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January 13, 1979 - Image 2

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1979-01-13

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Page 2-Saturday, January 13, 1979-The Michigan Daily

Students blast LSA-SG President

Church Worship Services

foil

LORD OF LIGHT LUTHERAN
CHURCH
(The Campus Ministry of the ALC-LCA)
Gordon Ward, Pastor
801 S. Forest at Hill St.
Sunday, Jan. 14:
11:00 a.m.-Worship Service; a con-
temporary folk service in an informal
setting-all are welcome to join us.
12:15 p.m.-Social luncheon. Free and
open to all.
Monday, Jan. 15:
7:00 p.m.-Martin Luther King
Celebration at Bethel AME Church, 900
Plum; we are joining with several other
area congregations to commemorate
King on the anniversary of his birth.
Wednesday, Jan. 17:
7:00 p.m.-Choir practice; new choir
,members are always welcome!
8:30 p.m.-Bible Study; a study of the
history and theology of the Old
Testament; led by Gary Herion, a
doctoral student in Old Testament
studies.
* * *
FIRST UNITED METHODIST
CHURCH
120 S. State St.
(Corner of State and Huron)
Worship Schedule:
8:30 a.m.-Holy Communion in the
Chapel.
9:30 and 11:00 a.m.-Morning Wor-
ship in the Sanctuary.
Church School for All Ages-9:30
a.m. and 11 a.m..
Choir Rehearsal Thursday-7:15
p.m.
Ministers:
Dr. Donald B. Strobe
Rev. Fred B. Maitland
Dr. Gerald R. Parker
Education Director: Rose McLean
Intern: Carol Bennington
CAMPUS CHAPEL
(One Block North of S. University and
Forest)
-1236 Washtenaw Ct.
Rev. Don Postema, Pastor
10 a.m.-Service of Holy Communion.
6 p.m.-Evening Worship,

ST. MARY STUDENT CHAPEL
(Catholic)
331 Thompson-663-0557
Weekly Masses:
Daily-Mon.-Fri. 5:10 p.m.
Saturday-7:00 p.m.
Sunday-7:45 a.m., 9 a.m., 10:30
a.m., noon, and 5 p.m.
North Campus Mass-9:30 a.m. at
Bursley Hall, West Cafeteria.
Divorced Catholic Meeting Friday at
7:30p.m. -
Right of Reconciliation-4 p.m.-5
p.m. on Friday only; any other time
by appointment.
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
1432 Washtenaw Av.e.-662-4466
William M. Ferry
Carl R. Geider
Graham M. Patterson
Services of Worship:
Sunday 9:30 and 11:00 a.m.
Coffee hour at 12 noon.
Student Fellowship meets at 4:00
p.m.
Tuesday at 7:30 p.m.-Campus Bible
Study in the French room.
WESLEY FOUNDATION
UNITED METHODIST
CAMPUS MINISTRY
602 E. Huron at State, 668-6881
Rev. W. Thomas Schomaker, Chaplain
Rev. Anne Broyles, Chaplain
Shirley Polakowski, Office Manager
Sunday-5:00-Song practice.
Sunday, 5:30 p.m.-Worship service
followed by shared meal.
EMMANUEL BAPTIST CHURCH
2535 Russell Street
Sunday School-10 a.m.
Morning Worship-11 a.m.
Thursday Bible Study and Prayer-
7:00 p.m.
Sunday Evening Service, 727 Miller,
Community Room-6:00 p.m.
For spiritual help or a ride to our
services please feel free to call Pastor
Leonard Sheldon, 761-0580.
Affiliated with G.A.R.B.C.

