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April 10, 1979 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1979-04-10

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PNge 2--Tuesday, April 10, 1979-The Michigan Daily

GEORGE CUKOR'S

1935

DAVID COPPERFIELD
Features W. C. FIELDS as Micawber. LIONEL BARRYMORE as Daniel Peggotty,
BASIL RATHBONE as Mr. Murdstone, EDNA MAE OLIVER as Aunt Betsy Trot-
wood, FREDDIE BARTHOLOMEW as David, MAUREEN O'SULLIVAN as Dora,
ROLAND YOUNG as Uriah Heep, LEWIS STONE as Mr. Wickfield, JESSIE RALPH
as Nurse Peggotty, and LENNOX PAWLE as Mr. Dick. Some of the finest
character actors in film history recreate some of the best-loved characters
in literature.
THURS: TRUFFAUT'S DAY FOR NIGHT

'U' child care seeks support

CINEMA GUILD

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By MARION HALBERG
A rally is being held on the Diag today
that has nothing to do with South
African divestment, tenure or any other
trendy student issues. The participants
in the noon rally will, instead, primarily
be made up of pre-schoolers and mem-
bers of the University's Child Care
Coalition, who will be demonstrating
for more University support of child
care centers.
"There are three things we're calling
for," said Margaret Elias, co-director
of the Child Care Action Center
(CCAC), "One is for people to recognize
that parents and children exist on cam-
pus; two is to celebrate the Inter-
national Year of the Child; and three is
to support the idea of child care on
campus."
THE CCAC AND the Pound House
Children's Center at 1024 Hill St. are the

only child care centers in the area that
have an affiliation with the University.
The two centers care for 36 and 25
children, respectively, and each has a
waiting list of about 85 families.
But the survival of the CCAC was it-
self threatened earlier this year when
the state fire marshall refused to renew
the center's license. Located on the
third floor of the School of Education,
the center does not meet the stringent
demands of fire officials who say that
child care centers must be located on
the first floors of buildings. Although
the license has been extended for a few
more months, the CCAC must even-
tually relocate.
"It is my feeling," said Elias, "That
the University has a responsibility to
those students who they accept that
have children. One problem is that so
many people don't see the children, so

they don't see it as an issue."
THOSE CONNECTED with the child
care problem say that the University
should provide more space for child
care centers - particularly on the Nor-
th Campus area where most of the
families live.
"All we're asking for from North
Campus, is space," said Kathy
Modigliani, co-coordinator of the Pound
House. "We can make it on our own. All
we're asking for is space. There is a lot
of North Campus space that is not being
used, but the University says that it has
the potential to be used in the future."
But Carolyne Davis, Associate Vice-
President for Academic Affairs, said
the University doesn't have any space
available and that child care is not a
University program, although it does
serve University students.

Davis said the CCAC, "are welcome
to stay where they are. We obviously
could use the space they're in. What lit-
tle space we've got left isn't useful for
them (due to fire code regulations)."
WHEN ASKED if there is a demand
for child care on campus, Davis said
"There are three programs around and
a number of them care for student
children. This indicates that there is a
demand for them. But there are other
priorities. We're not denying them
(child care), but it can't compete with
academic needs.
"You just can't do everything for
everyone," Davis continued. "We've
got to maintain academic programs
before getting into other'areas."
CCAC's Elias hopes a lot of people
will show up for today's rally. "We're
trying to keep it friendly, we don't want
to antagonize anyone," she said.

Brown arrives in Kenya with Linda in tow

From AP and Reuter
NAIROBI - California Governor
Jerry Brown flew to Kenya yesterday
with rock singer Linda Ronstadt for a
big game safari. -
Brown, 41, said he had "just come to
look around" and appeared surprised
at the number of reporters and
photographers who awaited him at the.
TAs awarded
Ten University teaching assistants
were honored April 4 for outstanding
achievement.
They received the University's Out-
standing Teaching Assistant Awards
for 1978-79, each carrying a $500
stipend. The winners and their units
are:
Catherine Back, Ross Koning and R.
Jean Stout, biological sciences;
Patricia Baudoin, comparative
literature, Residential College; Johnny'
Brown, mathematics; Lois Kalloway,
history; Sandra Kinghorn, sociology;
Alan Levy, political science, Stacey
Olster and Amy Ronner, English.

airport.
HE ASKED THE journalists, "What
are you guys doing here?" They asked
whether he and Miss Ronstadt, whom
he has dated off and on since the early
1970s, intended to be married in Kenya.
He replied, "I prefer not to speculate on
matters of my personal life. Most of the
rumors you have heard are not true."
Brown, considered a contender for
the Democratic presidential
nomination in 1980, left the Nigerian
Airways plane first. Miss Ronstadt was
last off the jet, avoiding the reporters.
She was driven to the Norfolk Hotel
where she joined musician friends in
their rooms.
Brown was greeted by the American
Ambassador to Kenya, Wilbert le
Molle.
BROWN ARRIVED at the Norfolk
\Hotel about 40 minutes after Miss Ron-
stadt. Earlier, Brown talked to repor-
ters at length about ecology, soil
problems, the environment and nuclear
energy.

