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February 04, 1972 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1972-02-04

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Friday, February 4, 197

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

page o-nn

Friday, February 4, 1 97 THE MICHIGAN DAILY

BRUINS BOMB

t

Flyers
By The Associated Press
PHILADELPHIA - The Detroit
Red Wings blew a chance to take
over sole possession of fourth place
in the National Hockey League's,
East Division last night as they'
bowed to the Philadelphia Flyers
5-4.
The Red Wings pulled out to an
early 2-1 lead at the end of the
first period on two goals by Mar-f
cel Dione. The two goals by Dione,
his 13th and 14th of the season
gave the Wings an early 2-0 lead
which held up until Bill Flett tal-
lied for the Flyers with less than
a minute and a half left in the
first period.
The Flyers blitzed Wing goalie
Al Smith with three goals in the
second period to take a 4-2 ad-
vantage. Bobby Clarke Ed Joyal
and Gary Dornhofer notched the
three goals of the period for
Philadelphia. The Flyers outshot
the Wings in the period 13-6 en-
route to gaining the lead.
The two teams traded third
period goals with each getting ten
shots. The Flyers had 36 shots for
the game to the Wings 31. -
* * *
Penguins pounce
ST. LOUIS - Bryan Hextall

slam

ings
The victory was only the third
in 25 games for Pittsburgh, which
moved out of last place in the
NHL's west division. The Pen-
gpuins' last triumph on the road
was over the Blues here last Nov.
9.

daily
sports
NIGHT EDITOR:
CHUCK DRUKIS

-Associated Press
WORLD FIGURE SKATING champion Beatrix Schuba from Aus-
tria practices her school figures, which she performs with the
precision of a draftman's compass, on the eve of the Olympic
event. Twenty-one year old Miss Schuba, who has the build of a
tlbitberjack and the pulse of a well oiled clock, claims she will
be unbeatable.

snapped a 3-3 deadlock with his
team's second power play goal at
12:39 of the final period, lifting
the Pittsburgh Penguins to a 4-3
National Hockey League victory
over the faltering St. Louis Blues
last night.
Hextall's goal, his 14th of the
season, climaxed a Pittsburgh
comeback after St. Louis surged
to a 3-1 lead at 14:10 of the first
period on' Frank St. Marseille's
second goal.
The Blues, losers of four in a
row, applied the early pressure on
St. Marseille's 12th of the season
at 7:06 and Terry Crisp's 5th
shorthanded goal of the year at
12:36.
But ex-Blue Ron Schtck trim-
med the lead to 3-2 at 4:33 of
the middle period and rookie Steve
Cardwell deflected in his first
NHL goal to tie for Pittsburgh in
setting up Hextall's clincher.
SThis Weekej

North Stars fall
BOSTON - The Boston Bruins
scored two goals in the first min-
ute and 44 seconds of play last
night and went on to defeat the
Minnesota North Stars 6-1 in- a
National Hockey League contest.
Fred Stanfield tipped in a Bobby
Orr slap shot at the 47-second
mark and Wayne Cashman fol-
lowed less than a minute later
when he jammed in a rebound of
a Dallas Smith shot.
Minnesota cut the margin to 2-1
at 14:08 when Danny Grant took
a pass from Jude Druin and beat
goalie Eddie Johnston from 20
feet on a power play.
Boston increased its margin to
4-1 with second period goals by
Eddie Westfall and Johnny Bucyk.
Johnston registered his third as-
sist of the season on Bucyk's goal,
tying the NHL record for most
assists by a goalie.
Mike Walton added a power
play goal for the Bruins in the
third period, and Don Marcotte
scored with 1:26 to play.

