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April 14, 1979 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1979-04-14

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Page 2-Saturday, April 14, 1979-The Michigan Daily

T3 a T 1 C

Church Worship Services

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FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
1432 Washtenaw Ave.-662-4466
William M. Ferry
Carl R. Geider
Graham M. Patterson
Services of Worship:
Sunday 9:30 and 11:00 a.m.
Coffee hour at 12 noon.
Student Fellowship meets at 4:00
P.m.
Tuesday at 7:30 p.m.--Campus Bible
Study in the French room.
FULL GOSPEL HOLY GHOST
BELIEVING MINISTRY
at THE SALVATION ARMY CHAPEL
9 S. Park Street
Ypsilanti, Michigan
482-4700f
Sunday Worship-1:30 to 3:30 p.m.
Wednesday Worship-7:00 to 9:00
p.m.
Acts 2:39, 1iCor. 12.
Note: We will only be at the Salva-
tion Army Chapel until April 18, New
location unknown as of yet.
CANTERBURY LOFT
Episcopal Campus Ministry
332 Sc th State St.
Rev=Andrew Foster, Chaplain
SUNDAY COMMUNITY EVENTS: 1
11:00 a.m.-Bruch and Social Hour.
12:00 noon-Celebration of the Holy
Eucharist.
Canterbury Loft serves Episcopal-
ians at the University of M ichigan and
sponsors --rograms in the arts which
have ethical or spiritual themes.
* * *
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
Serving the Campus for LCIS
Robert Kavasch. Interim Pastor
1511 Washtenaw Ave.
663-5560 and 668-8720
Double Sunday Services-9:15 a.m.
and 10:30 a.m.
Sunday Bible Study at 9:15 a.m.
Midweek Worship-Wednesday at
10:00 p.m.
Midweek Bible Study-Thursday at
7:30 p.m.

LORD OF LIGHT LUTHERAN
CHURCH
(The Campus Ministry of the ALC-LCA)
Gordon Ward, Pastor
801 S. Forest at Hill St.
9:30 a.m.-Easter Breakfast.
11:00 a.m.-Worship Service.
Monday, April 16:
7:30 p.m.-Lifestyle Assessment
Group-at the Wesley Foundation
(corner of State & Huron). To examine
our lifestyles in light of the world
hunger/ecology/justice situation. ,
Tuesday, April 17:
7:30 p.m.-Lifestyle Assessment
Group-at Lord of Light.
Wednesday, April 18:
8:30 p.m.-Bible Study; a study of the
history and theology of the Old
Testament; led by Gary Herion, a
doctoral student in Old Testament
studies.
WESLEY FOUNDATION
UNITED METHODIST
CAMPUS MINISTRY
602 E. Huron at State, 668-6881
Rev. W. Thomas Schomaker, Chaplain
Lynette Bracy, Mike Pennanen,
Shirley Polakowski
Meet at Wesley at 6:00 a.m. for ride
to the Sunrise Service.
* * *
AMERICAN BAPTIST CAMPUS
CENTER at FIRST BAPTIST
CHURCH
512 E. Huron St.-663-9376
Jitsuo Morikawa, Minister
A. Theodore Kachel, Campus Minister
Worship-10 a.m.-"The Resurrec-
tion Power"-Mr. Morikawa.
11 a.m.-College Bible Study-
"Women in the Bible."
UNIVERSITY CHURCH OF
THE NAZARENE
409 S. Division
Steve Bringardner, Pastor
Church School-9:45 a.m.
Service of Worship-11:00 a.m.
Time of Meeting-6:00 p.m.

