yes" or "no" on whether to have PIRGIM. At
the same time, students will elect PIRGIM directors for the state student
board, which will hire staff over the summer and. allocate project monies.
2. There will be projects for PIRGIM volunteers-to work on. Right now
PIRGIM people-petitioners,.office staff, team captains, are suggesting pro-
jects for PIRGIM energies,
Want some action in the areas of environmental quality, racial and sexual
discriminatiorn, consumer offairs, community housing and health care, and
the functioning of public and private institutions?
Call pirgim at 763-2176 with your ideas, or come

I

STUDENT SERVICES
POLICY BOARD
open discussion on

1451 _ Hill $MET
Z 1 [SE

to the office, Room

112 Law Library

I

TV & Stereo Rentals
$10.00 per month
1O DEPOSIT
FREE DELIVERY, PICK UP
AND SERVICE
CALL:
NEJAC TV RENTALS
662-5671

1

ACTION FOR A CHANGE

S
A'

Counseling Services

'72 Budget

I

m

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY

15

the ann arbor filn o-operative
SPECIAL RETURN ENGAGEMENT FOR VALENTINE'S DAY!

-I

4:00
Third Floor-Michigan Union

"All you need is Love, Love. Love is all you need .. .

SHOWS AT
1:15-3:45-6:15-8:50

DIAL 5-6290
FEATURE AT
1 :30-4:00-6:30-7:00

Animated Beatles in George Dunning's
YELLOW

I

su

ARINE

All they wanted was their chance to be men ...
and he gave it to them!

Design by Heinz Edelman. ELEVEN SONGS!

I

"Yellow Submarine gave me a new cinematic experience . . . I've seen it twice and expect to see
it many more times; for it's impossible to comprehend'it on one or two viewings . .. I think it may
come to occupy in the realm of movies the place that Alice in Wonderland and Gulliver's Travels
hold in literoture. Yellow Submarine is definitely for the old as well as the young, and for all age-
groups in between . .. The first time I saw it I wasn't sure it had a story-line so engrosed was I by
the multiplicities with which I wbs stimulated, visually and sonically, on disparate cultural levels
(philosophical, sociological, historical, mythological, psychiatric). The visuals are crudely drawn, but
this makes no difference, for they are imaginative in the best sense of that abused word. They de-
rive from Heironymus Bosch, from Salvador Dali and surrealism, f r o m pop art, and, contemporary
comic strips, science fiction and modness in general.
The visuals are puns and allusions that relateto almost as many aspects of human experience as do
the puns in Finnegan's Wake. So many are "throwaway" lines that it's impossible to r e oc t fast
enough to catch them all, not to mention pondering them . . . No music ever married visuals more
happily. And no feature-length cartoon ever engrossed eye and ear more harmoniously ... the story
is less important than the gags, puns, phantasies, and allusions about humarvexperience-past, pres-
ent, and future ... Please see Yellow Submarine more than once."-Henry Hart, Editor, in FILMS IN
REVIEW, December 1968 (Publication of the Nat. Board of Motion Pictures, Inc.)

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