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March 30, 1979 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1979-03-30

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The Michigan Daily-Friday, March 30, 1979-Page 3

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FYUSEE NE SPPnCALL DAL?
Get published quick
Chain letters promising participants lucrative returns have ear-
ned a rather dubious reputation, but enterprising college professors
have found a new approach to the old scam. The following letter recen-
tly was found drifting in a corridor of University faculty offices:
Dear Colleague,
I am sure that you are aware of the IMPORTANCE of
PUBLICATIONS in ESTABLISHING YOURSELF and PROCURING
GRANTS, AWARDS and "GOOD" PAYING ACADEMIC POSITIONS or
CHAIRMANSHIPS. I have devised a way in which your
CURRICULUM VITAE can be GREATLY ENHANCED with VERY
LITTLE EFFORT. Although this method could be viewed
as a slight digression in scientific professionalism,
I am sure you will find 'that the PROS far out number
the cons. If you are interested please follow these
directions:
a
Add the name at the top'of the list as an addi-
tional author on your next publication. Then remove
the name at the top of the list, move the individuals
up one and place YOUR NAME as #6 and send the revised
list to five of your colleagues with a copy of these
directions. j
Names
1. Dr. Marion Smart, Pepperdine University
2. Mr. Seymour Gertz, Department of Etiology, University
of California, Berkley
3. Dr. Myron Gofer, University Southwestern Rhode Island
4. Dr. Otto Klosett, Department of Redundancy School,
University of Michigan
5. Ms. Eileen 4ouer, Wayne State University
6. Dr. Ima S. Seiker, University of Dayton
Since we have just initiated this letter by sending
it to you and four others, the number of PUBLICATIONS
each individual will gain are #1-5, #2-25, #3-125, #4-625,
#5-3,125, #6 YOU-15,625. As you can see, 15,625 PUBLICA-.
TIONS for including JUST ONE on one of your publications.
If you do not wish to participate in this ONCE IN A
LIFETIME OPPORTUNITY please forward this letter to one
of your colleagues.
Groups go legit
After having their status as student organizations suspended by
the Michigan Student Assembly (MSA) for failing to account for fall
term fund allocations, the following groups have cleared their good
names by cooperating with MSA: The People's Action Coalition
(PAC), the Washtenaw County Coalition Against Apartheid, Save
University Dining Systems (SUDS), Free China Day, Friends of Arbor
Alliance, Ann Arbor Committee for Human Rights in Latin America,
Council for Exceptional Children, the Rowing Club, Michigan Technic,
Association for the Advancement of Appropriate Technology for
Developing Countries, University Jazz Band, and the Samoff Student
Support Committee. Eleven of the 23 groups originally suspended have
yet to clear up their reputation, including the Ann Arbor Assassination
Information Bureau.
Take ten
The.two candidates for Ann Arbor mayor in 1969, both University
profesifs debated party politics on March 30, 1969. Prof. Robert
Harriisnthe Democrat and still an adjunct professor of Law and
Political Science, on the evening of March 30,' 1969 claimed the
Republican party in the city was "too sympathetic to the speculators
and too cool to the public interest." Prof. Richard Balzhiser denied the
charge and stated that the broad political spectrum of the GOP in the
city insured complete representation of all interests in the community.
Happen ings
FILMS
A-V Services - The Curb Between Us; Aud. SPH II, 12:10 p.m.
Cinema II - animation night: Aud. A, Angell Hall, 7, 9p.m.
Mediatrics - Cat and Mouse; Nat. Sci., 7,8:45, 10:30 p.m.
AAFC - I'm All Right Jack; A Shot in the Dark, 9, MLB 3.
Gargoyle - Hitchcock's Spellbound; 100 Hutchins Hall, 7, 9:15
p.m.
SPEAKERS
Guild House - Joel Samoff, Pol. Science: "Academic Freedom
and Radical Faculty," 802 Monroe, soup and sandwich, 75t.
Center for Western European Studies - Howard Segal, asst. Prof.
of Humanities in Engineering College; "Western Technology and
Visions of Utopia," Michigan League Conference room, noon. Call 764-
4311 for info. f
Tanner Lecture Program - Edward Wilson,tHarvard University,
"Comparative Social Theory," Rackham Lecture Hall, 8:30 a.m.;
Stuart Altmann, Prof. of Biology and anatomy, University of Chicago,
"The Relevance of Irrelevance of Animal Behavior to Human Con-

