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April 05, 1979 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1979-04-05

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page8-Thursday,;April 5,1979-The Michigan Daily
Mental Health Research Institute Announces:
SEMINAR SPEAKER.
SEYMORE M. ANTELMAN
Fronm the University of Pittsburgh, Speaking on
"STRESS, DOPAMINE-RELATED BEHAVIORS"

FOURTH NETTER RETURNS FROM INDIANA:

Peter Osler home

0

-Ai

Room 1057

On Thursday, April 5,3:45
Mental Health Research Inst.
Tea at 3:15 in Lounge

By SCOTT M. LEWIS
When tennis player Pete Osler
graduated from AnnArborHuron High
in 1974, he didn't think he could break
into Michigan's awesome starting
lineup. So he opted for Indiana Univer-
sity, where he knew he would get a
chance to play regularly.
Five years and scores of victories
later, Osler has proven that he can in-
deed compete with the conference's

best-and for the past two years, the
wins have come as a Wolverine.
OSLER, A lanky lefthander who will
turn 23 a week from today, came on
strong last season to finish Big Ten
runner-up at number four singles. He
has returned to the fourth singles slot
this spring and carries a five-match
winning streak into tomorrow's contest
at Champaign.
After earning honors as southeastern

r
A A Ladies
came and get your
Bananas T-shirts
/
i
,
GO-BANANAS
SUNDAY AND MONDAY
3 .
h NIGHT!
..Announcing
_ Second Grand Opening :
Sunday, A pril 8th and Monday, A pril 9th
will be the Second Grand Opening ,
of the' most exciting Disco in town. If you thought
th e-past Bananas' was exciting come see the
NEW BANANAS.
Featuring * A new enlarged sound system i
i{ ** Records to your request
*Dancing in an exciting mistic fog
Make sure you See it. Hear it. Feel it. Love it. o
a m No Cover Sunday thru Thursday.s
28 0 0 J ackso n R o ad O~~~in g s----- d-r
An n Arbor anayApril |
I Friday or Saturday Night I
SwAdjacent to Ramada inn and get 2amittances
tust offa w-94as eifor the price of 1._-ceeh
U! / ! !i ! iii i ./// i/ -i Uii/ i

again, n
Michigan's top high school player
during his senior year at Huron, Osler
was faced with a dilemma. He could at-
tend Michigan, where the likes of Vic
Amaya, FreddierDeJesus, Peter'
Fleming and an influx of nationally-
ranked incoming freshmen would keep
him on the sidelines for at least a year.
Or he could depart from his native
Ann Arbor in hopes of gaining com-
petitive playing time. Osler chose the
latter, only to return to Michigan two
years later.
IN RETROSPECT, however, both he
and Blue coach Brian Eisner concur
that his decision was correct.
"When I was deciding where to go,"
said the fifth-year senior, "I looked at
the people who would be playing for
Michigan and didn't believe there was
much chance for me to play. It's hard to
sit around, wait and watch, yet still con-
tinue to improve. At Indiana, I could
play right away."
(In fact, Osler, playing third singles,
posted the best record on the team
while at Bloom in gton.)
EISNER SUPPORTS Osler's
decision today, just as he did five years
ago. "After Peter graduated from high
school, he made a great deal of im-
provement. He's always had tremen-
dous technical skills, but he graduated
the same year that I had one of my
strongest teams."~
Osler's reasons for choosing Indiana
were psychological as well as practical.
The 1974 freshman crop was nationally-
ranked, and he was not.' Twice he
qualified for the National Junior
Division Tournament, but heanever lan-
ded a U.S. ranking.
Confidence in his ability came
gradually for the introspective Osler,

