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January 25, 1972 - Image 2

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1972-01-25

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Page Tw(.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Tuesdoy, January 25, 1972

PageTwcTHE ICHGAN AIL Tusddy Jauary25,197

Hotro
By HARRY HAMMITT
Commander Cody returned to
Hill Auditorium Sunday night
as part of his first national tour
to promote Cody's first album.
As most people know, Command-
er Cody and his Lost Planet Air-
men started their career in Ann
Arbor, but didn't start making it
big until they had moved out to
Berkeley. Since Cody is an ori-
ginal Ann Arbor product, he is
one of the most popular bands
in the area. Their popularity is
well deserved.
Sunday night's show was Cody
at his very best. The band has a
lot of ties of their own in Ann
Arbor, so they all like the chance
to get back. Their rapport with
the Ann Arbor audience is noth-
Ing short of phenomenal. From
the minute the band took the
stage, until long after they had
finished their second encore, the
band had complete control of
the audience.
As soon as the band had the
stage, they immediately went
into a short warm-up instru-
mental which was soon followed
by "Lost in the Ozone.' They
continued with quite a few of
the numbers from their first al-
bum, "20 Flight Rock," "What's
the Matter Now?", "Seeds and
Stems," "Family Bible," and
"Beat Me Daddy Eight to the
Bar." These songs, while all be-
ing good, were performed specif-
ically to alert the audience to
the material from the album.
About half-way through their
set, Cody stepped up to the mike
and introduced a few new num-
bers which featured back-up
vocals by guitarist Bill Kirchen
and bassist Buffalo Bruce on
the one hand, and guitarist John
Tichy and singer Billy C. on the
other. They did two. such num-

d Lincoln: A hometown smash

bers, one being the Coasters'
"The Shadow Knows," featuring
the golden sax of Andy Stein.
Soon after, Cody introduced the
next song by recalling the year
1955 and explaining that he
used to wear, a ducktail and,
pegged pants and was a real
pain in the ass to his father,
prompting him to say on more
than one occasion, "Son, you're
gonna drive me to drinkin', if
you don't stop drivin' that Hot
Rod Lincoln." This number, also
from their first album, has been
a staple of Cody's for quite some
time, and the audience went
wild.
As the set drew to a close, the
band played a number of rock
'n' roll numbers that should
sound about the same, but in the
hands of Cody, they never
sounded the slightest repetitious.
They ended their set with "Jail-
house Rock" which brought the
audience to their feet. As usual,
the crowd's appetite was far
from satiated, so Cody came out
for more. More rock 'n' roll and
they left a second time. But the
audience was so responsive that
they had to come back a third
time. This time they did Gene
Vincent's "Bebopa Lula" and
that was enough to satisfy the
audience.
The concert featured Cody at
his very best. The entire act was
flawless with outstanding inter-
play between the musicians.
Cody on piano and Bill Kirchen
on guitar really outdid. them-
selves with excellent playing
throughout. Stein was his nor-
mal outstanding self on both
fiddle and sax. Credit also has
to go to steel guitarist Bobby
Black who has the difficult job
of replacing the West Virginia
Creeper. One member who may

ihere's
thru
Classffed

TUESDAY, January 25
U.M. International Center

12:00 non

LUNCH"DISCUSSION

Subject: "Roadblocks to Development in. Haiti"
Speaker: CHRISTOPHER FRENCH, graduate student and C.O.
who did alternate service for 2 years in Haiti administering a
ruraFschodl run by a Baptist mission.
Cost 50c
FOR RESERVATIONS Sponsored by
CALL 662-5529 Etumenical Compus Center

I

Program Information 8-6416
TONIGHT
AT
7 and 9 P:M.
"AN ABSOLUTELY
STUNNING FILM!
A TOPNOTCH
THRILLER!"
N -JUDITH CAIN
.& NEW YORK MAGAZINE

I

Noon Luncheon - 35
Wed., Jan. 26
"THE TRAGEDY OF BANGLA DESH"
MUZAND HUQ and ROD HUBER
Representatives from Committee on
Bangl a Desh Refugee Relief Fund
GUILD HOUSE-802 Menroe

I

I

-Daily-Robert Wargo

Chase the
Inna~nrv RBliaae wv.

Commander Cody

be overlooked in praising the
group is drummer Lance Dicker-
son. Well, he shouldn't be over-
looked. Dickerson is a very in-
telligent and competent drum-
mer. He is the backbone of the
group and without him the
group is just rnot complete. Billy
C. was particularly up for the
show and turned in a good per-
formance, smashing his guitar
and knocking over mike-stands
along the way.
Buddies in the Saddle, and the
Boogie Brothers were the sup-
porting acts and they played

competently enough, but were
nothing as compared to Cody.
The harmonica-player in the
Boogie Brothers should be rec-
ognized for his excellent blues
harmonica.
The concert was one of the

most satisfying concerts for a
long time. When the Ann Arbor
audience and Cody get things
together, a -fantastic show can
be expected. Sunday night was
no exception; Cody was at his
best, and that is awful good.

