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April 10, 1979 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1979-04-10

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

IFYOU SEE NPS AKOPEN CALL ZDNL
More jazz
The University's Jazz Band, under the guiding hand of band
member and economics major Jon Diamond, managedto raise $18,000
since spring break to send the band to the annual Montreux Jazz
Festival in Switzerland this July. Bands participate in the festival by
invitation only, and last year only two U.S. college bands -- Ohio State
University and the University of Kansas - received invitations. The
hitch to the.prestigious festival is that the college bands must pay for
the trips themselves. Diamond started to knock on doors in January,
asking for money, but by March 2, he had collected only $3,000. But
thanks to donations from funds of the University's executive officers
including Interim President Allan Smith, a loan from the Michigan
Student Assembly, proceeds collected from the Jazz Band's concerts,
and the efforts of an executive at General Motors and the president of
the Ann Arbor Musicians Union, the Jazz Band gathered $22,000, and,
according to Diamond, expects more greenbacks from alumni and
other sources. "It's possible they'll select a college group to go to
Japan," said the enterprising Diamond. Ah, so.
Correction
A headline in Sunday's Daily, "Men call women's lib close-
minded," misrepresented the tone of the story and the event to which
it referred. The headline lent an antagonistic edge to the story, in-
dicating that the mood of the men's awareness group referred to was
hostile. Although the specific statements and conclusions drawn were
correct, overall, the meeting was more supportive of the women's
liberation movement than the specific incidents reported in the article
would indicate. The Daily apologizes for the error.
Take ten
About 1,2000 Harvard students voted a three-day strike on April 10,
1969 in response to a police raid that recaptured University Hall in
Cambridge from students protesting the Reserve Officers Training
Corps program. More than 400 policemen wearing helmets and plastic
face masks and carrying nightsticks rushed University Hall at 5 a.m.
that day and arrested students in the building who had ignored a
University order to leave the night before. Also that day, nearly 400
students at Stanford University across the country continued to oc-
cupy a campus electronics laboratory in protest against classified
research there.
0

The Michigan Daily-Tuesday, April 10, 1979-Page3..

GREAT LAKES FISH THREATENED

Indian fishing rights disputed

Happenings

FILMS
Ann Arbor Film Co-op - One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest, 8:30,
10:45 p.m., Angell, Aud. A.
Cinema Guild - David Copperfield, 7,9:30 p.m., Old Arch. Aud.
Students Concerned About Suicide - College Can Be Killing, 7:30
p.m, Bursley.
PERFORMANCES
Music School - Concert Band and Chamber Winds, 8 p.m, Hill
Aud. .
Canterbury Loft - Ten Faces of the Campus Rapists, in French
and English, 8 p.m., Canterbury Loft.
SPEAKERS
Museum of Zoology - University of Texas' Prof. Guy Bush,
"Sympatrick Speciation and Other Hopeful Monsters," 4 p.m., MLB
Lecture Room 1.
International Center - Tuesday Luncheon, Prof. Joseph Veroff,
"Feelings of Well-Being, 1957-1976," noon, Inteinational Center
Recreation Center.
Center for Chinese Studies - Three China experts, Li "Chi, Harriet
Mills, and Albert Feuerwerker, "The May Fourth Movement: Its
Meaning, Past and Present," noon, Lane Hall, Commons Room.
MISCELLANEOUS
Meeting - National Organization for Women, 7:45 p.m., coffee, 8
p.m., meeting, Unitarian Church, 1917 Washtenaw Ave.
Journeys - Presentation at the Ann Arbor Public Library,
discussion of "The Snow Leopard, the Yeti, and Other Himalayan
Myths," noon.
Meeting - Peace Education Study Group, to discuss "Conflict,
Violence, and Non-Violence," 8:30 p.m., Michigan Union, Conference
Room 4.
Black Law Student's Assoc. - Second Annual Alden J "Butch"
Carpenter Dinner-Dance, Campus Inn Regency Ballroom, 7 p.m.,
April 14. Tickets available between 10 a.m. and 2 p.m., Hutchins Hall,
Room 100.
Fighting City Hall
There's the Coalition for Better Housing, the Washtenaw County
Coalition Against Apartheid, and many other coalitions in Ann Arbor
for various issues that are too numerous to list. But at Michigan State
University (MSU), students have formed a new coalition to fight for
something near and dear to their pocketbooks - the Anti-Towing
Coalition, primarily composed of students living in Case Hall. The
students said they're complaining about a local service station which
tows illegally parked cars for MSU. The students claim the station's
employees are removing vehicles from reserved parking spaces when
the spaces aren't being used by authorized vehicles. "We understand
it's against university regulations to park in certain spaces," said the
group's leader, Paul Schwartz, a first-year student from West Bloom-
field, Michigan. "But we also understand if there's a car there and it's
not bothering anyone, there's no reason the space can't be used."
Students often have to fork over $35 to retrieve their cars. Demon-
strations by the Anti-Towing Coalition within the past few weeks have
been spur of the moment, but the group plans another demonstration
this week, which will begin with a wailing siren. The coalition is plan-
ning to prevent tow trucks from removing cars from the parking lot
outside Case Hall by ,peacefully sitting cross-legged around the
wreckers, although campus police last month warned demonstrators
that damaging a wrecker or interfering with authorities would result
in arrest. The students also plan to flood the local district court with
parking violation cases by claiming innocence and requesting jury
trials. Activism isn't dead, it's just being channeled into different
areas.

