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February 01, 1972 - Image 7

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1972-02-01

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Tuesday, February 1, 1972

Page Seve

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Tuesday, February 1, 1972 THE MICHIGAN DAILY Page Sever~

Michigan, Minnesota

pa

.w ir i

out to lunch
mort novock

Continuing controversy ...
r . on a slow decision
THE LIST of those upset with Big Ten Commissioner Wayne
Duke's inaction after the Ohio State-Minnesota brawl is
growing.
Many Big Ten leaders were already upset with the fact that
Duke did nothing while the disturbance was actually happening.
He just sat in the stands and watched the fight without making
an effort to help. It was Minnesota Athletic director Paul Giel
that called the game with 36 seconds to go.
Others lost their patience when Duke took two days to
investigate% the incident before reaching a decision on what
action to take. The man was there, he saw the whole thing,
yet he refused to commit himself until he could see the
films. It makes one wonder whether Duke wanted to see the
films because he enjoyed the fight or whether he fell asleep
at the game and missed the whole thing.
When he finally decided to act, his move was condemned by
all except Minnesota 'coach Bill Musselman as inadequate. It
fact, he really didn't do anything at all. Musselman had already
suspended Corky Taylor and Ron Behagen, all Duke did was to
add his name to the order.
Some were upset because nothing was done to Luke Witte.
The Gopher players may not have impressed anyone as gentle-
men, but even -a brawler has to be provoked before starting a
fight. There's a feeling that Witte must have done something to
make Taylor kick him.
There was also those who thought that something should
have been done to Musselman. There is a sign in the Minnesota
lockerroom stating that death is better than losing because you
don't have to live with death. The idea is that the Gophers are
taught to kill. That their coach will condone anything as long
as it means a victory. This philosophy is not compatible with
the image of college athletics, so some feel that Musselman
should be held responsible for the trouble.
Ohio State coach Fred Taylor is the latest to voice his
disapproval. He called the fight, "public muggings," and
has become very vocal in his criticism. He feels that the pun-
ishment doesn't begin to cover the crime. "The only penalty
is that they will miss nine games," he said. "They are still
on scholarship and they are still practicing with the team."
Taylor thinks that more should be done. He wants the
investigation to reopen and he is urging his injured players to
start legal action. "I think we must seek legal counsel about
civil or criminal action on behalf of Witte and Wagner and I
hope our school would instigate it," he stated Sunday.
Court suits over fights between athletes during games are
not that common, but there is some precedent for Taylor's
action. Wayne Maki was charged with assault and battery after
he clobbered Teddy Green over the head in a National Hockey
League game. He didn't go to jail for it, but the case was
heard in court.
Detroit Tiger manager Billy Martin was held liable for
damages a while back for an incident in which he slugged pit-
cher Jim Brewer. Brewer did not file criminal charges, but he
did start a civil suit and when the case finally got to trial Martin
had to pay up.
Of course the whole OSU incident may just fade away. Witte
and Wagar may return to action tonight and decide to forget
the whole thing. They will probably be under pressure from the
Big Ten not to take action.
If the two players did file suit and win It would make
Duke's action look even more impotent. A commissioner
must be tougher than a court. He should be able to police his
own league without having every dispute turned over to
lawyers.
Professional commissioners are often much more harsh than
the law. Players have been suspended for infractions which are
not illegal. They are deprived of their livlihoods just because
they associate with the wrong people.
However this is not to say that Duke should have done more
to Minnesota. It is possible that his assessment of the situation
is correct and that suspension for the rest of the year is ade-
quate. Where he made his mistake was the way in which he
handled the whole thing. He is the head of the league and is in
the hot seat. Whatever he did, he should have done it quickly
and authoritatively.
The Big Ten needs a strong leader. It will have one, but it
won't be the commissioner if Duke leaves the rest of his de-
cisions open to as much question as this one. It is true that
he doesn't have absolute power, but he could have called the
athletic directors right after the fight and had them vote on
some action. Duke might not be able to act on his own, but he
must be the leader. But he can only lead if he is supported by
the conference, and weak decisions are not going to gain him
support.
Ps...... .......s......... .......
SProfessional League Standings g