CHURCH OF CHRIST
530 W. Stadium
(Across from Pioneer High)
Schedule of Services:
Sunday-Bible School-9:30 a.m.
Worship-10:30 a.m. and 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday-Bible Study-7:30 p.m.
Koinonia
(A Bible Study for college students)
For information call.662-2756
Wilburn C. Hill and Larry Phillips,
Evangelists
Transportation: 662-9928
* * *
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
Serving the Campus for LCMS
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
1511 Washtenaw Ave.
663-5560 and 668-8720
Double Sunday Services-9= 15 a.m.
and 10:30 a.m.
Sunday Bible Study at 9:15 a.m.
Midweek Worship-Wednesday at
10:00 p.m.
Midweek Bible Study-Thursday at
7:30 p.m.
* * *
AMERICAN BAPTIST CAMPUS
CENTER at FIRST BAPTIST
CHURCH
512 E. Huron St.-663-9376
Jitsuo Morikawa, Minister
Worship-10 a.m.-"Structure of
Purpose"-Mr. Morikawa.
11 a.m.-College Bible Study.
Wednesday, Jan. 17, 7:30 p.m.-
American Baptist Student Fellowship.
Sermon talk-back with Mr. Morikawa
in the Campus Center Lounge.
* * *
CANTERBURY LOFT
Episcopal Campus Ministry
332 Sqgth State St.
Rev Andrew Foster, Chaplain
S&JNDAY COMMUNITY EVENTS:
11:00 a.m.-Bruch and Social Hour.
12:00 noon-Celebration of the Holy
Eucharist.
Canterbury Loft serves Episcopal-
ians at the University of Michigan and
sponsors - fograms in the arts which
have ethical or spiritual themes.
STUDENTS
Join us for Sunday School and Worship
PACKARD ROAD BAPTIST CHURCH
Packard & Stone School Road
Sunday School-9:45 a.m.
Worship-11:00 a.m.
For transportation-ell +A9-01953

(Continued from Page 1)
doubts about the endorsement. "If that
issue had come up before Council, I
would have argued against it," said
Vice-President Kathy Friedman. "I did
not support the position. I didn't even
know about it."
Victor Kay, leader of the USI, ex-
pressed serious concern about
Stechuk's endorsement. "It took a lot of
nerve. He may be overstepping his
limits and abusing his power. Advocacy
Coordinator, by its name, implies some
sort of process."
Stechuk explained that, at the time,
Council members were busy with
exams and unable to convene. A
meeting took place between the
Palestinian group and Stechuk, with
two other Council members present.
After an organized presentation, the
group persuaded Stechuk to endorse the
protest.

Stechuk says that the University was
unjustified in not presenting pro-
Palestinian voices at the same time.
"The University does not provide for a-
full method of dissemination, enabling
students to make rational views on
issues ... In this case, they are not
promoting an opportunity for students
to appreciate the Palestinian position."
He also stressed the fact that he does
not condone the disruption. Stechuk
asserted that his support was for a
peaceful demonstration which occurred
outside the Rackham Building.
A group which has organized around
this issue would like to see Stechuk
retract the endorsement, and apologize
publicly to Allon. In-addition, Victor
Kay would like to see him "condemn
the disruption".
A seminar to discuss the conflict is
scheduled for 1 p.m. Sunday at Guild/
House. All are welcome.

Lutheran Pastor
Scheips retires
After 36 years of service to the
University and the city, Pastor and
Mrs. Alfred Scheips plan to retire from
their work with the University
Lutheran Chapel in February.
The Scheips came to Ann Arbor to
begin the first Lutheran full-time cam-
pus ministry in the country. Services
were initially held in the Michigan
League Chapel, but the church soon
moved to a frame house on Washtenaw.
The University Lutheran Chapel and
Student Chapel was constructed under
the Scheips' guidance in 1948, and is
still the home of their ministry.
Pastor Scheips is a member of the
Kiwanis Club of Ann Arbor. Through
the Michigan Club of Ann Arbor, he has,
served the University alumni as a
member of the Board of Directors as
well as ship's captain on numerous
alumni cruises.
Mrs. Scheips belongs to the Ann Ar-
bor Women's City Club.