:-Assoclated Press
PITTSBURGH PENGUIN goalie Jim Rutherford makes a typically brilliant save of a shot by St.
Louis' Gary Unger. Jack Egers of the Blues is checked by two Penguins as he attempts to move in.
WIN DOUBLES:

Netters satisfied w

CROSS-COUNTRY SKIING:

Russia wins gold medal

r
1
i

rd in Sports

By The Associated Press
SAPPORO, Japan - Vyacheslav
Vedenin, one of the aces of Rus-
sia's power Nordic skiing team,
won the first gold medal of the
Eleventh Winter Olympic Games
today when he finished first in
the men's 30-kilometer cross-coun-
try race.
The race began in heavy snow
and Vedenin, a silver medalist is
the 50-kilometer race in the 1968
W i n t e r Games at Grenoble,
France, lay comfortablly back in
the early stages. But at the 12.4-
mile mark he surged from seventh
place into the lead and held off
Paal Tyldum of Norway to win.
Vedenin was timed in 1 hour, 36
WINTER
OLYMPICS
minutes, 31.15 seconds to 1:37.25.30
for Tyldum for the 30 kilometers
which is 18.6 miles. Johns Har-
viken of Norway was third in
1:37.32.44.
Franco Nones of Italy, the 1968
Olympic champion in 18.6-mile
cross-country, was in Sapporo but
did not enter the race which was
held over rolling terrain in periods
of snow and sunshine.
One of the top favorites for the
race this year, Gerhard Grimmer
S of East Germany, dropped out just
before the start of the race be-
cause of a bad cold he developed

gold medal of the Winter Olympic
Games today, walking away with
the 5,000 meters race in 7 minutes,
23.61 seconds.
Norwegians took the silver and
bronze medals. Roar Gronvold was
second in 7:28.18 and Sten Stensen
was third in 7:33.39.
All the luck was against Schenk
and he still won the race in a
canter. He skated first in heavy
snow and later his rivals had clear
weather and still couldn't get near
his time.
The times at Makomanai outdoor
rink were slow by world stand-
ards. Schenk narrowly failed to
beat the Olympic record of 7:22.40,
set by Fred Anton Maier of Nor-
way in Grenoble in 1968. The
Dutchman was way outside his
own world record of 7:12.00.
Walfgang Zimmerer and Peter
Utzschneider of West Germany
posted the best times today in each
of the first two heats to take a
solid leadsat the halfway point of
the Olympic two-man bobsled
championships:
Zimmerer and Utzschneider rum-
bled down the 1,563-meter course
on Mount Teine in 1 minute 14.81
seconds in the first heat and
1:14.56 in the second heat for a
total of 2:29.37. Nine of the other
sleds were able to break 1:15.
Jean Wicki and Edy Huzacher
of Switzerland were in second
place after the first two heats with
1:15.61 and 1:15.36 for a total of

meters and, with style included in
the point scoring, he had 210.0.
Alexandre Nossov of Russia was
third with 201.3. His best jumps.
were 79.5 and 77.5.
The 15-kilometer cross country:
race, the second part of this com-
bined championship, will be Satur-
day.

TODAY
HOCKEY-Colorado, at Michigan Coliseum, 8 p.m.
WRESTLING-at Iowa.
TOMORROW
BASKETBALL-at Purdue
HOCKEY-Colorado, at Michigan Coliseum, 8 p.m.
WRESTLING-at Minnesota.
GYMNASTICS--Minnesota, at Crisler Arena, 1:30 p.m.
TRACK-at Indiana.

By RANDY PHILLIPS I
Michigan's netters did not fair
all that well in last weekend's Na-
tional Amateur Indoor Tourna-
ment held at Salt Lake City, Utah,1
but they did as well as expected1
against the tough competition. E
The Wolverines sent four play-
ers to the tournament, Jeff Mil-
ler, Jerry Karzen, Tim Ott, and1
Kevin Senich.
Miller had the most successful
time against the nation's top col-
lege players as he beat Utah fresh-
man Andy Webb in the first round
before succumbing to the tourna-4
ment's fourth seeded player in1
three sets.I
Miller knocked Webb off 6-4,c
6-1 before falling to F. D. Rob-
bins 6-2, 1-6, 6-1. Robbins is
Utah's number one singles player,
and he survived through the finals
of the tournament.
None of the other three Wolver-
ines could win in their opening
-ound matches in singles play, but
their losses were all fairly close.
\1 i-c h i g a n coach Brian Eisner
opined: "The scores were good
Against top people. Everyone came
back feeling extremely positive
about the results."
Ott teamed up with Miller to
defeat Southern Methodist's doub-
FOLLETTS
OPEN ON
SATURDAY
9:30 A.M. to 4:30 P.M.

