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April 08, 1979 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1979-04-08

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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The Michigan Daily-Sunday, April 8, 1979-Pdae 3

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;rYouSEE NE WS VAPPEN CALLtDAILY
Hamourger helper
The masses of students jamming into University libraries last week
could be attributed to end-of-the-term blues, upcoming finals, or the
fact it was National Library Week. Now even Ronald McDonald has
turned against students bent on procrastinating their studies. A
prominently displayed sign at McDonald's on Maynard Street showed
Ronald McDonald giving some "sound" words of advice: "If you want
to get ahead, head for the library." Thanks a lot, Ronald, when was the
last time you were in a library?
Take ten
According to the results of a poll made public on April 8, 1969, 85 per
cent of the University students supported the idea of establishing a
University owned and operated bookstore. Little did they know that
later in the year, the University Regents would vote to establish just
such a bokstore - the University Cellar. Respondents to the sur-
vey-conducted by the Student Advisory Board of University
Relations-also gave an overwhelming stamp of approval to the
University's trimester system.

Happenings

s
SUNDAY
FILMS

Cinema Guild polanski's Repulsion, Old Arch., Aud., 7, 9:05
p.m.
Union of Students for Israel - Operation Thunderbolt: The Real
Story of Entebbe, UGLI multipurpose room, 7:30 p.m.
SPEAKERS
Kelsey Museum-Barbara Fiedler, "Carthage Then and Now"
Kelsey, 2 p.m.
Hillel Foundation-Auryeh Goren, Hebrew University, "The World
of Some of our Fathers: Crime in the Immigrant Generation," Hillel,
1429 HillSt., 6:30 p.m.
PERFORMANCES
U-M Varsity Band-conducted by Eric Becher and Larry Rachieff,
consisting of "Armenian Dances, Part I" by Alfred Reed; "First Suite
in E-flat" by Gustav Holst; "Three Choral Preludes" by William
Latham; "Children's March" by Percy Grainger; and "Variations on
a Korean Folk Song" by John Barnes Chance, Hill Aud., 2 p.m.
Music School-Euphonium Recital: Stearns Bldg., 3 p.m.
Eva Jessye Afro-American Music Collection of the U-M School of
Music-Violinist Sanford Allen will appear with pianist James Gem-
mell. Concert program consists of "Sonata in A Major, K. 526" by
W.A. Mozart; Doble Concerto sin Orquestra" by Roque Cordero;
Sonata No. 2" by George Walker; and "Sonata in d minor, Op. 108"
by Johannes Brahms, Rackham Aud., 4 p.m.
Youth Band-works by NBeethoven, Shostakovitch, Hill Aud., 8
p.m.
Gilbert and Sullivan Society-"HMS Pinafore", Mendelssohn
Theatre, 8 p.m.
Residential College-Chamber music concert, conducted by James
Heirich, Residential College Aud., East Quad, 8 p.m.
MEETINGS
Jewish Professional Group brunch and planning meeting, 623 Gott,
12 noon.
Wesley Foundation-gathering, 5 p.m.; shared meal, 5:30 p.m.;
worship, 6:15 p.m., 602 E. Huron at State St.
MISCELLANEOUS
Symposium on Women's Issues-includes speakers and workshops
(child care provided), East Quad, 10 a.m.-4:30 p.m.
Vegetarian society-potluck dinner and picnic, bring food to share,
shelter is Isle Park, 5 p.m.
Native American Students Association-Ann Arbor Indian Pow
Wow, Native American dancers, traders tables, crafts, North
American jewelry; Cleary College Aud.,1-5 p.m.
MONDAY
FILMS
Cinema Guild-Lost World, 7 p.m.; So This is Paris, 8:15 p.m., Old
Arch. Aud.
SPEAKERS
Center for Russian and East European Studies, Center for Near
East and North African studies, and Center for Chinese
Studies-Owen Lattimore, "Inner Asia in World History," Aud. D,
Angell Hall, 4 p.m.
Museum of Zoology-Prof. Rollin Coville, U. of California at
Berkeley, "Male Guarding Behavior in Solitary Wasps," MLB Lec-
ture Rm., 2, 4 p.m.
U-M Department of English-Theodore Sturgeon, award winning
science fiction writer, Aud. 3, MLB, 4 p.m.
PERFORMANCES
Royal Lichtenstein, Quarter-ring Sidewalk Circus-fifteen acts in-
cluding two narrated mime fables: "Freddie, the World's Most
Unusual Frisbee" and "Froglegs," as well as balancing, hoop
juggling, tightrope walking, fire-eating, and magic, Diag, 12 noon.
U-M School of Music-U-M harpsichord students recital, works by
William Byrd, Antonio de Cabezon, Frescobaldi, Couperin, Bach, and
Scarlatti, Cady Room, Stearns Bldg., 8 p.m.
U-M School of Music - Opera workshop, excerpts from "Carousel"
by Rodgers and Hammerstein; "Marriage of Figaro" by Mozart;
"Carmen" by Bizet; "Die Fledermaus" by Johann Strauss; "Old
Maid and the Thief" by Gian Carlo Menotti; and "Daughter of the
Regiment" by Donizetti; Recital Hall of School of Music Bldg., 8 p.m.
Canterbury Loft-"Ten Faces of the Campus Rapists", student
production in French and English, 332 S. State, 8 p.m.
MISCELLANEOUS
Public Health Student Association-World Health Day, CBS
documentary on infant feeding, "Into the Mouths of Babes," 12:10
psm.
Dr. Frank Faulkner, Director of Program. in Maternal and Child
Health at School of Public Health, "A Healthy Child, A Sure Future,"
with an introduction by Carol Tice (U.S. Commission for I.Y.C.),
"U.S, Activities for the International Year of the Child," Aud. School
of Public Health (106 S. Observatory) 3:30 p.m.
Israel Independence Day Celebration-Film and dancing with
leading Israeli folk dance teacher, Ayalah Goren, "The Tribes of

