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April 15, 1979 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1979-04-15

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Infact thanks dorm residents and the
university community for supporting the
Nestle boycott.

Page 2-Sunday, April 15, 1979-The Michigan Daily

le"go

ooting celebration in Uganda

Further protest unethical formula'
promotion by writing NESTLE:
100 Bloomingdale Rd.
White Plains, NY 10605

Infact, A2

604 E. Huron

663-1870

Representatives of UNITED TELEPHONE COMPANY
of Ohio will be recruiting in Ann Arbor on Thursday,
April 19. We are interested in interviewing present
college graduates or June graduates with the follow-
ing degrees:
1. Bachelors or Masters Degree in Electrical
Engineering.
2. Bachelors or Masters Degree in Business Admin-
istration or Industrial Engineering.
3. Masters Degree in Business Administration with
a strong background in Finance, Statistics, Market-
ing or Accounting and a Bachelors Degree in
Accounting.
Call the Personnel Office collect at (513) 498-5174 or (513)
498-5118 prior to Monday, April 16 to schedule an inter-
view.

KAMPALA, Uganda (AP) - Rotting
corpses and secret papers littered the
grounds of Idi Amin's terror chambers
yesterday as victorious soldiers helped
Kampala residents loot shops and raid
state warehouses.
Meanwhile, Amin continued to elude
pursuing Tanzanian and Ugandan exile
troops.
INSIDE THE State Research
Bureau, where Amin held together his
brutal eight-year reign with torture and
murder, invaders found the rotting
bodies of prisoners shot this week by
Amin's fleeing security agents.
The contents of secret files - records
of forced confessions and lists of infor-

mers to be paid off - fluttered across
the parking lot of the three-story, pink
stucco building that stands among
flowering trees, stately buildings, and
tranquil streets on Nakasero Hill.
Amin's lodge is next door.
Hussein Mayambala, a 30-year-old
technician, was one of the few who sur-
vived a stay in the Research Bureau's
basement cells.
"I WAS taken in August 1976 and ac-
cused of plotting against Amin," he
said. "They were right, but they never
could make me talk."
"I spent two months seven feet un-
derground in a cell without light or
toilet. I was tied up and fed a piece of

potato and a half glass of water every
day.
"They forced me to sit naked on the
neck of an upright bottle while they
questioned me, and they put pins under
my fingernails.
"KILLING THOSE people now would
be like being invited for a cup of coffee.
It would be nothing," he said.
A municipal employee at Entebbe
said, "We all kept quiet to live. You
made a little noise and you were gone.
You behave like a stupid fool and you
were all right."
By some accounts as many as 300,000
Ugandans were killed by Amin's men in
eight years.
AT HIS official residence in Entebbe,
21 miles from Kampala on the shores of
Lake Victoria, provisional President

Yussufu Lule met with his Cabinet and
told reporters gathered on the lawn that
law and order was largely restored.
But there were unconfirmed reports
in Nairobi, Kenya, of widespread
violence beyond areas held by the Tan-
zanian and exile troops.
Refugees, reaching Kenya, mainly
Moslems and Sudanese who were
favored under the Amin regime, repor-
ted vigilantes had set up roadblocks in-
side Uganda.
Lule, sworn in Friday, said a court
system would begin operating in a
week. One of the first trials may be that
,of Amin. Tanzanian and Ugandan
troops pushed north and east of tile
capital Saturday looking for the fleeing
tyrant. They met little resistance from
,Amin's few remaining men.

I ___ ___

m

FOR LEOTARDS
at SPECIAL PRICES come to
ERIC'S SECOND SERVE
Factory Outlet for Discount Sports Apparel.
Name Brands, Overruns and Seconds
Long-Sleeve Leotards $6.80/Short-Sleeve $6.30

U

I

Some Exec.
function with
(Continued from Page 1)
tion of the students, and this is a way
for students to get input into policy
making at the University.
LSA Dean Billy Frye agreed, and
said there is no possibility of a student
serving on theExecutive Committee of
the LSA cotlege.
"THE COMMITTEE is very opposed

I

Tights $3.70/ Any Top and Bottom $9.25
406 E. Liberty 2 Blks. off State St. 663

-6771

-P

..riles..- ----".. ..,
--

- - --- -

----
77777777/

jJ
t /I/ ull
OWN
ti
_, o
UAL-

.,

Committees
student iMput
to student membership," he said,
"Students don't have the expertisq
which would lead to good judgment on
the variety of issues we discuss-per;
sonnel decisions, promotions, hiringi
and so forth."
However, Robert Pestronk, a
graduate student in the School of Public
health and one of the two student memj
bers of the eight-member Executive
Committee, said he thinks students
should be placed on the LSA Executive
Committee.
"I don't see why not. Some student
are capable of discussing and underj
standing all these issues," he said.
"Faculty members certainly don't
have a monopoly on intelligence oz
opinion."
"ALTHOUGH NOT every student card
understand all the issues, not ever;
faculty member can either," he added;
"To discriminate against students foal
this reason is unfair."
The School of Public Health's
Executive Committee has closed ani
open sessions, both of which allow
student member input. However;
students are only allowed to vote in the
open meetings, and are restricted t4
discussion of the issue in question.
"In both cases, the student point of
view is asked-for and considered," said
Pestronk.
BRUCE KOZARSKY, LSA Student
Government (LSA-SG) representative;
said LSA-SG has long been in favor of a'
student member on the LSA Executive
Committee and said it would make the
decision-making process of the Univerj
sity more democratic.
"It's a great idea, because it's very
important for students to have an ac
tive voice in matters affecting them,'
he said. "I would even advocte a
change in the Regents' bylaws so that
students' votes would count."
"The biggest problem now is that
Executive Committee decisions are.
closed and it's very important for us to
have input and be aware of the
decisions," he added.
Frye agreed that some students may
be qualified to serve on the Executive
Committee, but said other things must
be considered.
THE MICHIGAN DAILY
(USPS 341-900)
Volume LXXXIX, No. 157 -
Sunday, April 15, 1979
is edited and managed by students a
the University of Michigan. Published
daily Tuesday through Sunday morns
ings during the University year at 420
Maynard Street, Ann Arbor,. Michigan
48109. Subscription rates: $12 Septem
ber through April (2 semesters); 13 by
mail outside Ann Arbor. Summer ses'
sion published Tuesday through Satur-
day mornings. Subscription rates;
$6.50 in Ann Arbor; $7.00 by mail out-
side Ann Arbor. Second class postage
padat Ann Arbor, Michigan. POST-~
MASTER:nSend address changes t
THE MICHIGAN DAILY, 420 Maynar
Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109.

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R ITTER
CRANDALL
DAVIDSON
HAGIWARA

Princ. of Money, Bankg & Fin. Mkts. 2nd

LEHNINGER

Biochemistry

2nd

Intro. to Mechanics of Solids
Fundamentals of Accounting
Theme et Variations

3rd - SMITH

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Economics
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5th
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1

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AND ITS AFTERMATH

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