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February 01, 1972 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1972-02-01

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Rage, Eight

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Tuesday, February 1, 1972

I-

SACUA REVIEWS POLICY
Regents to receive assembly research plan

By TED STEIN
As a result of action by the
faculty executive body yester-
day, the recently-passed Senate
Assembly resolution on classified
research will be presented to the
Regents at their February meet-
ing. No firm procedures were
set for its enforcement.
The Senate Advisory Com-
mittee on University Affairs,
(SACUA), decided not to call a
special Senate Assembly meet-
ing to further discuss the re-
search plan.
The assembly, the faculty
representative body, has ap-
proved a proposal banning clas-
sified research "the clearly for-
seeable result or any specific
purpose of which is to destroy
human life or to incapacitate
human beings.
It also denies any industrial
or proprietary research "that
limits open publication of the
results of research beyond ap-
proximately one year."

The plan must be finally ap-
proved by the Regents prior to
its implementation.
In passing the Research poli-
cy Committee report on proprie-
tary research last week, the as-
sembly failed to deal with cer-
tain procedural matters - espe-
cially the creation of a research
committee to review exception
to the plan.
At that time, psychology Prof.
Warren Norman, the assembly's
chairman, ruled a motion to
adopt the procedures out-of-or-
der.
The procedures, contained in
an earlier assembly resolution
against classified r e s e a r c h
passed last year, called for the
creation of a 12-member com-
mittee to review all research
proposals.
The committee would be com-
posed of two members who are
philosophically opposed to clas-
sified research, two members en-
gaged in classified research at

the time of their appointment,
and two student members.
Instead, the research policy
proposal will be submitted at the
Regents' February m e e t i n g
a 1 o n g with the suggested
amendments.
An important amendment to
the research proposal which will
be presented to the Regents,
concerns medical research which
could be denied.
The amendment, proposed by

medical Prof. Dorin Hinerman,
SACUA member, says that "clin-
ical research which may carry
some risk to human health may
be exempted from this restric-
tion if the benefit/risk ratio is
high and if the project is ap-
proved by the Human Use
Committee."
The Human Use Committee
.must approve any research pro-
ject which involves experimen-
tation with human subjects.

Dorm thefts increasing
despite security cautions

Controversial bypass
approved by Council

(Continued from Page 1)
Most dorms simply lock all un-
guarded doors at night. Yet a res-
ident advisor at Markley Hall
knocks the strictest of systems
saying, "I have serious doubts
about its validity."
"The card system may deter
someone who is casually trying to
get in, but anyone who has been
around the dorm at all knows how
easy it is to get inside without a
security card," he said.
In the face of this seemingly
undefeatable problem, the Housing
Office is stepping up its attempts
to awaken students to the omni-
presence of thievery.
U'prepares
for weekend

In September, all residents re
ceived a letter listing ways to hel:
prevent thefts.
Bright orange signs are now be
ing placed around the dorms in
forming residents of many pre
ventive measures and warnin
them to lock their doors at a:
times, even while sleeping.
One new program started thi
fall in cooperation with the An
Arbor police department is "op
eration identification." Each dor
has an engraver that can be check
ed out by students in order t
place their driver's license riumbe
on any valuable goods.
The number is registered wit
the police and the student given
sticker to identify him as a par
ticipant in the program. It is hope
that the sticker will act as
deterent to would-be-thieves. I
the event that the item is stolen
the identification number woul
make it easier to trace.

By DAVE BURHENN
After a long and impassioned
debate, Ann Arbor City Council
last night approved the Packard-
Beakes Bypass Plan. Passed by a
7-4 vote, the decision apparently
puts an end to a long period of
controversy surrounding the pro-
posal.
The bypass plan, okayed by
voters in a 1966 road bond issue
provides for:
-The alignment of First and
Ashley Streets into Packard by
means of curves;
-The alignment of First and
Ashley into Beakes, which leads
onto the Broadway bridge; and
-The changes of Beakes from
a one way southbound street to
a two way thoroughfare leading
to the bridge.
Originally proposed in 1962, the
plan was primarily designed to
facilitate access to the downtown
area. Proponents last night t pro-
jected the advantages that would
include reduced traffic on central
city streets and the possibility of
blocking off Main St. to build a
mall. With the use of First and
Ashley, -Main traffic would be re-
routed.
Opponents of the plan, many

of whom were in the packed city
hall audience, contended that due
to the slow death of the central
business areas, the original access
justification is no longer relevant.
They argued that the increased
traffic through the Model Cities
neighborhood would do great dam-
age to the area.
In addition, opponents of the
by-pass plan contended that the
plan was formulated without re-
gard to the interests and desires
of Model Cities residents.
Supporters, on the other hand,
say that congestion will result on
Main and other central city streets
if the plan is not, adopted. Accord-
ing to figures compiled, if the
bypass were not constructed, traf-
fic delays of up to five additional
minutes would result by 1980 and
ten minutes by 1990.
Councilman Norris Thomas (D-
First Ward) called the debate over
the bypass plan a "black-white"
issue. He said that some council-
men were playing "little games"
by having "good niggers" come to
speak for the proposal. Thomas
added that there are "dumb nig-
gers and smart niggers" and that
the "smart niggers are not going
to be pleased with this proposal."

