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February 04, 1972 - Image 8

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1972-02-04

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:C^
Page Eight

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Friday, February 4, 1972

Page Eight THE MICHIGAN DAILY
r

DORM PROBLEMS:
Communcation gap creates
bad relations between races

(Continued from Page 1)
be established in the dorm. The
idea stemmed from complaints of
excessive noise in predominately
white corridors, and a lack of
representation on Stockwell House
Council.
The issue of the corridor was
raised at yesterday's Housing Poli-
cies Committee meeting, and was
placed on the agenda for future
meetings.
The issue of the black corridor
has been a controversy for several
months. At the time the idea was
formulated, several Stockwell resi-
dents described the proposal.
One black student says there
has always been a trend toward
black separatism at Stockwell, and
that what has always been present
is now coming out into the open.
She cites lack of acceptance from
whites as preventing integration
from working.
Another black adds that separ-
ation, such as that daily seen in
the dining hall, helps to bury
hostilities that may be present be-
tween blacks, and whites.
The extent of black unity at

Stockwell is questionable. Though
one black studlent says "m o s t
blacks in this dorm have the same
feelings about the black-white re-
lationship," another reports that
black attitudes vary widely among
individual blacks, ranging from
apathetic to militant.
At East Quad, a separate coun-
seling office for black students-
the Abeng Office-has been estab-
lished to co-ordinate black activi-
ties, plan black social functions,
and help alleviate racial tensions
as well as counsel black students.
There is also one black member in
the Representative Assembly, East
Quad's governing body.
According to Harvey Slaughter.
counselor from the Abeng -Office.
black students at East Quad reflect
the attitudes of blacks throughout
the University. He says integra-
tion is not a reality, that blacks
still tend to stick together socially.
Reggie Burks. Resident Fellow
at East Quad agrees that black
students are unified. "In a mo-
ment of crisis, we are ready to
mobilize," he says.
Burks cites political and eco-

nomic differences as causes for the
division between blacks and whites
He says most of the whites in
East Quad are "wealthy, bleeding-
heart liberals," who have different
interests than blacks and cannot
understand the black point of
view.
There have been no major con-
frontations between blacks and
whites at East Quad this year.
Burks acknowledges an incident in
which comments made by a "bel-
ligerent" white student caused sev-
eral angry blacks to gather, but
Burks and the white Resident
Fellow prevented the incident from
going further, he says.
For the most part, "whites try
as much as possible to ignore
blacks, and blacks try as much as
possible to ignore whites," Slaugh-
ter says. f
He adds there have been re-
quests for an all-black corridor at
East Quad in the past and there
probably will be again in the fu-
ture.
One of the white members of
the East Quad Representative As-
sembly requested that blacks live
in a separate area, Burks says.
And, he added, though blacks are
not against the idea, they don't
want it "f o r c e d down their
throats."
Slaughter says he petitioned the
Representative Assembly to with-
draw funds paid by black students
-$12 for each student in the
Residential College, and $5 for the
majority of the black East Quad
residents who are not in the Resi-
dential College. These funds are
now in the Abeng Office's account,
he explains, to be used in the in-
terest of black students.
IIa

HEW will
estudy 'U'
-" -"
(Continued from Page 1)
who has attended a University
sponsored training program with-
in the past two years.
According to Emily Gardener of
the Staff Benefits office, the in-
service training programs are ex-
clusively for supervisors, leaving
those clerical personnel who as-
pire to those positions without
training.
"I think they have a legitimate
gripe," said Gardener. "They have
sessions in typing improvement
and descriptions of different
business procedures, but nothing
on the skills they need to get
ahead."
Another problem touched upon
is the question of the validity of
nepotism rules. Most women feel
academic appointments should be
made on the basis of qualifica-
tions, not marriage ties. On the
surface, the University's poilcy on
nepotism is quite neutral.
It reads in part that, "No in-
dividual shall be assigned to a de-
partment or unit under the super-
vision of a relative who has or
may have a direct effect on the in-
dividual's progress or perform-
ance . '