By BOB ANDREWS
With the smoke in the process of
clearing after one of the m 0-s t ly
turbulent weeks in Big Ten his- 1
tory, the Michigan and Minnesota
cagers came off big wins Saturday I p o t st
to emerge as the new conference
co-leaders.
The Wolverines mangled the NIGHT EDITOR:
crippled Ohio State Buckeyes 88- RANDY PHILLIPS
78, while Minnesota, minus tvo of
their star performers, played sol-
idly to topple Iowa 61-50. Both and Wagar back for tonight's game
squads ran their conference re- against Iowa and will start action
cords to 5-1, while the loss sent only one half game out of first. As'
the Bucks into third. Michigan head Coach Johnny Orr
Before a sellout crowd in Ann remarked: "There are eight games
Arbor, the Buckeyes played with- left, and there's a long way to
out the services of seven f o o t go."o
center Luke Witte and 6-8 reserve Last Friday, Big Ten Commis-
forward Mark Wagar, who were s i o n e r Wayne Duke, announced
injured in the chaotic free-for-all the suspension of Minnesota cag-
against Minnesota last week. ers Ron Behagen and Marvin
Already without two of their "Corky' Taylor for the rest of the
tallest players, the Buckeyes' cen- season for their part in the mam-
ter, Jack Wolfe, and forward War- moth brawl.
dell Jackson got into early f o u I Nevertheless, against Iowa last
trouble which gave the Wolverines Saturday, the defense-minded
greater control of the boards. Gophers used just five play 'rs to
Although ahead by four at the coast to a 61-50 win. According to
head Coach Bill Musselman,
end of the first half, 11-37, O h i 0 "We were about as ready as we
State finally collapsed under the have been all year."
pressure as three of th.ir play- Indeed this must have been the
ers eventually fouled t. ithout case as his players committed only
starters Wolfe, 6-5 forward Mark 11 fouls throughout the game and
Minor and 6-6 reserve Gary Kira -___ _____

ce Big
managed to hold Rick Williams,
the Hawkeye guard and number
two scorer in the conference, to;
one field goal for two points. In
his two previous games, Williams
had scored 75 points.{
Leading the Gophers in scoring1
was Clyde Turner with 19, while;
Kevin Kunnert paced the Hawk-
eyes with 21.
Although other Big Ten schools
are yelling for more legal action,
against the school, Minnesota
should remain tough and ready as
the chase for the conference
crown continues.
Purdue remained in the running
for first as they nipped lowly
Northwestern 78-75 to run their
record to 2-1. Although they never
trailed, the Boilermakers had it
rough the entire way as the Wild-
cats employed a semi-zone, semi-
man-to-man defense to perplex
them.
"They messed us up with that
defense," commented Purdue coach
George King, "and, frankly, we
weren't prepared." Although it did
manage to stymie Bob Ford (11
points) and Dennis Gamauf (6
points), it didn't hinder Bil1
Franklin, who pumped in 26.
Indiana entered Big Ten play
with an 8-2 record and a national
ranking. However, the winless

Ten
Hoosiers have not been able to
get untracked as Michigan State
sent them to their fourth consecu-
tive conference defeat, 83-73.
Sophomore Mike Robinson and
Bill Wilgore combined for 55 points
as they paced the Spartans to their
second Big Ten victory against
three losses.
Tonight, the Buckeyes, most pro-
bably at full strength, host Iowa
and with a win, could join Michi-
gan and Minnesota for the confer-
ence leadership. The only other
Big Ten team involved in action
is Michigan State, which enter-
tains Notre Dame in a non-con-
ference game.
Big Ten Standingsr_
W L Pet.
MICHIGAN 5 1 .833
Minnesota 5 1 .833
Ohio State 4 1 .800
Purdue 2 1 .677
Wisconsin 2 2 .500
Michigan State 2 3 .400
Illinois 1 2 .333
Iowa 1 3 .250
Northwestern 1 5 .167
Indiana 0 4 .000
Today's Game
Iowa at Ohio State
Only game scheduled