ST. MARY STUDENT CHAPEL
(Catholic)
331 Thompson-663-0557
Weekly Masses:
Daily-Mon.-Fri. 5:10 p.m.
Saturday-7:00 p.m.,
Sunday-7:45 a.m., 9 a.m., 10:30
a.m., noon,and5p.m.
North Campus Mass-9:30 a.m. at
Bursley Hall, West Cafeteria.
Divorced Catholic Meeting Friday at
7:30 p.m.
Right of Reconciliation-4 p.m.-5
p.m. on Friday only; any other time
by appointment.
CHURCH OF CHRIST
530 W. Stadium
(Across from Pioneer High)
Schedule of Services:
Sunday-Bible School-9:30 a.m.
Worship-10:30 a.m. and 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday-Bible Study-7:30 p.m.
Koinonia
(A Bible Study for college students)
For information call 662-2756
Wilburn C. Hill and Larry Phillips,
Evangelists
Transportation: 662-9928
* * *
EMMANUEL BAPTIST CHURCH
2535 Russell Street
Sunday School-10 a.m.
Morning Worship-11a.m.
Thursday Bible Study and Prayer-
7:00 p.m.
Sunday Evening Service, 727 Miller,
Community Room-6:00 p.m.
For spiritual help or a ride to our
services please feel free to call Pastor
Leonard Sheldon, 761-0580.
Affiliated with G.A.R.B.C.
CAMPUS CHAPEL
(One Block North of S. University and
Forest)
1236 Washtenaw Ct.
Rev. Don Postema, Pastor
10:00 a.m.-Easter Sunday Celebra-
tion.
6:00 p.m.-Service of Holy Com-
munion.
* * *
FIRST UNITED METHODIST
CHURCH
120 S. State St.
(Corner of State and Huron)
Worship Schedule:
8:30 a.m.-Holy Communion in the
Chapel.
9:30 and 11:00 a.m.-Morning Wor-
ship in the Sanctuary.
Church School for All Ages-9:30
a.m. and 11 a.m.
Choir Rehearsal Thursday-7:15
p.m.
Ministers:
Dr. Donald B. Strobe
Rev. Fred B. Maitland
Dr. Gerald R. Parker
Education Director: Rose McLean
Intern: Carol Bennington
STUDENTS
Join us for Sunday School and Worship
PACKARD ROAD BAPTIST CHURCH
Packard & Stone School Road
Sunday School-9:45 a.m.
Worship-11:00 a.m.
For transportation-call 662-6253

Alternate
Honors plan,
offered
in English
By ALISON HERSCHEL
If Chaucer, Milton, and Dickens are
your cup of tea, but you feel constrained
by the University's structured,
traditional English Honors Program,
the new, alternative concentration plan
may be just the solution to your un-
dergraduate dilemma.
Beginning this fall, qualified English
students will be allowed to develop their
own honors concentration programs,
due to a recent decision by the English
Department faculty.
STUDENTS IN the traditional
Honors Program must take seven
required courses during their junior
and senior years, submit a honors
thesis and pass two three hour written
comprehensive exams. In the new
program, the brainstorm of English
Professor Steven Lavine, students may
pursue a non-honors concentration,
take 33 credit hours in English, turn in a
senior thesis, and then undergo a one-
hour oral exam in defense of their
thesis.
The alternate plan allows students to
concentrate on their particular area of
interest in literature and does not
restrict them to a pre-arranged
schedule.
Members of the English faculty of-
fered several reasons for their decision
to create an alternative to the present
Honors Program. Prof. James McIn-
tosh said, "We had the sense that some
students felt a little constricted in the
regular program. Several of us liked
the idea that they could plan their own
major."
ALTHOUGH ENGLISH. Department
members voted unanimously to accept
the proposal, not all the professors are
equally enthusiastic. "I don't have any
particular objection to it," Prof. Bert
Hornback asserted, "but in my cynical
old age, I'm not so enthusiastic for
change for change's sake." -
Hornback and others are concerned
that some of the students opting for an
alternative concentration plan might
not get as strong a background in
English as they would in the regular
program. "It'll work for those kids who
want to make themselves a serious
education," Hornback said, citing a
heavy reading load and lack of struc-
ture as possible difficulties.
Professor John Reidy, head of the
traditional Honors English program
agreed with Hornback that there must
be careful supervision of students who
choose their own program. Reidy
characterized the kind of student who
would be eligible for this program as "a
rare bird" and stressed that these
students must have a good idea of their
interests and expected course of study
when they agree to the alternate
program.
Students will be required to submit a
500 word statement of intent and a ten-
tative list of proposed courses when
they apply to the program. In addition,
according to McIntosh, students must
prepare a 500-word statement in the
spring of their senior year explaining
what education has meant to them and
what they have learned.

0

arrested
By KEVIN ROSEBOROUGH
Five persons arrested during a
confrontation between Ann Arbor
police and a crowd of "about 70" at
State and William Thursday after-
noon were released without being
charged for any crimes hours after
their arrests.
The incident, which reportedly
began shortly before 5 p.m. in front
of the Focus pinball parlor, involved
a predominately black crowd and
several police officers.
WITNESSES SAID problems
began when the officers attempted
to disperse the crowd on the corner
across from the Diag. When the
crowd didn't break up, the officers
began making arrests for loitering,
hindering, and opposing a police of-
ficer.
"They just went up to persons and
said that they were under arrest,"
said Jeff Franklin, 17. "People
stayed on the corner - they didn't
like it." Several witnesses claimed
to see officers being excessively
rough.
"They just waded into the crowd
and used unnecessary force," said
Stacy Stinson, a student at
Washtenaw County Community
College. "They harassed the crowd
to a point of fighting back."
Several persons said they saw one
officer, identified only as Officer
Wise, jab 15-year-old Arletta James