HDAILY OFFICIAL
(Continued from Page 1)
HEW's Washington Office of Con- BULLETIN
tract Compliance, to Michigan
Sen. Philip Hart revealed that a::....................
great deal more money was in- TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 1
volved, amounting to over $3 mil-
lion, Day Calendar
Recruitment of women to Uni-
versity positions, salary equity be- Physics Seminar: G. Domokos, John
tween male and female employes Hopkins U., P&A Colloquium Rm., 4 pm
and back pay for women found to Music School: Elizabeth Mosher
be receiving less money than men Kraus, soprano, and Eugene Bossart
in thesamejbcategorieswe piano. Rackham Aud., 8 pm.
o Romance Languages: M. Pierssens, 1
the main promises of the affirma- of Wisconsin, "L'Incolscience de Frew
tive action plan proposed by the a Lacan," W. Conf. Rm. Rackham,
University. pm.
To oversee the execution of the school of Music Lecture: E. Der
program's promises, the Commis- "Joseph Boulonge Chevalier de Sain
r~ormsWpomnisestaCbisedGeorges: Musician and Athlete in 'Ga
sion for Women was established lant' Paris," Sch. of Mus. Recital Hal
the following January. The com- 8 pm.

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AN

4i

University women hold
discrimination discussion

mission became involved with a
systematic cross - department file
review of women suspected of re-
ceiving less salary than their male
counterparts.
Recently, however, commission
members have expressed doubts
that women's problems are taken

Organization Notices
Ann Arbor Abortion Action Coalitio
Feb. 2, 7:00 PM, 1510 SAB. All womei
are welcome and urged to bring back
ground literature on abortion.
LSA Student Government Exe
Council open meeting, 7:00 PM, 3D
Michigan Union.

"

(Continued from Page 1)
head of the unit, such as the per-
sonnel director.
Sklar said the policy "removes
the hiring of women one step fur-
ther into secrecy," leaving no one
to accept the final responsibility
for hiring women.,
She instead recommended that
these parts of the present nepotism
policy be eliminated and that ap-
pointments -for positions be made
with "no, discrimination on the
basis of sex."
Speaking on a "women's com-
mission within a school," educa-
tion Prof. Laura Williams discuss-'
ed the education school's own
Commission for Women.
The group, which includes sec-
retaries, faculty members and stu-
dents, has studied secretarial prob-
Davis' sist(
in courthoi
(Continued from Page 1)
Tamm said, the 18 were arrested.
The demonstrators c h a n t e d
"Free Angela" and carried signs
demanding her freedom.
There was no violence and an-
other 50 persons who were in the
area but not demonstrating were
not held.
Franklin Alexander, co-chairman
)f the National United Committee,
told newsmen that there will be
"15,000 others who will pour into
San Jose to take their places on
the picket line."
C. D. Marron, a sheriff's spokes-
man, said a parking lot one block

lems and admissions to education
school graduate programs.
The commission, according to
Williams, found that women "were'
accepted in higher percentages'
than men, but that many don't'
aim high enough" in seeking doc-
torates.
Rhoda Berkowitz, chief refer-
ence librarian of the Law Library,
also spoke on academic grievance
procedures, and Helen Forsythe, a
law student and a member of the
women's commission, discussed
salary equity. Materials were dis-
tributed to the audience explain-
ing the file review procedure that
checks for sex discrimination and'
salary inequity.
A report was also made by the
women's task force of the political
science department.
r arrested
use protest
from the courthouse had been set
aside for such demonstrations. He
said demonstrations "within sight
and sound of the courtroom" would
not be tolerated.
Inside the courtroom, chief de-
fense attorney Howard Moore Jr.,
said the prosecution has access to
classified government information
about prospective jurors.
"If the prosecution has that in-
formation then the defense should
have it too," he said.
Judge Richard Arnason took the
defense motion under considera-
tion.

seriously by University officials.
In an interview in December.
President Robben Fleming refer-:
red to the Commission as a group:
of "highly activist women." In ad-
dition, he questioned whether sex'
discrimination which was widely
distributed over a culture could:
truly be termed "discrimination."
In response, Commission Chair-
woman Virginia Nordin said, "The
women's commission has made
unusual attempts to get the facts.j
To be dismissed as an activist
group is neither fair nor accu-
rate."
- - -

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Council for
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MASS MEETING
WEDNESDAY

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