Israel, Their Cultures and Dances," Kuenzel Rm., Michigan Union, 4
p.m. Party and workshop with Ayalah Goren in Pendleton Rm., 8 p.m.
Xanadu Co-op-Scottish Country Dancing, beginners welcome, 1811
Washtenaw, 7:30-9:30 p.m.
Tlnr 'nnn A~foTr~nrvvnin------------------------------------- Di..

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From AP and UPI
GROTON, Conn. - About 3,000 anti-
nuclear protesters, some draped in
black shrouds, chanted and sang
yesterday as the Navy christened the
USS Ohio, the most powerful nuclear
submarine ever built and the first
equipped with Trident missiles.
First lady Rosalynn Carter and Adm.
Hyman Rickover, considered the father
of the nuclear Navy, were among the
dignitaries on hand for the ceremony at
General 'Dynamic's Electric Boat
shipyard.
POLICE ARRESTED 230 demon-
strators who tried to block the
shipyard's main gate and charged them
with disorderly conduct. Thirty-seven
who declined to give police their names
were also charged with resisting arrest.
Protesters lined the streets near the
Thames River shipyard, but huge con-
struction bays hid them from view of
the estimated 20,000 guests at the
christening and their quiet demon-
stration could not be heard.
"We'll keep arresting them all day if

we have to," Police Chief Joseph San-
dora said as a caravan of school buses
and police vans removed the protesters
to the Groton jail and returned to pick
up new loads.
A SMALL GROUP OF Yale Univer-
sity students conducted a counter-
protest at the plant's gates, saying the
Trident was "a triumph of American
ingenuity and crucial for American
defense."
But the larger group of protesters
chanted and sang their opposition to the
Trident and to nuclear power in
general.
"This is like Harrisburg. It is uncon-
trollable. You can't stop it," one banner
said.
Another urged the 12,000 invited
guests attending the ceremony to
"Please think of your children, please
think of yourselves, please go home."'
U.S. SEN. JOHN Glenn (D-Ohio),
called the 24-missile Ohio the "most
formidable strategic weapons delivery
system ever devised."
The 560-foot submarine will have

more than 10 times the fire power of the
Navy's first ballistic missile submarine
launched 20 years ago. Each of the
Trident I missiles' multiple warheads
rpnt dl~ ha fiv tima'ha diers

Money restricts P
road repair options

3,000 protest new nuclear sub

N.
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repore my Las ive imesn e e estruc- of the SALT talks.
tive power of the Hiroshima bomb.
Annie Glenn, the senator's wife, MS. CARTER, in a speech, srid
christened the Ohio with one swat of a "premature public debate on issues
bottle of domestic champagne while the such as this can be damaging." -
submarine's 154-man crew stood at at- She said the President "is not wiling
tention on the deck. to accept a SALT treaty that is mit in
GLENN, THE first U.S. astronaut to the best interest of our country andl hot
orbit the earth, characterized the $1.2 verifiable. If he had been, he could have
billion Trident submarine as a "truly done it in the past two years." '
significant deterrent to war. Ms. Carter, after the Ohio ceremony,
"It also guarantees return an- spoke at a keel-laying ceremony for
nihilation for any mistaken Soviet another Trident submarine, the.USS
decision that a first-strike knockout Georgia, and marked her initials an the
punch against the United States is even keel. Electric Boat has contracts " to
remotely possible, as some doomsday build seven Tridents, the Georgia ,will
scenario analysts have suggested," he be the fourth.
added. Also attending the Ohio christening
At the request of President Carter, were Navy Secretary Graham Clayton
Glenn deleted 11 paragraphs of his Jr., Chief of Naval Operations Thomas
speech that dealt with demands the Hayward; and Govs. Ella Grasso of
United States should make of the Soviet Connecticut and Joseph Garrahy :of
Union before signing a new Strategic Rhode Island.
COUPON
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611 CHURCH-Next to Sec. of State
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Milos Forman 196;1
FIREMAN'S BALL :
The firemen of a small Czech village stage a ball in honor of their aged'
chief; but the old man is quickly forgotten as the affair gives way to a torent
of catastrophes. Foremost among the evening's disasters is the funniest
and the most wonderfully demoralizing beauty contests ever conceived.
the director of ONE FLEW OVER THE CUCKOO'S NEST. Czech w/ subtitles,.
(73 min.)
WED-Marcel Camus' BLACK ORPHEUS
TONITE at Angell Hall, Aud. 'A' v
7 8:30, 10 $1.50 4