A2 police release 5

yesterday
in the stomach with a stick, either a
billyclub or flashlight. James was
one of those arrested. "The cop was
holding her, she wasn't moving, and
the cop jabbed her with his night-
stick," said LSA junior Julie
Greene.
AT LEAST five persons filed
citizen's complaints over the in-
cident at City Hall. Jim Wallace, a
Literary College sophomore, said he
filed assault and battery charges
against the officer.
"It didn't seem right to me that he
should do that," said Wallace. "I
went and asked him his badge num-
ber, and he lied to me. I asked him
about it again and he pushed me and
said 'It's none of your f-----g
business!'
Police Captain Robert Conn, who
was the duty commander at the time
of the incident, said the use of some
force in the incident had to be expec-
ted. "People were milling around
and an officer trying to make an
arrest was being pushed around.
When that happens, the other of-
ficers don't go in there with the idea
'Will you please move?' "
Conn said allegations of un-
necessary force would be in-
vestigated. "We've had numerous
problems and complaints in the past
in nice weather about that corner.
There are ordinances requiring no
loitering and they emust be enfor-
ced."

I
Prof's experiences
and objectives reflect
transition in Africa

Nicaragua: September
COLOR FILM DOCUMENTARY of the Nicaraguan
insurgent movement of September 1978 in the strug-
gle of the people to throw off the Somoza dynasty.
"With rifle in hand, full of faith and love
for my Nicaraguan people, I wil/fight to the
end for the coming of the reign ofjustice.'
GASPA R GARCIA LA VIA NNA
Sacred Heart Priest
Friday, April 20-7:30 p.m.
A ngell Hall fud. B
Office of Ethics and Religion, in coop. with Group on Latin
American Issues, Human Rights Committee and Urgent Action
Group.

- (Continued from Page 1)
defeat in 1970 left him in a precarious
position in Africa.
Uzoigwe says he is "quite happy"
with the progress of his one-professor
department at the University, though
he criticizes the University's lack of ac-
tive encouragement and appreciation.
"We're the youngest (history)
programs competing against
established programs, and we've been
left to fend for ourselves," Uzoigwe
says.
NEVERTHELESS, Uzoigwe proudly
cites the program's achievements. His
undergraduate courses on 19th and 20th
century Africa attract approximately
40 students each, while the graduated
program in African history has turned
out five Ph.Ds and currently includes
eight graduate students. African collec-
tions at University libraries have been
steadily improving, Uzoigwe points out.
And since 1970, Uzoigwe hasacoor-
dinated a weekly colloquium featuring
various speakers on Africa.
Uzoigwe concludes, however, "We
have achieved great things here, but no
one seems to care-we haven't received
the recognition we deserve. I do wish a
lot more understanding and support
would be given to African and Afro-
American studies in the University."
UZOIGWE'S CRUSADE against "the
lots of nonsense written about Africa,.
especially by people who don't know"
takes him all over the country. He has
spoken at civic clubs, black
organizations, dozens of universities,
and even Jackson State Prison. He sees
the "duty" of African scholars such as
himself to represent Africa in what we
think is the correct light."
The dominant theme in Uzoigwe's
rigorous historical approach is his
stress on "balance." "I don't glorify,
Africa," he asserts, but there is always
"an element of sympathy based on un-
derstanding whether in criticism or
praise."
Uzoigwe considers his claim to a
balanced approach as justifiable both
by his European and African
backgrounds. His first-hand experience
with European colonialism is demon-
strated by his first name, Godfrey.
Uzoigwe says he was named after a
British district commissioner who
frequently visited Uzoigwe's grandf-
ther. The British had randomly picked
Uzoigwe's grandfather to be the local
chief.

I

nobody
He was in his twenties.
So was she.
Both were Catholic, unmarried,
prayerful, creative.
Both cared about people
and cared for them.
How come he never thought
of the priesthood?
How come she never thought
of being a nun?

Representatives of UNITED TELEPHONE COMPANY
of Ohio will be recruiting in Ann Arbor on Thursday,
April 19. We are interested in interviewing present
college graduates or June graduates with the follow-
ing degrees:
1. Bachelors or Masters Degree in Electrical
Engineering.
2. Bachelors or Masters Degree in Business Admin-
istration or Industrial Engineering.
3. Masters Degree in Business Administration with
a strong background in Finance, Statistics, Market-
ing or Accounting and a Bachelors Degree in
Accounting.
Call the Personnel Office collect at (513) 498-5174 or (513)
498-5118 prior to Monday, April 16 to schedule an inter-
view.