61

aturauy
who plans' to maintain a family
tradition in architectural landscape
when he graduates. It was the lack of
confidence which caused him to steer
away from,Michigan; it was the "ar-
chitect" in him which dictated Osler's
return to Ann Arbor.
"MY HEART WAS in Michigan," he
said. "Actually, though, I came back
for academic reasons. The right cour-
ses (for my career goals) weren't of-
fered at Indiana. As I intend to go into
landscape, returning to Michigan was
to my advantage in all regards."
Osler's return to his home state im-
mediately paid dividends to the
Michigan team. Eisner marvels at how
much the "Wizard" (his teammates
call him the Wizard of Osler) has
progressed since his high school days.
"Peter has made unbelievable
progress here," beamed Eisner. "At
Indiana, he was in the lineup every day
and gained confidence in himself. Here,
the changes have been most obvious in
his greater court sense. He's developed
a sense of maturity, a court per-
sonality."
,If Osler were still playing for Indiana
right now, he would probably be
playing number one singles. But, that
doesn't really matter, said Osler.
"What position you play is not impor-
tant at all. In my own heart, I'm
satisfied with my play."
So is Eisner, who was well aware of
Osler's talents when he was playing for
the Hurons. "He played outstanding
tennis all year," said the coach. "He
has turned in the best performance on
the team based on his ability. In terms
of position-day-in, day-out-he's been
our most valuable player."

Daily Photo CYRENA CHANG
MICHIGAN SINGLES competitor Peter Osler prepares to hit a backhand return
as the Wolverines get ready for the opening of the Big Ten season this weekend.
Osler, owner of a 5 match winning streak, has been the men's most consistent

player so far this year.

$.

IMMEDIATE BESTSELLER!

Wolverines eat the snow bird. Yester-
day's home opener was cancelled
again. The cold weather and two inches
of snow forced the delay of Michigan's
baseball season, eliminating the
double-header with the Toledo Rockets.
The two teams will not meet this year
because the doubleheader at Toledo,
scheduled for last Tuesday, was also
cancelled.
Michigan will try to continue its
warm-up season tomorrow when
Bowling Green will be in town for a
double-header beginning at 2:00 in
Fisher Stadium.

Pool sharks shoot
in tourney at Un jo
By GARY LEVY
"Eight ball in the side pocket."
The name of the game is straight pool when the nation's top college
billiards players compete for the National Inter-Collegiate Billiards Cham-
pionships today through Saturday at the Michigan Union Ballroom.
Fifteen men and fifteen women earned berths in the championships by
winning their respective campus and regional tournaments.
Straight pool, or 14.1 continuous pocket billiards, is known as the game
of champions because of the many skills required.
"It's called the game of champions because, it requires an overall
knowledge of pocket billiards, said Richard Butchko, the number two seed in
the tournament. "It calls for a fine coordination of movements and a level of
concentration that other games don't call for."
The number one seed in the men's division is Jordan Fleetwood,
representing Wayne State. His chief competitors are Butchko (Duquesne),
.Peter Lhotka (North Dakota), and John Conners (San Jose State).
,,.,The'top women's seeding belongs to Julie Fitzpatrick, the 1977 national
champion representing Wisconsin. She will be challenged by the number two
seed and defending,1978 champion, Maridana Heyden from Oregon State.
Regularly scheduled matches for the double elimination tournament
begin today at 9:00 a.m. and runs through Saturday. The semifinals are
slated for 1:00 p.m. Saturday with the finals at 7:00 p.m: Admission is free.

"Does for Washington D.C.,
what Heller did for the
military in Catch 22"
-Tlme Magazine
Whether as the funniest and most acerbic American
political novel ever written ("An astounding vision
of our leaders in Washington"-N.Y Times Book
Review), or as the ultimate American-Jewish novel
("A savage, intemperately funny satire on the
assimilation of the Jewish tradition of liberal-
ism into the American main chance" -R.Z
S. Sheppard, Time), Joseph Heller's Good as Gold
(200,000 copiesin print) is being hailed as the novel
of the year.
- {
BY
eJOSEPH M
Main Selection of The Literary~ Guild $1295 SIMON AND SCHUISTER A