Fishbowl rally to protest
North Ireland violence

By JANET GORDON
A rally to protest recent v i 0-
lence in Northern Ireland will be
held today at noon in the Fish-
bowl.
The rally's organizer, Bernard
Cullen, who left Northern Ireland
last year, cited the. killing of 13
people-in Londonderry by British
troops last Sunday at an anti-gov-
ernment demonstration as the "lat-
est atrocity of British occupation
troops."
"The demonstration," Cullen ex-
plained, "was a protest against
the internment of Irish political
prisoners in concentration camps
near Belfast."
The camps, he felt, are "blat-
ant" examples of the denial of

civil rights in Ireland by the Brit-
ish and "the puppet governments
of Dublin and Belfast."
Cullen expressed hopes that the
rally will "help counteract t h e
British propaganda coming o v e r
the media through the government
censors." He explained that he
hopes to create an atmosphere of
awareness about the plight of the
Irish and to keep discussion go-
ing.
The ad hoc group working on
the rally may, according to Cul-
len, solidify into a more formal
organization to promote its goal of
supporting Irish resistance to the
British.

THE WORK STUDY PROGRAM
. . . if you are a full-time student of the Univ. of Michigan
. . . if you come from a low income family
. . . if you can show substantial financial need through
Financial Aid application
You may be eligible for the Work Study Program for Spring/
Summer term. We offer job opportunities with Detroit and
N.Y. Urban Corps, the National Forest Service, and various
off-campus agencies and University departments.
For application and more information
APPLICATIONS DUE MARCH 1
Inquire at 2011 SAB - 763-2151

.1

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Our now shipment of OptAo pedic
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than you'd expect as a recent college graduate. You'll
work with lawyers on interesting . legal problems-and
the rewards will grow as you do.
A representative of The Institute. for Paralegal Train-
ing will conduct interviews on:
THURSDAY, DECEMBER 2

British to increase troop
strength in North Ireland

FOR WOMEN:

-Sand, Brown and Blue Suede
-White and Blue Smooth Leather

i

$14.00

(Continued from Page 1)
An advance party of the 550-
man 2nd Battalion Light Infantry
flew out of England yesterday.1
The rest will leave by ship today.
Army headquarters said the re-
inforcements were dispatched as
"a precautionary measure" for the
civil rights silent protest march
planned for the tough border city
of Newry on Sunday.
March organizers said the dem-
onstration is intended as a tribute
"to those who died for democracy"
during a similar march in London-
derry last Sunday. Thirteen men
and boys were killed in clashes
with British paratroopers.

More paratroopers are also be-
ing sent to Northern Ireland, but
as replacements, not reinforce-
ments.
The paratroopers have borne the
brunt of civil rights accusations of
brutality while breaking up march-
es staged in defiance of emergency
laws against processions.
British Prime Minister Edward
Heath appealed to Lynch, William
Cardinal Conway, Roman Catholic
primate of all Ireland and John
Cardinal Heenan, the British pri-
mate, to intercede with civil rights
leaders to have the Newry march
called off.

FOR MEN:

-Brown Suede only

$16. 0

Inquire at Placement Office
for exact location of interview

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

U of M Students,
Faculty and Staff
WINTER: LOVE IT
or LEAVE IT
BAHAMAS--
Freeport
8 DAYS,7 NIGHTS
March 5 to 12
$159.00
HAWAII-
Waikiki Beach

NOTE: If registration for this seminar is filled, come any-
way-we'll try to talk to you. Or call us collect at the
number shown below.