Arms Limitation Treaty. The senator,
who said the President telephoned him
to go over the speech, said he made the
deletion because of the sensitive nature

By RICK BLANCHARD

Potholes and road repairs may have
been fuel for recent political cam-
paigns, but the real issue, according to
Mike Anderson of the Washtenaw Coun-
ty Road Commission, is money.
Anderson, supervisor of road main-
tenance for the county road
system-the roads outside city
limits-said the county would have
fewer problems each spring if "we
could build each road from the ground
up.
"THIS WOULD involve," he said last
week, "100 per cent construction and a
tremendous amount of money.
"Each year," Anderson continued,
"the ground under the road goes
through several freeze-thaw cycles
causing the ground to move and then
crack the pavement. Water collects in
these cracks and freezes, then, along
with the pounding of traffic and ad-
ditional freezing and thawing, we get
potholes."
The remedy for the potholes, which
are the same procedures used in the
city, is to patch and cover the problem.
Materials for this hole plugging process
are a summer hot mix, and a winter hot
and cold mix of patching asphalt that
the road maintenance crews dump in
the holes then hope for the best.
"AFTER THIS procedure we go to a
seal coat-a mixture of liquid asphalt
and stone suitable for roads of low traf-
fic volume-in the summer months,
this seals the road so water can't get
in," explained Anderson.
Anderson said that even though the
Road Commission is only 19 per cent of
the way through the year they are
already 26 per cent of the way through
their budget. "In the last three weeks
we have used $14,500 (402 tons) worth of
hot mix, $1,300 (80 tons) in cold patch,
and $4,600 (80 tons) in gravel and
limestone."
Asphalt overlay, a resurfacing
process requiring the grinding out of
sore spots then covering with new
asphalt, is the only semi-permanent
repair, other than reconstructing the en-
tire road, that the county Road Com-
mission employs.
ALTHOUGH THESE methods have
been heavily criticized because they
are a symptomatic treatment rather
than a real solution to the problem, they
are the only practical approach, accor-
ding to Anderson.
"The best answer," Anderson said,
"would be to ask the state for more
money to resurface the bad roadways."

Currently the money for road repair
and improvement comes from the
vehicle highway fund which is com-
posed of gas tax revenues and license
plate dues. The allotment for each
county, calculated from a 1970 census,
is based 65 per cent on actual road
mileages and 35 per cent on population.
There is no federal money involved in
road maintenance work, according to
Anderson.
Getting their "share of complaints"
on road conditions from the generally
urban county, the Road Commission
repairs the problem spots according to
where the worst conditions exist, .not
according to traffic volumes. "For
most people out there," said Anderson,
"the worst road they have is probably,
as far as they're concerned the only
road they have.
"We attempt with the best of our
ability to address the whole system,"
Anderson said, "but because of the
glaring lack of funds, we program the
worst ones we have, and then go from
there."
MANN THEATRES
" ILA ET
MAPLE VILLAGE ISHOPPING (ENTER
M769.1300
ADMISSION
Adult $4.o0 No Posses on Weekends
Child $2.50
YOU'LL BELIEVE
A MAN CAN FLY
SUPERMAN
MARLON BRANDO
GENE HACKMAN
E L"UM 9r VWAWKRERR" 0 t F1
SHOWTIMES
Mon-FRI 7:00 9:45
SAT. & SUN.

1:30
4:15

7:00'
9:45

4:15 9:45

SHOWTIMES

MON.-FRI

1:00

SAT. & SUN
4:30

8:00
8:00

RVAfl

I
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ROMAN POLANSKI'S 1965
REPULSION
Polanski's first film in English has the inspired casting of
Catherine Deneuve as a fantasy befouled virgin torn between
her craving for and loathing of men. Very scary.
Mon: Walace Beery & Lewis Stone in
LOST WORLD (free at 7:00)
Monte Blue & Myrna Loy in
Lubitsch's SO THIS IS PARIS (free at 8:15)
Tues: Cukor's DAVID COPPERFIELD

CINEMA GUILD

TONIGHT AT
7:00 & 9:05

OLD ARCH. AUD.
$1.50

Ann rborPow-Wow
Sunday, Apri 8-1-5 pm
Cleary College Audiltorium
2170 WASHTENAW, corner of Hewitt St.-YPSILANTI
NATIVE AMERICAN DANCING

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