JOIN US
for the
Grad Coffee Hour
Wed., Jan 26
4-6 PM..
4th Floor Rarkheni

ajy

IliI

i

I

Hot chocolate and cake
for all.

o

6

cinema

i

Unman'
By RICHARD GLATZER
Unman, Wittering, and Zigo
is ostensibly a movie thriller, ul-
timately a disappointing one, yet
I think those tiny words on the
bottom of the ads, "Based on
the play by Giles Cooper,"
should not be overlooked when
parcelling out the blame. Stage
thrillers, so confined spatially,
are usually caged dynamos, long
periods of waiting for those fi-
nal climaxes that are intended
to explain and redeem the en-
tire play but that seldom do.
And though Unman, Wittering,
and Zigo's camerawork is per-
fectly competent, its scenery
beautiful, and its acting cine-
matic, the film, so slow in build-
ing toward its single climax, so
totally lacking in plot action, is
a thriller for the stage.
It begins promisingly enough
with Pelham, a professor at the
Chantry school for boys, mys-
teriously falling to his death at
the foot of steep cliffs near the
school. John Ebony (David
Hemmings) arrives to replace
Pelham, only to be informed by
one of the students on his first
day of class that his predecessor
was murdered by the boys after
having attempted to punish
their disobedience with deten-
tions. Ebony, however, once con-
vinced this is true, sets about to
find the ringleader - someone
controlling the boys via terror
tactics.
Tuesday and Wednesday
CHARLIE
CHAPLI N
SHORT
COMEDIES
Made Between 1912 and
1921 During the Greatest
Era of Silent Comedy.
See Chaplin's Immortal
Tramp Character Dance
through Life.
TWO FULL SHOWS AT
7:00 and 9:00 p.m.
ARCHITECTURE
AUDITORIUM
75cI

A bad stage killer

And here's where the film be-
comes static, for while we're
waiting for something to hap-
pen, for the boys finally to get
down to business, and for Ebony
to discover whatever there is to
be learned, U, W, and Z (the
title is three names of Ebony's
students) tries to satisfy us with
Ebony's social and marital prob-
lems and a number of false
alarms. All of which exasperat-
ingly whets our appetites for the
excitement we hope will even-
tually come.
That action does come, it is
exciting, and it lasts for perhaps.
seven minutes. Then, impossible
though it may seem, it's time to.
discover who planned Pelham's
death and await the final cred-
its. This denouement is totally
implausible and unwelcome
(who wants the action to end
when it's just begun?), and
merely obscures the issues when

what we've been waiting for is
enlightenment.
The end? Not yet. Just before
the final credits roll on the
screen, Hemmings thoughtfully
wonders aloud, "What made
them do it?" If that's an admis-
sion of not having answered the
one question the movie raises,
at least they're being honest
with us. But if, as is more like-
ly, it's trying to tell us that what
we've just seen is actually A
comment on the English school
system that has produced these
young murderers, Hemming's
query has only coinpounded U,
W, & Z's failure. Adding one
line does not change a thriller
to Plato's Republic; it only
makes the film that much more
disappointing.

It U
CLIP AND SAVE
/ t
It [
[ 1
t
/ X
te
980 1
SMUSIC FOR EVERYONEf
t U
t ,
INTGRODUNGCINGUL
Ia
Is
t /
t [/
* U
9-11 Classical 9-11, orning Show
ta
^ '!I,"

4~

I

ENDS
TONIGHT!
Shows
7 " 9
The Murder
that shocked the
The Trial that still shak

"ONE OF THE YEAR'S BEST !"
-BELLA ABZUG-SHIRLEY CHISHOLM
-TOM O'HORGAN-JOHN SIMON
The
SACCO &.VANZETTI
Murder Case
"TRIUMPHANT! IT WILL FASCINATE YOU!"
rs -Judith Crist, NEW YORK MAGAZINE
Nation.
Les the World.

SL-L BdroadWay

OO'IF'TH Po UM
FIfTH AVENUE AT LUBERTY
Ill-I DOWNTOWN ANN ARBOR
LJLJ INFORMATION 761-9700

STARTS WEDNESDAY!

"ONE OF THE YEAR'S 10 BEST !"
-Archer Winsten, N.Y. Post-Pete Hamill, N.Y. Post
-Bob Salmaggi, WINS Radio
-Francis Taylor, L.I. Press
RCYES ECIAL INTERFILM JURY ATLANTA PHOENIX GOLDEN DOVE
FILM GRAND WORLD COUNCIL FILM "BEST OF "PEACE PRIZE"
FESTIVAL PRIZE OF CHURCHES FESTIVAL FESTIVAL"
AWARD PIEAWARDS FETVL
ONE OF THE GREAT FILMS OF OUR TIME!
A TRUE GIANT UNFORGETTABLE THE ACTING IS EXTRAORDINARY
-ABC-TV -CATHOLIC FILM NEWSLETTER -NY. DAILY NEWS

2-4 Rock and Blues
4-6 Blues and Janz
6-1 Reporters Round
Table
7-8 Black Edition
8-1 1 Rhythm and Blues
11-3 Progressive, Rock

I1-4 KOCK
4-1 Folk
7-8 Community
Services

8-11 Rhythm and Blues
11-3 Progressive Rock

Fri

Saturdy

I
i
t
M
"
3
"
1
t
I
1
1

f

9-1

1

Morning Show

9-5 Rock

11-4 Rock
4-6 Folk.

5-6 New Release

6-8 Rock

6-8 Live Folk 8-11 Rhythm and Blues
8-11 Rhythm and Blues 11-3 Oldies Show
11-3 Progressive Rock
I.I

I 7<> J I '2~

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