-Daily-Terry McCarthy
MICHIGAN'S big center Ken Brady (15) goes up for two over
Ohio State forward Jack Wolfe (20) during Saturday's victory
over the Bucks. Brady's rebounding and scoring were a major
factor in the 88-78 win which catapulted the Wolverines past
OSU into a tie with Minnesota for the league lead,

cofe, there was little that h e a d
Coach Fred Taylor's squad.could PROFESSIONAL DISPUTE:
do to overcome Michigan's con-
trol of the boards as well as of ther
game. #
straight points in the second half Aub c
to break the game open and the

i tiles

for ace skier

Buckeye offense, which consisted!
of little more than the :hooting
of guard Allan Hornyak, was not
potent enough to bounce beck.'
Even with the victory, Michigan;
could little afford to breatae easy.j
The Bucks should be getting Witte'
Oklahoma 62, Arkansas St. 53
Utah State 96, California 87
Central Michigan 89, Buffalo State 84
St. Bonaventure 90, South Florida 74 t
Maryland 66, North Carolina State
Mississippi 86, Florida 72
St. John's 86, Rhode Island 731
Oral Roberts 112, William Jewel 92
Cleveland State 83, Bowling Green 80
Kentucky 77, Alabama 741
Florida State 109, Pan American 83 C
virginia 62, Clemson 58
Louisiana State 64, Tennessee 62
Temple 53, Drexel 46
Jacksonville 91, Furman 90
Western Kentucky 71, Murray State 71

By The Associated Press
SAPPORO, Japan-Austria bat-
tled today to regain Olympic elig-
ibility for ace Alpine skier Karl
Schcranz, charging he was banned
with no evidence of professional-
ism and no chance to defend him-
self.
Meanwhile, all Austrian skiers
stayed off the slopes and there was
a threat that they might not com-
pete in the eleventh Winter Olym-
pic Games, which start Thursday.
The International O 1 y m p i c
Committee announced M o n d a y
that Schranz had been banned
from the Games because he took
pay for advertising skis.
In a news conference Monday
night, two high-ranking Austrian
officials maintained that Avery
Brundage, president of the IOC,
had no proof that Schranz had
violated the amateur code of the
Olympics.1

"I can't believe it," said Dr. Karl
Heinz Klee, president of the Aus-
trian Ski Federation, after the 33-
year-old Schcranz was disqualified
by the International Ol y m p i c
Committee for allowing his name
to be used for commercial rea-
sons.
"The Russians are subsidized by
their own- government and all in-
ternational athletes get help from
one source or another," he said.
"It's an emphasis on the wrong
principle. I think the Olympics
should be a contest of all sports-
men with no regard for color, race
or wealth."
There have been reports that
Schranz, who was preparing to
compete in his fourth Olympics,
was earning $40,000-$50,000 a year
from his ski connections. The Aus-
trian did not deny them, but he
contended he was being punished
for a crime of which all athletes
are guilty.
Schranz won a silver medal at
the 1964 Olympics and finished
first in the men's slalom in the
1968 Games, but was disqualified
for missing a gate on his run. The
disqualification caused consider-
able controversy. He appealed the
ruling, but was turned down.
ii

This Week in Sports
TODAY
FRESHMAN BASKETBALL-at Central Michigan
FRIDAY
WRESTLING-at Iowa
HOCKEY-Colorado College at Michigan Coliseum, 8 p.m.
SATURDAY
BASKETBALL-at Purdue
TRACK-at Indiana
WRESTLING-at Minnesota
HOCKEY-Colorado College at Michigan Coliseum, 8 p.m. J
GYMNASTICS-Minnesota at CrisIer Arena, 1:30 p.m.

