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April 14, 1979 - Image 20

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1979-04-14
Note:
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The Michigan Daily-Saturday

Page 8-Saturday, April 14, 1979-The Michigan Daily

From Stonehenge to the

Iron Curtain: Prepare in advi
And, of course, ternational Center, in back of the
but with careful Michigan Union. At the International
have to spend Center, there are people who know

London, Paris, Dublin,

Madrid,.

Rome, Vienna, Munich, War-
saw-Europe. Making the decision to
spend a summer across the Atlantic
Ocean"is easy. Who could resist the-
temptation to bum through the Con-

tinent, letting yourself float with the
wind? The key to a first-rate
European vacation is turned before
-you ever board the airplane. You'll

when you get there..
you'll need money,l
planning you won't
megabucks. There's
sultant in our own b
-doesn't charge comn

need a passport, places to
will need to know what

stay, and
to expect

a travel con-
5ackyard, and it
nission-the In-

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Deciding what to pack can be
the most important decision you'll
make for your excursion abroad.
Any experienced traveler will tell
you to only bring the essentials.
Leave your impressive duds at
home and save them for the
States.
Your next hardest decision is
deciding what's totally necessary.
But, first you'll have to obtain
some lightweight luggage. You
don't want to schlep heavy bags
everywhere you go. Find the
lightest, sturdiest model and grab
it. Then sit down and make a short
list of what to take.
Jeans and a sweater are Ab-
solutely necessary. Of course,
your list must include a few

changes of undies and socks. And
for all the walking you'll be doing,
a sturdy, comfortable pair of
shoes is another must.
For cooler weather, a jacket
and a change of t-shirts will come
in handy, too. You might want to
pack a lightweight, dressy outfit
for those occasional formal
evenings.
Also highly recommended-are a
bar of soap, washcloth, laundry
bags, a sleeping bag, umbrella,
needle and thread, and a camera.
Add to or subtract from the list
according to your needs, but be
sure to select durable clothes.
With the imagination, you can
have a nifty wardrobe and a light
load to carry.
The
V whil
cards
fanc
twoin
$8-$1r
hoste
V at in
tatioi
tress
tainn
Carr,
lost,
trav(
dolla
andt
tern
chec
V your
feren
Expr
will I
used
chec
sona
reco
over
Co
nn moni
$260
$1,20
Total

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Forms and regulations-the
international red tape is easier
to cut through if you start early.
You'll need a passport, and
possibly visas, an International
Student I.D. card.
PASSPORT
Passport applications are
available at the International
Center. You'll need official
photographs of yourself. Pic-
tures cost roughly $6 at a local
studio or at the University
Photo Services in room 542 LSA
Building. You'll also need proof
of U.S. citizenship-a previous
U.S. passport, naturalization
papers, or a copy of your birth
certificate, identification such
as a driver's license, a $10
check or money order made out
to U.S. Passport Office, and $4
for local processing. Then, take
this collection to the County
Clerk's office or the Main Post
Office. It'll be two to four weeks
before you'll get the passport.

VISAS
If you're planning to
only Western Europe fo
than three- months, ski
section. If you're staying1
than three months, or p
cross the Iron Curtain, bi
to apply for a visa. Befo
leave, you must conta
consulate or embassy
country you plan to visi
visa application. It is fas
apply in person, so if you
to travel in more than one

how to plan a European vacation.
Here are some tips from the people at
the International Center:
try that requires a visa, get the
U visit first one before starting your
r less trip. The others can be obtained
p this overseas.
longer
alan to INTERNATIONAL I.D. CARD
ie sure The International Student
re you I.D. Card is your second most
ct the important piece of red tape,
of the besides a passport. This card
t for a entitles you to discounts and
test to benefits. For $3, get it from the
u want International Center in one
e coun- day.

I

Daily photos by Maureen O'Malley|

most enticing aspect of traveling through Europe
e you're still in college is the price. With discount
s, youth hostel cards, and a willingness to avoid
y hotels and restaurants, Europe can be travelled in
months for around $2,000. At the least, plan to spend
0 a day, camping, hitchhiking, and staying in youth
els. For $15-$20, you can stay in student hostels, eat
expensive restaurants, and use public transpor-
n. For the elite, $25-$30 a day will get you soft mat-
es in nice hotels, better restaurants, and enter-
ment. But in any case, take a $100 emergency fund.
y only a small amount of cash, because once it's
it's lost for good. Take Karl Malden's advice, carry
eler's checks. Ann Arbor banks sell them in U.S.
irs, Swiss francs, English pounds, German marks,
Canadian dollars, for a one per cent charge. The In-
ational Center recommends purchasing traveler's
ks in U.S. dollars, unless you're spending most of
time in a single country. Although it makes no dif-
nce which brand of checks you choose, American
ress is the most popular, because its many offices
hold mail for customers. Some credit cards can be
world-wide, and some permit you to cash personal
ks, or obtain $50 cash at the overseas offices. Per-
l checks, cashier's checks, and money orders aren't
immended, unless you plan to open a bank account
seas.
st breakdowns for the cheapest way to go for two
ths: $350, standby air fare; $600, living expenses;
land transportation. Average/high: $500, air fare;
00, living expenses; $390, land transportation.,
ls: $1,210 for the thrifty, $2,090 for the big spenders.

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Again, consider your monetary sup-
ply. Hotels can cost a bundle, so you
may want to consider the following
alternatives:
STUDENT HOSTELS
Usually located in big cities and
university towns, student hostels offer
inexpensive lodging for young people.
Prices range from $5-$15 in Northern
Europe to $2.50-$5 in-Southern Europe.
While the price includes breakfast,
other meals also may be available.
These hostels provide bed linens and
showers. Student hostels are often
dormitory rooms, or converted flats or
hotels. There are one-to-four persons in
one room. Student hostels are listed in
a booklet of the same name, for which
you'll fork over $1. The hostels are

jammed during tl
good idea to call ft
YOUTH
In comparison
youth hostels ar
rural- and metro
can be quite inexl
ten, you get v
Youth hostels
but without coe
ages generally ra
rules, in accord
chaic setting, ma
be in by 10:00 p.n
usually included,
are occasionall
hostels also do not
so be prepared.
To stay in a yo
buy an $11 Youth

f

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V

REQUIRED
( ) Passport
( ) Visas-permission to enter a country.
U.S. citizens staying in Western Europe
usually don't need one
( ) Vaccinations-required only for Asian,
African, and Latin American countries
( ) Money-cash, travelers checks, credit
cards

STRONGLY RECOMMENDED
( ) International Student Identity Card-
to be elibile for discounts and benefits
( ) Insurance
( ) Guidebooks
( ) Background reading-learn something
about the country you plan to visit
( ) Language
CONSIDER
( ) International Youth Hostel Card-to be
eligible for low-cost accommodations
( ) Railpass
( ) International Driver's License
( ) Hotel reservations

( ) Arrangements for on-go
tation
( ) Health precautions-presc
cinations, medicine
( ) Arrangements for mail
TIME NEEDED
Passport: 2-4 weeks (or longe
through July)
International Student I.D. and
pass'es: 24 hours
Charters: Approximately 1-45
departure .
Railpasses: 3-10 days after re
port

(

) Luggage-Two checked bags totaling no
more than 106 inches in length, width,
and girth

i
i

-. .

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