UGOIZWE IS A member of the
African generation for which education
was -synonimous with Western
education. Uzoigwe first attended
strict, Western boarding school at age
ten.
Uzoigwe spent eight years attending
the graduate schools at the University
of Dublin, and Trinity College, also in
Ireland. Eventually he received a doc-
torate in philosophy from the school of
Modern History at Oxford University.
While Uzoigwe studied European
politics, literature, and history, he says
everything he learned about Africa, he
learned on his own.
Uzoigwe describes the European em-
phasis of the Western-educated elite of
his generation at the time: "Every
chap who believed himself intelligent
wanted to be a classical scholar."
WHEN UZOIGWE was asked to teach
African history at the University of
Makerere, he was reluctant because, he
says, with his European history orien-
tation; he "did not feel qualified." It
was upon accepting the lectureship in
African history that Uzoigwe says "My
study of Africa began in earnest."
Uzoigwe joined others of this
Western-educated African elite in
making political activities geared to
African independence an underlying
part of their educational experience.
Uzoigwe founded a magazine, "Fer-
ment,"while in Dublin and was a;
member of the London-based West
African Students Union (WASU).-
Through these and similar newsletters
and organizations, Uzoigwe says these
African students "spoke out on every'
issue of important.
"We dreamed great dreams of what
Africa would be like when the
Europeans are gone." However, he
says, the emphasis was not
nationalistic but a "we-are-all-
Africans" one. Uzoigwe also
established a Pan-African Society in
Dublin in response to the killing of more
than a hundred South African blacks by
the 'south African police during the:
Sharpsville riots of 1960. One goal of the
Society was to persuade shopkeepers tot
boycott South African products.
WHILE UZOIGWE has been direc-
ting his energies toward building
African studies at the University, he4
has not forgotten Africa, nor has Africa:
forgotten him.
Elected honorary chief by the people
of his native eastern Nigerian village,
Uzoigwe has reciprocated by helping to
get two schtools built in the village,
through his contacts in the Nigerian:
Ministry of Education.
He recently accepted the postion of
national patron in the ;nited States for
a Nigerian political party, now that the
Nigerian military regime has stated its
intentione to return the country to a
civilian government. But Uzoigwe
asserts "basically I'm not a politician. I
just don't have the bug to run as a
politician."
THE MICHIGAN DAILY
(UISPS 3At4-900)
Volume LXXXIX, No. 156
Saturday, April 14, 1979
is Jd..,J ......J 1 Io"A -

"No one ever asked me'
they said.
Is this your story?
No one ever asked you?
Well, we're asking.
- Mail Coupon Today!----------------

"WHY DO THE HEATHEN RAGE?"
Psalms 2:1 and Acts 4:25

Sex perversions, rampant all around in our day, excused
by many instead of being fought to the death, make a mock
of God's Law and Commandments for the protection and
purity of the family life. To the first man, created in His own
image, God said: "THEREFORE SHALL A MAN LEAVE HIS
FATHER AND MOTHER AND CLEAVE UNTO HIS WIFE,
AND THEY SHALL BE ONE FLESH." What God hath joined
together, let not man put asunder. Thou shalt not commit
adultery, and he that looketh on a woman to lust after her,
hath committed adultery in his heart-and Christ advised
plucking out the eye rather than taking the risk of having the
whole body cast into hell fire!
In the 16th chapter of Luke Christ draws back the curtain
hiding the unseen and tells of a man who died, was buried,

perfect obedience to them in our place; secondarily, by the
work of God's Holy Spirit writing them in the new heart,
God's gift to the believer. And so we find right at the close of
the Bible, Revelation 22:14:"BLESSED ARE THEY THAT DO
HIS COMMANDMENTS, THAT THEY MAY HAVE A RIGHT
TO THE TREE OF LIFE, AND ENTER IN THROUGH THE
GATES INTO THE CITY." If you don't have a right to the tree
of life, and can't enter in through the gates into the city, you
are still in your sins, a lost soul! Repent! Repent! Repent!
Do you mock and score at the revelations of God's Word
concerning eternal judgment and hell fire? Well, so did Lot's
sons-in-law, friends, and the people of Sodom, and next
morning early they were consumed! Doubtless scorners and
mockers will agree with us in one point, that is they are on the
way to their grave, and will die, even though they reject the

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