Co-op takes student
govt re.to court

(Continued from Page 1)
Abdul-Musqit moved into Xanadu in
November of 1977 after he moved from
his Ypsilanti apartment. DSS then sent
him to the Intercooperative Council
(ICC), an ICC spokesperson said. At the
time, Abdul-Musqit attended
Washtenaw County Community
College.
A month after Abdul-Musqit moved
into Xanadu, his DSS case worker told
him he would have to leave. According
to the ICC, there was a question about
whether the DSS could pay his board.
Ultimately, DSS did not approve Abdul-
Musqit's stay at Xanadu.
While at Xanadu, Abdul-Musqit rasa
up large phone bills, which he claims
DSS should pay. He says DSS was
responsible for his ropm, board, and
living expenses at the co-op.
ABDUL-MUSQIT/ said Xanadu's
financial claims should not be against
' him, but against the DSS.
XANADU MEMBER Jim Gerber
claims Abdul-Musqit has not attempted

to cooperate with either Xanadu or
DSS. Abdul-Musqit has paid $43 in rent,
and house members feel he owes them
a lot more.
Abdul-Musqit claims he never
received a bill for rent of a phone bill.
He also says he would have liked
Xanadu members to approach him per-
sonally with the charges. He refuses to
pay Xanadu any money until it has been
proved he is responsible for his debts.
THE DAY OF the January 9 hearing,
Gerber claims he ran into Abdul-fusqit
at the Michigan Union, and was
physically intimidated. Abdul-Musqit
says he just wanted to talk to Gerber.
Gerber told Abdul-Musqit he would see
him in court, and Abdul-Musqit then
told Gerber he didn't know anything
about it.
Abdul-Musqit, elected to LSA-SG on
the United Students slate in November,
said that Xanadu should be taking the
Social Services Department to court.
He has also demanded a full public
apology from Xanadu members.

earn 1OO-0
amonth
for 2 or 3 hours a week of your spare time.
donate plasma
You may save a life!
It's easy and relaxing. Be a twice-a-week regular.
$10 cash each donation, plus bonuses.
this ad worth $5 extra
New donors only. Phone for appointment.
ANN ARBOR PLASMA CORPORATION
662-7744

Local housing hunt is on

* * *t
UNIVERSITY CHURCH OF
THE NAZARENE
409 S. Division
Steve Bringardner, Pastor
Church School-9:45 a.m.
Service of Worship-11:00 a.m.
Time of Meeting-6:00 p.m.
ANN ARBOR UNITARIAN
FELLOWSHIP
502 W. Huron
Phone: 429-2139
10:30 Sunday Morning, Jan. 14-
Topic Title: "Lawyers, Legal Ethics,
and Legal Education," by Charles
Borgsdorf.
Quote of the Week:
"I know of no method to secure the
repeal of bad or obnoxious laws so
effective as their stringent execution."
-Ulysses S. Grant.

(Continued from Page 1)
system work well? The list is endless,
but a friendly resident will usually ad-
vise a prospective tenant of any par-
ticularly severe problems with the
building.
Although most students live in Ann
Arbor for only eight months out of the
year, most leases are for twelve. This
means the renter who leaves for the
summer must sublet the dwelling for
30-50 per cent off of the regular rent.
Subletting usually does not relieve the
original renter of all responsibility for
the apartment. Some landlords offer
eight month leases, but at a premium
price.
Some apartment rents include utility
costs, some don't, so prospective tenan-
ts can save themselves from nasty sur-
prises next year by -checking all such
provisions in their leases before
signing.
ANOTHER WORD of caution - most
leases contain "joint and several"
clauses, meaning each leasee can be
held responsible for all of the rent.
Therefore, trustworthy roommates can
be helpful assets. According to off-
campus housing information literature
available from the University, landlor-,
ds may be hesitant to rent to tenants
who question legality of certain lease
clauses.
"Some clauses in your lease may be
illegal and. unenforceable, but since
most of your tenant rights are statutory
and therefore cannot be lost by simply
signing a lease, we recommend that
you sign the lease," the literature ad-
vises. "If you don't, or question the
lease too much, the landlord might con-
sider you a troublemaker and not rent
to you at all," the literature continues.
WILLIAMS encouraged student ren-
ters, especially first-timers, to bring