By RICHARD BLANCHARD
"The Indian situation is the
skeleton in the closet of democracy
that keeps reminding the American
people of the deceit of the federal
government. " John Bailey, a mem-
ber of Michigan's Odawa tribe, and
director of the Michigan Committee
on Indian Affairs.
In the heart of Lake Michigan's
soothing and refreshing waters swims
the object of an embittered and violent
fishing rights controversy between the
Native Americans and the State of
Michigan. This controversy involves
the lake's possible depletion of its most
prized fish, the lake trout.
In a symposium entitled "Fisheries
and Native American Rights" held last
weekend at Rackham and S. Quad,
representatives of the Michigan Depar-
tment of Natural Resources (DNR), the
Bay Mills Indian community, and the
Michigan Steelheaders Association
debated the issues of Indian fishing
rights and resource depletion.
ON APRIL 17, 1973, the Bay Mills and
Sault Ste. Marie tribes, both Chippewa,
filed a suit in Federal District Court
against the State of Michigan, that
claimed that the state, in an effort to
regulate fishing in some areas of the
Great Lakes, have violated the 1836
established treaty rights of Michigan's
Native Americans.'
There are two phases to the case, ac-
cording to University Resource
Management grad. student John Mc-
Dermott. The first phase determines
the right of Native Americans to fish the
waters of Great Lakes uncontrolled by
state DNR fishing regulations, and, if
this right is accepted by the court, the
second phase will determine hov to
regulate Indian fisheries to prevent
depletion of fish stocks.
John Scott, who represented the state
DNR in the symposium, claimed that
the Native Americans are seriously
depleting such fish as lake trout, and
must be regulated like all other
Michigan residents by state laws. "The
Natives are claiming exclusive and
superior fishing rights, not subject to
state laws and not subject to federal
codes," said Scott.
THE STATE DNR is the Indians'
primary adversary. The Department
claims that the natives' right to fish in
regulated waters has been ac-
cumulated through subsequent State-
Indian treaties and should be subject to
state control, McDermott said.
Elizabeth Valentine, also represen-
ting the stateDNR, said according to
the original Treaty of 1836, there was no
explicit mention of fishing rights. "The
State of Michigan," said Valentine,
"holds the opinion that fishing was of
little consequence to the tribe, and, sin-
ce it was not specifically mentioned, it
was not important."
According to McDermott, the Bay
Mills Indian community understands
the treaty of 1836 to have guaranteed its
fishing rights to the waters adjoining
lands they ceded to the American
government.
NATIVE AMERICAN tribes are
sovereign political units and are free
from state control and regulations;
therefore, the Native Americans are
represented by the federal government
in this case, said McDermott.
BIll LeBlanc, spokesman for the Bay
Mills Indian community, began the
native American's position on the con-
troversy by quoting a DNR official who
said, "The meek shall inherit the earth,
but not the mineral rights." This is the
DNR's view of the treaties which are
designed to "take away from the In-
dians rather than give to them," said
LeBlanc.
LeBlanc said the current court case
before Federal District Court Judge
Noel Fox in Grand Rapids is not to
determine whether the Indians have the

unabridged right to fish the Great
Lakes, but to prove to and prevent
harrassment by sport and commercial
fishermen that the fishing right is
guaranteed to them. "Michigan state
courts through the years have always
upheld that fishing right," said
LeBlanc.
MANN THEATRES
FOX V[LL(
MAM VILAG INCENTE~
ADMISSION
Adult $4.00 No Passes on Weekends
Child $2.50
YOU'LL BELIEVE
A MAN CAN FL Y
SUPERMAN
MARLON BRANDO
GENE HACKMAN
SHOWTIMES
Mon-FRI 7:00 9:45
SAT. & SUN.
1:30 7:00'
4:15 9:45