duct," 9:30 a.m.; Alexander Alland, anthropology professor, Colum-
bia University, "Human Genetics, Sociobiology, and Culture," around
10:30 a.m.; and John Searle, philosophy professor, University of
California-Berkeley, "Sociobiology and Ethics," 1:30 p.m.
Astronomy Visitor's Night - Bradley Whitmore, "Islands of the
Galaxies," Realm of Galaxies, Aud. B Angell Hall, 8:30 p.m.
PERFORMANCES
Seligson Players - Plautus' "Pot of Gold," foyer, Angell 8 p.m.
UAC - Bob Duffner, "An Evening of TV trivia," Union Ballroom,
8 p.m.
Poetry Workshop - William Stafford, reading; Pendleton Center,
Union, 8 p.m.
. Music School Dance Dept. - Sr. Dance Concert: Studio A, Dance
Bldg., 8p.m.
Chicano Theatre - "Hijos," SEB, 8 p.m.
Canterbury Loft - "Teatro Venceremos," 332 S. State, 8 p.m.
Based on Chicano student life after the Bakke decision.
Michifish Swim Show - "In Search of ...": Bell Pool, 8:15 p.m.
Music School/Musical Society - Benny Goodman has cancelled
his appearance due to illness. The concert has been rescheduled for
April 11 with soprano Eileen Farrell.
Ark - Gamble Rogers, guitarist, storyteller, 1421 Hill, 9 p.m.
Halfway Inn - Anatates, jazz concert; basement E. Quad, 9 p.m.
MISCELLANEOUS
Diag rally at noon for Democratic mayoral candidate James
Kenworthy featuring folk singer Martha Burns, State Senator Edward
Pierce,rand State Senator Perry Bullard. Sponsored by Students for
Kenworthy.
Project OUTREACH - Fall '79 applications being accepted. Call
764-9179 or stop by 554 Thompson.
Art Show - Horace Rackham Gallery, 11 a.m.-4 p.m.
Black Psychology Symposium - "After Graduation, What? Ex-
ploring Roles and Values of Black Psychologists," Rackham Assem-
bly Hall, 9-5 p.m. Sponsored by Psychology Dept. and Black Student
Psychological Association.
Filipino Night - University Club in Michigan Union, 9:30 p.m.-
1:30a.m.
World Symposium on Humanity - University of Detroit's Student
Union, students free. Call Joe Barkat 964-6950.

Rec. Sports
proposes
Fuller Field.
development
By STEVE HOOK
The University's Department of
Recreational Sports last Friday
proposed the first phase of a $500,000
development project for the Fuller
Field area, which the department says
is vital to the future of intramural and
club sports programs.
Michael Stevenson, associate direc-
tor of Recreational Sports proposed in
Phase I of the plan renovation of the
grounds, including the construction of
an irrigation system, six limestone sof-
tball infields, and six permanent
backstops. Estimated cost of Phase I is
$150,000, according to Stevenson.
Approval of the project from the
Plant Extension Committee, which
makes decisions on renovation or con-
struction of all University properties, is
expected in the next several weeks. The
committee includes executive officers
of the University and other personnel.
The Department of Recreational
Sports is committed to provide half of
the funds for the proposed develop-
ment. Stevenson said the department is
willing to accept half the costs because
it will receive revenues from user pass
admissions to campus buildings, locker
and equipment rentals, and other sour-
ces.
Stevenson expressed "cautious op-
timism" that the remaining funds
needed - which will come from the
University's general fund - can be
made available to the department.
Stevenson said work has already
begun on arranging Phase I funding. If
the program does receive sufficient
funding, Stevenson hopes it could be
completed by fall.
Phase II of the development project
calls for lighting of the field, which
would "allow for greater flexibility and
efficiency in scheduling," according to
Stevenson. Explaining that there are
only four lighted football fields, and two
softball diamonds, Stevenson said
many students are unable to par-
ticipate in sports during the day, and
the lack of available facilities at night
exclude them altogether.
In addition, Stevenson said the depar-
tment has been under increased
pressure from sports clubs demanding
more practice facilities at night. The
proposed lighting of Fuller Field would
cost an estimated$300,000.
Phase III provides for a service
building to be constructed. The service
building would house an administrative
office, lavatory, and storage facilities.
A jogging track would also be built
around the entire field.
Stevenson said these projects would
all depend on funding and University
support.
He noted that the lighting proposal
would be the "most controversial,"
because interested people will "cer-
tainly have questions'' about this
aspect of the development. Two issues,
the aesthetic concerns over proposed
lighting and other energy con-
siderations.
"Both questions can be addressed,"
Stevenson said. "We are optimistic that
the need for more lighted field space
can be shown, and there are
technological means to deal with the
energy and artistic concerns in an ef-

fective way."
Assistant Athletic Director Charles
Harris confirmed that the proposals are
being considered. "Rumors are, and
they are just rumors," Harris said,
"that they'll probably get money to do
something, but I don't know what."
BOOKS STOLEN
DURHAM, England (AP)-Twenty-.
one rare books were stolen recently
from the University of Durham.
Described as priceless, the earliest
book was dated 1563.
Some People
Want the Best
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~,z WA -
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