U

Van Boven Shoes

The Institute for
Paralegal Training
13th floor, 401 Walnut St., Phila., Pa. 19106.
(215) WA 5-0905

17 Nickels Arcade

665-7240

Store Hours: 9:00 to 5:30, Mon.-Sat.

master charge
.. (PE INTERBANK CFP O"

_ -

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The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the Univer-
sity of Michigan. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN FORM to
409 E. Jefferson, before 2 p.m. of
the day preceding publication and
by 2 p.m. Friday for Saturday and
Sunday. Items appear once only.
Student organization notices are
not accepted for publication. For
more information, phone 764-9270.
FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 4
Day Calendar
Astronomy Colloquium: S. Hill, MSU,
"Shock Wave Phenomena in RR Lyrae
Atmospheres," P&A Colloq. Rm., 4 pm.
Hillel, Residential Coll., Political St.:
S. Avineri, Hebrew Univ., Jerusalem,
"Marx's Philosophy of History and the
European World," Aud. A, Angell Hall
4 pm.
Goddard House Players: Saroyan's
"Hello Out There" and Carpenter's
"Muck" Residential Coll. Aud., 8 pm.
Hockey: Michigan vs. Colarado, Coli-
seum, 8 pm.
International Folk Dance: Barbour
Gym, 8 pm.,
General Notices
The History Make-up Examination
will be held Sat., Feb. 5, 10-12 noon,
Rm. 429 Mason Hall; consult your in-
structor, then sign list in Hist. Ofc.
3601 Haven Hall.
Attention Zoology Concentrators:
Make appointments for preclassifica-
tion in 2091 Nat. Sci. as follows; grad-
uating seniors, Feb. 7-11; other upper-
classmen, Feb. 14-18; second semester
sophomores, Feb. 21-25.
Environmental Health Seminar: D. H.
Byers, "Occupational Safety and Health
Act of 1970," Sch, of Pub. Hlth. II
Aud., Mon. Feb. 7, 1 pm.
Attention Second Semester Sopho-
mores in LSA: Concentration meetings;
Amer. Culture, Feb. 7, 4 pm., 411 Ma-
son Hall; English, Feb. 21, 4 pm., 2235
Angell Hall and Feb. 28, 4 pm., 2235
AH; History, Mar. 1, 4 pm., 429 Mason
Hall; Math, Feb. 10, 4:30 pm., 3209 An-
gell Hall; Microbiol., Feb. 8, 4 pm., 229
-Angell Hall; Philos., Feb. 8, 4 pm., 1433
Mason Hall; Physics, Feb. 7, 4 pm., 1041
RandallsLab; Po1. Sci., Feb. 7, 4 pm.,
429 Mason Hall; Psychol., Feb. 22, 3
pm., 1025 Angell Hall; Russian, Feb. 10,
4 pm., Common Rm. Lane Hall; Speech,
Feb. 17, 4 pm., 2203 Angell Hall; all
other concentrations will not have
meeting.
SUMMER PLACEMENT
February -1, 1972
INTERVIEW
Camp Mataponi, Maine, Girls, will
interview Tues., Feb. 8, 10:30;4:30 p.m.
Openings include supervisory asst. (25
or up), waterfront, landsports, arts, na-
ture, camperaft and tripping (20 and
I.fl

up); register in person or by phone;
further details avail.
INTERVIEW
Miss Liberty: London, England, cleri-
cal openings in London, typing must
be 50 wds. perm.; will interview Mon.,
Feb. 7, 3-5 p.m.; register by phone or
in person.

518 E
5 USED AND RARE BOOKS
" FIRST EDITIONS
" ART BOOKS
9ar
* BOOKS I N SETS

E. WILLIAM STREET
668-7653
n-6 pm-Mon.-Sat.

BRING THIS ALONG
C' for a 10% discount on any
USED book in the store. Good
only Friday and Saturday, Feb- *
t ruary-4and 5

* We Search Out-of-Print Books
Collectors-let us know your interests

BOOK

SALE

COLLECTED DRAWING OF AUBREY BEARDSLEY.
by Arthur Symons. 200 full page drawings. $2.98!
TUDOR SERIES OF ART: 2.95
(each volume with at least 90 full color
plates.)
Dali/Miro Klee
PicassQ Van Gogh
Chagall Medieval Art
others