les team of George Hardy and Jim
Walthall, 6-3, 6-3. However, in the
second round the Wolverine duo
could not break through against
UCLA's Steve Krulevitz and Ron
Kornell as they went down to a
6-4, 3-6, 6-2 defeat.
Karzen and Senich lost in the
first round of doubles competition
to Robbins and Ken Woodard, 6-3,
6-4.
Eisner was cautiously pleased
with the results of the tournament.
He remarked:
"At this stage of the seasdn I
did not think they would do better
than that. We would have liked to
have done more winning but the'
caliber of competition was ex-

'ith trip
tremely good."
This tournament marked the
first outside competition for Mich-
igan's netters this season, and this
fact put the Wolverines at a, dis
advantage to the west coast play
ers.
Also last weekend, two other
Michigan racketmen tried thei
hands in tournament competitior;
Guy Illalaole and Steve Montros
competed in the Wisconsin Invi.
tational 'ournament. Illalaole won
his first two matches before-iall-
itg to ?dike Ducey;ydeflatt'Ifter
twisting his ankle. Montross won
his first match but lost to Gra'
han Snook of Southern Illinois in
the second round.
r1

IT

IF

Financial Ai*d for 193
* APPLICATION PROCEDURES
All necessary application materials and informa
tion are available at the Office"of Financial Aid,
(OFA), 2011 Student Activities Building..
* TYPE OF AID AVAILABLE
THROUGH -THE OFA .. . .. ..;
1) Undergraduates: Grants, Loans, and Work
Study
2) Graduates: Loans and Work Study
3) Foreign Students: Short-Term Loans and
Foreign.Studentbcholarships ,.
* APPLICATION DEADLINES
Spring/Summer 1972 - March, 1972, (priority or
the limited funds will be given to graduating sen-
iors and new students }
Fall/Winter 1972 - May 1 , 1 72 for first priority
consideration
Foreign Student Scholarships -- March 31, 1972

overnight.
Ard Schenk, a 23-year-old Dutch-!2:30.97.
man, won the first speed skating Horst Flot and Pepi Bader of
West Germany were third with
g1:16.04 and 1:15.38 for 2:31.42.
y The final two heats will be run
' SCO R ES Saturday to determine the cham-
pions.

II

F

,I

North Carolina 71, Wake Forest 59
Jacksonville 102, Furman 87
Davidson 84, VMI 61
Tufts 87, Brandeis 75
BYU 70, New Mexico 62
4l Utah 76, Texas-El Paso 61
St. Louis 63, Tulsa 61
Southwestern La. 87, Arkansas St. 73
Connecticut 89, Georgetown 81
Marshall 102, Cleveland St. 70
Lenoir Rhyne 81, Pfeiffer 71
Houghton 111, Berkshire Christian 75
Lebanon Valley 101, Johns Hopkins 68
Sacred Heart 98, Adephi 67
r. Harris Teachers 94, Principia 81

! Hideki Nakano of Japan won the1
jumping competition today in the
WinterdOlympic Games' Nordic
combined skiing.
The college student from Tokyo
had best jumps of 82 and 81 meters
for a total of 220.5 points at the
70 - meter 229.65 - foot Miyanomori
Jumping Hill.
Second in the jumping was
Rauno Miettinen of Finland. He' Ke
had best jumps of 77.5 and 79