SECOND SEASON FOR NHL

Crowde
By JON WELLS
With six grueling months ofI
qualifying heats coming to a close this
week, the race is about to begin in thet
NHL. Showing dubious efficiency, ther
eighty-game regular season schedulei
has produced twelve teams deemedt
worthy of participation in the six-weekt
quest for the Stanley Cup. With only
five of the seventeen NHL teams ex-
cluded from playoff action, the term
"second season" has become a reality.
Any system that sends three teams
with losing records and an entire
division into the playoffs is necessarily
an intricate one.'
THE WINNERS, of each of the four
divisions automatically enter the
playoffs and receive byesin the first
round. The Montreal Canadiens, the
New York Islanders, the Boston Bruins
and the Chicago (27-35-15) Black Hawks
fall into this category.
The second place finishers in each
division, Philadelphia, Buffalo, Pit-
tsburgh and Vancouver also join in the
scrap for the Stanley Cup.
The final four spots are allotted to the
clubs with the highest point totals
throughout the league that finished in
third place or below. These wild card
berths will be occupied by the New
York Rangers, Atlanta, Toronto and

Los Angeles.
THE SECOND place and wild card
teams are then seeded in order of their
regular season point totals and proceed
into the best-of-three first round with
the first seed playing the eighth seed,
the second seed playing the seventh
seed, etc. The four survivors are once
again ranked according to regular
season points, this time with the four

fs begin

DIVISION WINNERS
W L
Montreal ..................50 16
N.Y. Islanders............. 48 15
Boston..................42 22
Chicago ................... 27 .35
2ND PLACE TEAMS
W L
Philadelphia.............. 39 23
Buffalo.................. 35 27
Pittsburgh............... 35 30
Vancouver ................ 24 42
WILD CARD TEAMS
W

T
11
14
13
15
T
15
15
13
12
T
10
7
12
11

Pts.
111
110
97
67
Pts.
93
85
83
60
Pts.
90
87
78
77

Cups making this, the second season,
an outstanding hockey spectacle.
ONCE AGAIN it appears that the
Canadiens are holding most of the car-
ds. The defending Stanley Cup cham-
pions, the dominant force in the league
for the last few years, possess a degree
of talent, depth, and playoff experience
that bodes ill for their challengers. The
defensive barricade created by Larry
Robinson, Guy LaPointe,Serge Savard,
and Ken Dryden coupled with an army
of fleet forwards led by Guy Lafluer
make this team a seemingly unstoppable
hockey machine.
The New York Islanders appear to be
holding any left-over cards as they have
surged to within one point of the high
and mighty Habs. Their forward line of
Mike Bossy,-Brian Trottier and Clark
Gilles is by far the most productive in
hockey this year and promises to propel
the Islanders deep into May hockey.
THE FIESTY Boston Bruins, in spite
of their relentless fore-checking and a
generally aggressive style of play, have
gone somewhat flat down the stretch.
Barring the untimely'demise of either
Montreal or the Islanders, a third con-
secutive appearance in the finals by the
Bostonians seems unlikely.
In addition to the powerful nucleus of
Montreal, Boston,' the Islanders, and
Philadelphia, the New York Rangers
and the Atlanta Flames have emerged
as legitimate cup contenders. Buffalo
and Toronto are tough as always but
have both lacked the consistency that
will be necessary to prevail in the
playoffs.
The first round of the playoffs are
scheduled to begin on April 10th.
There's a long and rocky road ahead of
the twelve NHL elites and don't be sur-
prised when the Vancouver Canucks
are left at the starting gate.

N.Y. Rangers ..............
Atlanta................
Toronto...............
Los Angeles.............

40 27
40 30
33 32
33 34

division winners who sat out the first
round.These teams clash in four best-of-
seven series with the winners moving
into the semi-finals.
The semi-final pairings, also deter-
mined by point totals, produce the two
finalists and the culmination of a
playoff extravaganza that includes
anywhere from 36 to 61 games.
In addition to an over-populated
playoff scene, the obvious inequities of
the NHL system have resulted in the in-
clusion of two teams, Chicago and Van-
couver, who, to say the least, are of
doubtful playoff caliber. In spite of all
this, there is a certain magic, a level of
energy, that is generated in the Stanley

-S
-t

You Can Avoid Leaving town for the summer?

Student Rush
kIo,. f mI I

Ask your Ann Arbor Bank and Trust teller to place your
checking account on no activity status.
No activity means no service charges while you are on
vacation.
In the fall your account will be reactivated automatically.
. - . . . - - 1 - -

CONTACT LENSES
snft and hard* contact lenses $210.00

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