"ALL WE are asking for," LeBlanc
continued, "is the recognition that we
can make a living. We would never
have ceded our lands to the government
without a guarantee of fishing rights.
Fishing is central to our way of life."
Depletion of lake trout is the key point
in the controversy. Although the DNR
claims there has been 90 per cent
reduction of lake trout in Whitefish Bay
as a result of Indian fishing, there has
not been enough data to prove the case,
said McDermott.
Regulation of the fishing is the main
concern of the DNR, said McDermott,
not which group manages it.
Unregulated fishing by Native
Americans, sportsmen, or commercial
fisheries all pose a serious threat to the
Great Lakes fishery, he added.
IN 1966, the DNR, reflecting the
needs of recreational fishing and the
amount of money that it brings to
fisheries' management programs,
designated lake trout as a sport fish
only, said Scott. "We began our conser-
vation methods by banning gill nets (a
non-selective fishing device), and at
that time enough nets were brought up
to stretch around the globe," said Scott.
In response to these claims, LeBlanc
said that the Native Americans'
use of gill nets is not responsible for the
reductions of lake trout. The DNR has
relaxed regulations enforcement over
the Great Lakes which has allowed
poachers of lake trout and made native
Americans appear responsible for the
depletion of fish, LeBlanc said.
The Native Americans have self-
imposed fish and game management
regulations. They are responsible for
this resource and are using conser-
vation methods to prolong the lake trout
and other fish populations, said
LeBlanc.
BOTH SIDES of the case have been
delivered to Judge Fox, but because of
the six years that have elapsed since
1973, the DNR and conservation groups
have become increasingly concerned
over the present situation of the fish
populations, McDermott said.
Although there is bitter dispute and
raging controversy, both sides agree
that the solutions will be found in
All Media Company
present
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April 13 &14 S:OOpm $.50
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Sponsored by MI Student Assembly,
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THE
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By Joseph AWalker
Featuring MEL WNLER.
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Wed. April II " Sat. April 14 8PM.
Sun.April 152PM Power Center

cooperative regulation and increased
communications, according to
LeBlanc.
The DNR "accepts the challenge to
coordinate the harvest" and although it
does not accept that the fishing right for
the native Americans is established, it
is ready with management options and
fishing opportunities for Native
Americans, either way Judge Fox may
detcide the case, according to Scott.
The Native Americans uphold their
right to fish, and are willing, said
LeBlanc, to enact regulations on them-
selves congruous with DNR guidelines
as long as the rules are based on fact.
"The only way to solve the problem,"
said LeBlanc, "is to sit down and
negotiate the terms and the methods of
regulating those terms."

The Ann Arbor Film Cooperstive presents at Aud A
Tuesday, April 10
ONE FLEW OVER THE CUCKOO'S NEST
(Milos Forman, 1975) 8:30 & 10:45-AUD A
JACK NICHOLSON is electrifying as a free-spirited rogue named Randle
P. McMurphy who wages psychological warfare against a mental hospital
nurse (LOUISE FELTCHER) who fights to keep sadistic control over the
inmates. Based on Ken Kesey's celebrated novel, this film won five
Academy Awards, including Best Picture. "A powerful, smashingly
effective movie.'"-Pauline Kael. "Nicholson shows an acting range
matched by few other actors in the world."-Steven Scheuer.
Tomorrow: Antonioni's LA NATTLE
and Zanussi's ILLUMINATION

The University of Michigan
Gilbert and Sullivan Society
~Presents
Or
'The Lass That Loved A Sailor'
April 5-8 and 12-14.1979
Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre,
Ann Arbor
Tickets ovailbie at the Mendelssohn Box office
10 am.- 8pm.Call1763-1085.

SPECIAL STUDENT RATE
Students wih U of M I.U. may purchase tickets
at a discount for performances on April 5, 8, and
12. These tickets will be on sale only from 2-4
p.m. at the Mendelssohn Box Office the Wednes-
day preceding the performance.
Price: $2.50 LIMIT: I ticket/U of M I. D.

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Professional Theatre Program
The University of Michigan.- Guest Artist Series
Tickets at PT.P Box Office in the Michigan League
313/764-0450 & through all Hudson's Ticket Outlets
Parental Guidance Suggested
12 & Under Not Admitted

HOUSING DIVISION
COUZENS HALL
RESIDENT STAFF APPLICATIONS
FOR SPRING/SUMMER 1979

AVAILABLE STARTING APRIL 3, 1979
IN 1500 SAB

POSITIONS INCLUDE: RESIDENT DIRECTOR AND RESIDENT ADVISOR
Resident Advisor positions require a minimum of 55 credit hours., Graduate status preferred for
the Resident Directors positions.
QUALIFICATIONS: (1) Must be a registered U. of M. student on the Ann Arbor campus in good
academic standing during the period of employment. (2) Must have completed a minimum of 55
credit hours. (3) Preference will be given to applicants who have lived in residence halls at Uni-
versity level for at least one year. (4) Undergraduates must have a 2.5 cumulative grade point
average at the time of application. (5) Proof of these qualifications may be required.
Current staff and other applicants who have an application on file must come to this office to
update their application form. Staff selection and placement shall be determined in the following
order:

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fr a 1070-.Rf1 7 anademic vear.

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