Post time!
The Daily Libels; who will complete their 82nd straight undefeated football season next fall, have
broadened their horizons by adding horseracing to their long list of successful athletic endeavors.
Here we see Libel Chip Papanek on his way to a victory in the season's initial outing. The only cas-
ualty occurred when the back of "Bubba" Constrictor's horse was broken while he attempted to mount
the animal.
ABA
East Division
entucky 40 12 .769. Pet GB I Wl f '

..4 ............ n..... . x?. . . . . . . .r.....:: *. .."$1.. .
Professional League Standings Y

Boston
New York
Montreal
Detroit
Toronto
Vancouver
Buffalo
Chicago
Minnesota
California;
St. Louis
Philadelphia
Pittsburgh
Los Angeles

NHL
East Division
w L T
36 7 8
32 10 8
28 13 8
22 22 10
21 21 10
14 28 5
10 30 13
West Division
34 11 15
27 17 8
17 25 10
17 28 7
15 26 8
13 29 9
14 33 6

Pts GF
80 207
72 215
64 189
52 164
52 137
33 117
32 133
73 168
62 138
44 147
41 141
38 120
35 117
34 127

C
Baltimore
GA Atlanta
109 1Cincinnati
113 Cleveland
134
166 Wes
146
158M
196 Milwaukee
Chicago
96 Phoenix
117 Detroit
190 P
172 Los Angeles
156 Golden State
163 Seattle
206 tHouston
Portland

entral Division
24 28
20 33
17 35
17 38

.462
.377
.327
.309

4%l
7

stern Conference

FEBRUARY ARTFAIR
WHEN: Sunday, February 6, 12-5 P.M.
WHERE: Michigan Union Ballroom
WHAT: Artists Displaying and Selling Their Crafts
WHO: Open to Everyone; No Admission Charge
Artists interested in selling or displaying their work should call 764-7409
or go to room 240 Michigan Union for information and registration. Regis-
tration closes Friday, Feb. 4.
SPONSORED BY: STUDENT GOVERNMENT COUNCIL:. "
OFFICES OF SPECIAL SERVICES AND PROGRAMS
UNIVERSITY ACTIVITIES CENTER
NOTICE TO CIVILIANS
NOW BIVOUAC HAS
RECYCLED CLOTHES FOR YOU-
" Clark Kent coats o Naval pancake hats
" Captain Kangaroo coats " Beetle Baily hats
" Recycled Navy bell * Prison jaCkets
bottom jeans 6 Fatigue shirts
~cvccworkits* Fatiaue Dants

idwest Division
45 11
38 17
32 25
19 36
acific Division
44 7
33 21
32 24
20 34
12 44

.804
.691
.561
.345
.863
.611
.571
.370
.214

13/
12/
14 f2
251,
34y2

I

Yesterday's Results
Philadelphia 5, Detroit 4
Boston 6, Minnesota 1
New York 4, Buffalo 2
Pittsburgh 4, St. Louis 3
Montreal at Los Angeles, inc.

Hi F Studio
Student Hqrtrs. for Famous
Quality Components
COME DOWNTOWN & SAVE
121 W. Washington
NO 8-7942

SIDEWALK SALE
FRIDAY and SATURDAY (weather permitting)
AT

Boston
New Y
Philade
Buffalo

EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L P
39 18 .68
ork 31 22 .58
'Iphia 23 31 .4
15 37 .28

Pet
i84
15
26
:8$

GB
6
14?>
21 '

Yesterday's Results
Atlanta at Golden state, inc.
Today's Games
Cincinnati at Boston
New York at Buffalo
Seattle at Cleveland
Detroit at Philadelphia
Chicago at Baltimore
Golden State at Phoenix
Milwaukee at Los Angeles
Houston at Portland

I

-____________________ ________E

WII4IJ 6

I'

SQUARE DANCE
Friclav Februnrv 4th

SURVIVAL MEANS SACRIFICE
Before you make contribution please realize that:
$11.96 buys 3 stereo LP's $10.20 buys a daily hot meal for a
$10.20 buys ounce of marijuana school child in Morocco
$23.00 buys a day of skiing at (3 months)

11

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