their leases to the Housing Office before
signing them. Williams said she and her
colleagues will go over the lease, ex-
plaining unclear clauses and tran-
slating the legal jargon often found in
a leases.
Based on a Fall, 1978, University sur-
vey, the following are average prices
for apartments within walking distance
of campus: (all twelve-month leases)
sleeping rooms, $120 per month; ef-
ficiencies, $215 per month; one
bedroom, $243 per month; two
bedrooms, $381 per month; three
bedrooms, $449 per month. Fall rates
will undoubtedly be higher, and lan-
dlords are not expected to adhere too
closely to President Carter's price
guidelines.
Apartments at somewhat lower rates
are available further from campus, and
Williams said there is an increasing
trend toward more students living
anywhere from one to five miles from
campus.
The University also offers several
apartment alternatives, including Ox-
ford Housing, Baits Housing, and the
Northwood Apartments (Northwood is
for married students and students with
dependents only).
Houses
MUCH OF THE information that ap-
plies to apartments -also applies to
houses,- except available houses are
harder to find. "The best ones are never
advertised," said Williams. She added
that information on houses is most often
passed by word-of-mouth, with houses
often rented to friends of the current
tenants for the next year.
She suggested that students dying for
a house hit the streets, knocking on
doors and inquiring about the status of
the house. But she warned that current

U

. ..

tenants have a right to privacy and of-
ten do not appreciate droves of prospec-
tive renters banging on their doors at
all hours.
Fraternities and Sororities
FRATERNITIES AND sororities
have enjoyed a resurgence in
popularity over the last several years,
and they remain an attractive financial
as well as social alternative. Most will
be organizing winter rushes soon and
Williams said most carry on informal
rushes throughout much of the term.
The Fraternity Coordinating Council
and the Panhellenic Association, both
located in the Michigan Union, offer in-
formation on the Greek system.
Based on a fall 1978 survey, frater-
nities averaged $205 per month while
sororities averaged $220 per month
(eight month leases including board).
Some other membership fees may also
be required.
Cooperatives
THERE ARE 22 co-ops of varying
size located in the campus area. All are
administered by the Intercooperative
Council, (ICC) headquartered in the
Michigan Union. Duties such as
cooking, cleaning, and general -main-
tenance are taken care of by residents
of the house. Work time per tenant is
generally four or five hours per week.
Application should be made at the
ICC office in the Union.
Not including some additional initial
fees, ICC co-ops run $160-165 per month,
including board for an eight-month
lease.
The University also offers some co-op
arrangements in various University
housing.
Dormitories
Students desiring another year of
dorm living will probably face a com-
plicated selection process- a dorm lot-
tery. Over the last several years, lot-
teries have been necessary because the
number of students initially wanting to
return to the dorms has exceeded ,the
number of spaces available. A certain
number must be reserved for incoming
freshpersons. Last year, however, act
cording to housing official Peter
Schoch, all lottery participants who
followed through the sometimes in-
volved procedure eventually got a
space in the dorms.

There's more to life
than playing tennis

0 0

EIRTHIUR ESIIE,

one of

America's top tennis players,
speak on{

will

CHEERS IN
BUSINESS
Monday, January 15
10:30 a.m.
in Michigan Union
Pendleton Room

The Ann Arbor Film Cooperative presents at MLB 3
Friday & Saturday, January 12 & 13
SATURDAY NIGHT FEVER
(John Badham, 1977) 7& 9-MLB3
Disco dance king in the Bay Ridge section of Brooklyn takes steps toward growing
up. With no-holds barred language, a candid description of teen-age sex, this
film is a mixture of entertainment and raw situations. A right-on-target film
with script by Norman Wexler (JOE, SERPICO), with the ultimate disco score by
the Bee Gees and David Shire. All shot on location, unquestionably the best,
steamiest disco scenes ever put on film. Starring JOHN TRAVOLTA and KAREN
GORNEY. : Outstanding film!"-C E.
Monday: Lubltsch's THE OYSTER PRINCESS & MADAME DUBARRY

p=nil

UAC-MEDIATRICS

I 3 WOMEN

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