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January 26, 1972 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1972-01-26

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Page Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Thursday, January 27, 1972

Page Two THE MICHiGAN DAILY Thursday, January 27, 1972

-drama-
lack theater cies out at U'

By JOANNA DANEMAN
Black theater at the U~niver-
sity of Michigan can no longer
be ignored. The University Play-
er s' production of Ceremonies in
Dark Old Men by Lonne Elder
cries out its existence with vehe-
mence propelled by brilliant,
black performers.
Set in a slum barbershop in
Harlem, the characters struggle
through an environment in
which they are predestined for
destruction. In this psyheologi-
cal and social prison the vic-

man who supports her men with
sensitivity and insight into the
psychological problems of the.
relationship between black men
and women in this society.
In the first scene the tempo
seemed a bit restraining for
Hunt, who sometimes' lacked
sufficient. response from Dar-
sealle Head as Parker's eldest
son Theo. By the end of the act,
however, Head boosted his per-
formance up to the level of the.
other members of the cast. Wil-
lie Brown,' as the younger son

Bobby was consistently good
throughout. Nelson Alston, as
Blue Haven was also excellent in
his role of the: racketeer and
victimizer of his fellow black
brothers. He was the instrument
of destruction in the play, and
accurately portrayed himself
not as the villain, but as a fel-
low inmate who is only given the
role to play., He, too, is a casual-
ty of the system. Edward Welch
and LuJuana Tucker were flaw-
less* In their supporting roles,
The :direction of the play did
not establish. itself fully in the
first act;. In the second part
of the* performance, the. power
of the :play,"and the .skilled act-
ing of the performers made up
for the slight deficit. The first
act did, .however set the fore-
boding mood for the passion of
the: second act.
The set' for the play, designed
by, Richard Schreiber, was ver-
satile, complete, and uncumber-
some. It. gave proper mood to
the production with realistic un-
pretentiou s, props that contribut-

ed to the play scenes rather
than distracted. The costuming
by Zelma Weisfeld was expertly
handled, and at all times was
intergral to the production.
Ceremonies is not only a tri-
umph in black talent at the Uni-
versity, it is a political victory.'
For too long a time has the
Speech Department neglected its
important black members, ig-
nored their genius, and was
sparing with the production of
plays belonging to not only
b 1 a c k, but to contemporary
literature. The power and emo-
tion of this production will not
permit this blatant omittance to
occur again. The play will be, at
Mendelssohn Theatre until the
29th and is a rare opportunity
not only to see a fine production
but more so to see the great
potential that these black, gifted
artists have for a living black
'theatre at' the University.
Announcing a Conference
on
WOMEN & RELIGION
from the perspective
of Women's Liberation
Feb. 18G-20
Jewish, Block, & Non-Western
Women Participants Needed to
help run Workshops
ALL INVITED--
if interested please call 764-7442

CEREMONIES1
IN DARK
.::. O D M E
Mendelssohn Theatre
IHRU SAT.
Box Office open 12:30

UAC - DAYSTAR presents

E

I

The Place to Meet
INTERESTING People!
BACH CLUB
Featuring
SUSAN WALLER, flutist
accompanied by
David Cornet
Constantinescu, pianist
3 Bach Sonatas:
B minor
G minor
A major
Refreshments: Aunt Esther's
fish chowder
THURSDAY, JAN. 27
8 p.m.
S. QUAD, W. LOUNGE
No Musical Knowledge Needed
Absolutely Everyone Invited
further info:
663-4875 or 763-6256

"Gordon the great
Lightfoot, finest
singer among
all the folk
troubadours..
A GREAT TRIP
he's euphoric."
-San Francisco
Examiner
"Lightfoot invites
the audience to.
listen' to the
picture flow."1
--Chicago Sun Times
:.. strangely
beautiful
and moving ..:'"
--Daily Express/London

g.

SAT.

9:00 P.M.

GOODBYE COLUMBUS
BURSLEY HALL
25C POPCORN
CHARGE

GORDON LIGHTFOOT
SAT., FEB. 12-8 p.m.--Hill Aud.
TICKETS: $4.50--$3.00--$1 .50
on sale now Michigan Union, noon-6 p.m.
and both Salvation Record Stores

I

-Daily-Rolfe Tessem

tims destroy each other by the
very means they 'design to es-
cape. This is the tragedy, and
the tragedy is a reality of the
black experience in America.
Andre Hunt developed the
role of the former vaudeville
dancer Russell Parker with phe-
nomenal power. His incredible
chant of "Daniel in the. Lion's
Den" prepared the audience for
his even more emotional mono-
logue at the close of the play.
He was equally supported by Lo-
lita Hernandez as Adele, who
played the role of the black wo-
Forest fires born
more than trees

611111
Tonight
MAN WITH
THE MOVIE
CAMERA
Dir. Dziga Vertoy
Russia. 1929, Silent
One of the most' complex and
experimental works in film his-
tory. A dazzling demonstration
of Vertov's "Kino Eye" theory,
questioning the very nature. of
film reality.
i.
ALSO
RCED
N IGHTMARE
narrated by Jak. Webb
Featured in the CBS documnen-
tory Selling of the Pentagon, this
this was made by the U.S. Arm-
ed Forces I nformation"Service to
teach Americans _what_, life in
Hometown, U.S.A.. wo~uld be
like under' Communist ;domnina-
tion.
ARCHITECTURE
AUDITORIUM
7:00 and, 9:00, p.m. 75c

I

CLIP AND SAVE
ii ,
r ,
/ r
_ r
r ,
Ir r
I WCNFM 89.05 7
MUSIC FOR EVERYONE
iiI
I r
r r
'c PROGRAMMING SCHEDULE
.3Sunday Mon.-Thurs.
I'I
'I9-12 Classical 9-11 Morning Show
112-2 Broadway 114 Rock
2-4 Blues 4-7 Folk 1,
r
4-6 Blues and Jazz 7-8 Community.
6-7 Reporters Round Services
STable 8-11 Rhythm and Blues
7-8 Black _Edition 11-3 Progressive Rock
11-3 Progressive Rock
Friday Saturdan
I ,
19-11 Morning Show. 9-5 Rock
I114, Rock 5-6 New Release 1'
146 Folk 6-8 RockI
S 6:30-8 Live Folk8-1RyhanBle
8-11 Rhythm and Blues 11-3 Oldies how
111-3 Progressive Rock I
/I
* LOCAL NEWS ON THE HOUR-EVERY HOUR 5-11 P.M.
it SPORTS WRAP-UP-7:05 & 11:05 P.M.r
r

Rachel, Rachel
dir. PAUL NEWMAN
starring :
JOANNE WOODWARD
75c
JAN. 27, 28, 29
9 P.M.
STO CKWELL HALL

I

o AR t}atI}JSI{C} ?) CA.::tG t'G.'t .
0 INFORMAL BAROQUE
MUSIC CONCERT v
-. Sunday Evening at 8 p.Um.
BACH--Brandenburg Concerto Number Four
Michael Avsharian, violin
Marianne Milks, recorder
Eric Van. der Schalie, recorder
MARAIS-Trio for Baroque flute, violin, and harpsichord
FUX--Sinfonia for 2 oboes, bassoon,and strings
BIBER-Two Sonatas for 7 strings and harpsichordf
Li St. Clarre's Episcopal ChurchI
AT 2309 PACKARD
(one light south of Stadium Boulevard) Tickets $1.75

PARTIC I PATE
IN STUDENT GOVERNMENT:
L.S.A. Student GovernmentI

I

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