For the student body:
FLARES
by
" Levi
Farah
Wright

ART OF E.L. KIRCHNER. by Grohmann. A fine study t
of Germany's master Expressionist. 128 plates, with
57 in psychedelic color. Pub. at 15.00 Now 4.98
WORLD TAPESTRY: from its Origins to the Present.
by Madeleine Jarry. Covers every tapestry and weav-
ing technique in the world. 200-plus illus. 36 in
color. Pub. at 30.00. Now 16.95
ON THE ROYAL HIGHWAY OF THE INCAS. by
Ubbelohde-Doering. 271 photos of the Andes and
Inca country, sculpture and artifacts. Pub. at 17.50.
Sale 9.95t
HISTORY OF AMERICAN COSTUME: 1607-1870.
by Elizabeth McClellan. 800 illus., definitive workr
of early American dress. Pub. at 12.50. Now 5.95
PICASSO IN CATALONIA. by Joseph Paloui Fabre I
161 reproductions, 72 in full color plus 56 rare j
photos and documents. Published at 35.00. Sale at
25.00l
ZELDA: A BIOGRAPHY, by Nancy Milford. F. Scott's
Dame. If you didn't buy one at $10.00, you can buy l
in at the Borders Book Shop for 2.98. Unlike chicken
it didn't spoil over the summer.

BERNARD B U F F ET LITHOGRAPHS 1952-1966.
Printed .in a limited edition, a fine collection of
Buffet's later lithographs. In slipcase. Pub. at 37.50.
Now 14.95
WILLIAM BLAKE AND THE AGE OF REVOLUTION.
by J. Bronowski. This study of Blake's life first pub-
lished in 1944 had a strong influence on the accept-
ance of Blake as the greatest lyric poet. Published at
5.00. Now 1.98
HISTORY OF ANCIENT ART. J.J. Winckelmann.
18th century classic on the history and principles of
Greek Art. With reproductions of Winckelmann's line
drawings. 2 volumes published at 35.00. Now 17.50
WILLIAM MORRIS: His Life, Work ir Friends. by
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study of Morris. Orig. $9.95. Now 3.98
PICASSO'S THIRD DIMENSION. by Con Mili. 129
photos, 74 full color. A sensational sequence of photos
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GREAT DRAWING OF ALL TIME. Ed. by Ira Mosko-
withz. 4 quarto volumes. Printed in a limited edition,
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ANATOMY OF MELANCHOLY.Robert Burton. Com-
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fiction style. 4.00
ETHIOPIAN PAINTING. by Jules Leroy. 60'full color
tipped in plates, 14 photos. Exotic paintings by me-
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Extraordinary '14.95
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DALI: THE JERUSALEM BIBLE. with approx.
30 full color plates of Dali's illustrations of the
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HEAVEN AND HELL IN WESTERN ART. by R.
Hughes. 200-plus rich illustrations in color and
monochrome. How Heaven and Hell inspired the
works of most of the great masters. Pub. at 17.50.
Now 4.95
LA CUISINE: Secrets of Modern French Cooking. by
Raymond Oliver. 890 pp. 1500 recipes, 680 photos
and charts, 96 color plates. Fine book. Published at
27.50. Now, 13.95
GAUDI: Architecture of Anticipation. A fine new
study of Gaudi's 18th or 22nd architecture. 25.00
ROSENBACH CATALOGUES. Facsimile ed., in ten
volumes of the 74 catalogues of the famous, late
Dr. A.S.W. Rosenbach, the most renowned bibliophile
of this century. Index and cross reference. Published
at $495.00. Now 145.00
MARX. by Robert Payne. Massive and profound biog-
raphy that illuminates the life, thought and influence
bf Karl Marx. 52 illus. Pub. at 10.00. Now 4.98
BAROQUE AND ROCOCCO. by Scheverell Sitwell.
96 illustrations, 16 in color. Captures the spirits of
Baroque style in architecture, painting, sculpture
and. furniture. Pub. at 12.95. Now 5.98
DEAR BERTRAND RUSSELL. An informative selec-
tion of his correspondence with the general public
1950-1968. Pub. at 5.95. Now 1.00
PHILOSOPHICAL FISHERMAN. by Harold Blaisdell.

$

*

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