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N SUERSCOPE,
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The Russians chided Avery Brun-
dage as guilty of bad taste and
criticized the International Olym-
pic Committee Tuesday for singl-
ing out Austria's Karl Schranz for
punishment on the eve of the 11th
Winter Games.
"We did not like Mr. Brundage's
attack on the Winter Games at
the time the games were just
about to open in Japan," he add-
ed. "It was not good to the Japa-
nese."
Jean-Claude Killey said that the
winter Olympic Games will suffer

more than skiing, should the sportI
be scratched from the Olympic
agenda over professional charges.
"I don't see, how skiing can be
eliminated now," said the 28-year-
old Frenchman who won three gold
medals in the 1968 Olympics.
In other Olympic news it has
been learned that a lean, dark-
haired French nobleman, Count
Jean de Beaumont, will be the
next president of the International
Olympic Committee if A v e r y
Brundage retires this year-as he
says-after 20 years.

I

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11

Clearing the boards
Alabama's Wendell Hudson (20)
goes to clear the boards against
Kentucky Wildcat Larry Stam-
per (22) in a game played last
night in Lexington. Coach Adolph
Rupp's boys won a thriller from
the Crimson Tide, 77-74.

FEBRUARY ART .FAIR,
WHEN: Sunday, February 6 12-5 P.M.
WHERE: Michigan Union Ballroom
WHAT: Artists Displaying and Selling Their Crafts
WHO: Open to Everyone; No Admission Charge
Artists interested in selling or displaying their work should call 764-7409
or go to room 240 Michigan Union for information and registration. Regis-
tration closes Friday, Feb. 4.
SPONSORED BY: STUDENT GOVERNMENT COUNCIL
. OFFICES OF SPECIAL SERVICES AND PROGRAMS
UNIVERSITY ACTIVITIES CENTER

-Associated Press

I

Michigan Union Billiards

NBA
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L Pct
Boston 37 18 .673
New York 30 21 .588
Philadelphia 22 31 .415
Buffalo 14 35 .286
Central Division
Baltimore 24 27 .471
Atlanta 20 33 .377
Cincinnati 16 35 .314
Cleveland 16 36 .308
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Midwest Division
Milwaukee 43 11 .796
Chicago 38 15 .717
Phoenix 31 24 .564
Detroit 18 35 .340

Milwaukee vs. Golden State
Cleveland at Buffalo, followed by com-
pletion of protested game of Dec. 3.
GB Only games scheduled
5
14 NHL
21; East Division

PLAY POOL
Half Price
Tues. and Thurs.

Ladies play free
first two hours
Wednesday

- Boston
5 New York
8 Montreal
8w Detroit
Toronto
vancouver
Buffalo
4?
121,EChicago
24s Minnesota
California
St. Louis
Philadelphia
12 Pittsburgh
214Los Angeles
34 Ye

W L T Pts
34 7 8 76
.31 9 8 70
27 13 8 62
21 21 8 50
20 20 10 50
14 28 5 33
10 29 12 32

GF
199
211
186
156
134
117
131
164
135
147
137
115
115
120

Pacific Division
Los Angeles 44 7
Golden State 33 20
Seattle 31 23
Houston 19 34
Portland 12 43
Yesterday's Games
No games scheduled
Today's Games
Boston at Balitmore
Detroit at New York
Phoenix at Portland
Seattle at Chicago

West Division
34 10 5
27 15 8
17 25 10
17 26 7
14 26 8
12 29 9
13 33 6

GA
108
109
133
161
140
158
192
89I
108
190,
165
152
160
202

i

II

73
62
44
41
36
33
32

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esterday's Results

Open 10 a.m. Mon.-Sat.; 1 p.m. Sun.

Something To Beileve In
STUDENT ARTS
and'CRAFTS FAIR
Student Gallery- ist Floor Union

No games scheduled
Today's Games
Montreal at St. Louis
Toronto at Detroit
Chicago at Los Angeles
Only games'Scheduled

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