He said it was his interest in ecology
that drew him to Kenya, and he was
paying for his own trip.
"I'm interested in the planet, its soils
and forests. The people of California
have an interest in ecology, and Kenya
has similar problems," he said.
HE SAID, "Nuclear power is in big
trouble in California." Asked whether
Miss Ronstadt shared his interests in
the environment, he said, "I don't want
to speak for Linda, but she has held
concerts against nuclear power.'
Brown said that today he would visit
the United Nations Environment
Program, an ecological body headquar-
tered in Nairobi. Although Brown said
he had no official business in Kenya,
Ambassador Le Molle said the gover-
nor would meet today with President
Daniel Arap Moi.
Brown expressed amazement that so
many reporters were dogging him
when there was a war on in neighboring
Uganda, and said, "I think you should
all go to Kampala."

Brown
... Won't talk about Linda

b

Lance linked to bribe scheme

WASHINGTON (AP)-Former
budget director Bert Lance called the
White House after he had left the Carter
administration on behalf of two'
businessmen who were trying to'
arrange a bribe for oil drilling rights in
the Middle East, the Justice Depar-
tment said yesterday.
However, federal investigators said
they have no evidence that Lance knew
of the alleged bribery attempts or
received anything in return for inter-
ceding at the White House.
AND WHITE HOUSE spokesman
Jody Powell said he saw nothing im-
proper in Lance's call to the White
House; Powell said White House han-
dling of the matter was routine.
Lance has been under federal in-
vestigation for a year and a half in
unrelated matters concerning his
banking practices.

Lanc
... Charged with influence-peddling

The Justice Department filed a civil
suit in Miami yesterday seeking a court
order to block any future payoff attem-
bts by the two defendants in the
Mideast case, R. Eugene Holley of
Augusta, Ga., and Roy Carver of Miami
and Muscatine, Iowa.
THE DEFENDANTS consented to
the court order without admitting any
past wrongdoing, and U.S. District
Judge Jose Gonzales issued a per-
manent injunction prohibiting Carver
and Holley from violating the federal
Foreign Corrupt Practices Act.
The complaint alleged the two paid
$1.5 million through a Swiss bank ac-
count in 1976 to Ali Jaiday, then director
of petroleum affairs in the Middle
Eastern nation of Qatar, in return for
oil rights.
I t4gan
is preserved on
Qmm
The Michigan Daily
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TECHNICAL
GRADS & MBAs:
Texas Instruments is opening a
whole new world for you in marketing.
The revolution in consumer electronics is just begin-
ning. The world market for consumer electronic
products within the scope of TI's interest is projected
to grow from $8.1 billion in 1978 to more than $25
billion by the late 1980s.
Openings/BenefIts
Texas Instruments has openings for Bachelor of Sci-
ence in Electrical Engineering, Computer Science or
Physics. MBA preferred for all categories. If you have
a high degree of motivation for marketing/pales,
marketing development and planning, marketing re-
search, etc., and would like to live in Dallas or Lub-
bock, Texas, with subsequent assignments to the field
in major cities throughout the nation, then you are
the kind of individual Ti is looking for in our growth
marketing program.
Frontier:
This market is still a frontier.
Consider these facts. See what they tell you about the
career potential of marketing/sales at TI:
- TI's goal is to be a $10 billion company by the
late 1980s.
" One of TI's three major growth thrusts is consumer
electronics.
- TI has long been the leader in solid-state technol-
ogies. It is this catalyst technology that provides the
foundation to TI's leadership in consumer elec-
tronics such as handheld and programmable cal-
culators, watches, electronic learning aids, and
other soon-to-be-announced new consumer
products.
Opportunities
At TI we are aware of your efforts to receive the best
education possible, and we recognize that you want
to fully utilize your abilities--immediately. We need
.i. noieaA.. l ..andskills andwill nrovide nm with

ACCORDING TO the suit, they.
already had invested $17 million in the
company and were having trouble get-
ting additional financing to continue the
project in Qatar.
As a result, the Justice Department
said, they were in danger of losing their
oil exploration rights in 1978 when they:
turned to Lance for help.
The suit said Jaidah was no longer:
the oil minister then and the business
partners, who were behind schedule in
developing the oil field, were looking
for another official to bribe to renew
their drilling concessions.
THE NATIONAL Bank of Georgia
had loaned the partners $200 thousand
in 1976 when Lance was bank president
and Holcar's stock was put up as
collateral.
The suit said that in February 1978,
Lance called Eleanor Connors, an aide
to Carter assistant Hamilton Jordan, to
arrange a meeting between Holley and
State Department officials.
Daily Official Bulletin
TUESDAY, APRIL 10, 1979
Daily Calendar:
Physics/Astronomy: D. Axelrod. "Molecular:
Motion On and in Biological Surfaces," 2038 Randall,
4 p.m.
General Notices:
CEW will name twenty-eight CEW scholars for
1979-80 on Thursday, April 19. Dorothy G. McGuigan,
Program Director of the Center. will talk with the.
honorees and their guests about the 168 preceeding
Scholars. Their diversity and excellence is reflected,
in this year's Scholars who are also beginning or con-
tinuing undergraduate, graduate, and professional
degrees at the U-M. The award program and recep-
tion celebrating the ninth year of CEW Scholarships
is at 8 p.m. in the Assembly Hall. All interested
women and men are welcome.
The Computing Center announces a short course'
on "OVERDRIVE-A FORTRAN Preprocessor." It
will be - held in the Seminar
Room, First Floor, Computing Center on Tuesday, 10
April. from 7:30-9:30 p.m.
Questions about the course may be directed to
Fred Swartz at the Computing Center, 764-2121.
Registration is not required.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY
NA T'L DENTA L BOARDS(USPS 344-900)
NUR SIN G BO A RDSVolume LXXXIX, No. 152
Fle xible Prog rams & Hours Tuesday, April 10, 1979
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