100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

March 29, 1979 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1979-03-29

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

POETRY READING
with
LAURIE LESSEN
DANA RICKER and CARRIES SMITH
Reading from their works
Thursday, March 29-7:30 p.m.
GUILD HOUSE-S02 Monroe
ADMISSION FREE
THE YPSI-ARBOR BLACK MUSIC FESTVAL
Presents an Evening of Gospel Music
"A GOSPEL JAMBOREE'
FRI., MARCH 30- 7:30 p.m. FREE
IGBLE CHURCH, 2146 MOELLER, YPSI.
Tse Bible Church Choir and other area choirs will trace the
development of Black Gospel music from slavery to the
present. For more information call 487-5500
[fNIVENWTY ILMSICAL8OCIETY presents

Page 6-Thursday, March 29, 1979-The Michigan Daily
Kimberly Woods is

,/

Soviet attempts defection,
triggers bomb in Embassy

problem for Senunas

(Continued from Page 1)
borhood) that Senunas has not
represented us well at all, and this cuts
across political lines," Grapentine said.
This dissatisfaction was specifically
the product of two recent Council votes
- annexing the area from Pittsfield
Township to Ann Arbor and changing
the zoning to allow a higher density of
family housing.
Both votes, the association believed,
hurt its bargaining position with the
developer and chances for a com-
promise. Senunas says the zoning vote
was the point when "the neighborhood
turned against us (Senunas and fellow
Republican Third Ward Councilman
Cliff Sheldon) - like (we were) traitors
to the cause." Senunas disagrees that
either vote represented "a club" which
the council had surrendered.
The Kimberly nature preserve brings
attention to what is a central concern of
this large, sprawling ward and an issue
Faust repeatedly raises - the need for
planned development. The ward -
stretching east from Nixon Rd. running
to U.S. 23, and bounded roughly by
Packard Rd. and the Huron River - is
recognized as one of the last "un-
developed" areas of the city. The inten-
sity with which the Kimberly residents
sought to resist the destruction of
remaining natural areas attests to their
aa1Zi*Blues
5th ANNIVERSARY CONCERT'
TuesdaV April 3
Tuk.A§ $z
U;-L

fears of what "development" may
bring.
Faust attacks the Republicans'
treatment of Kimberly preserve as
proof of the "need for better understan-
ding of neighborhood and sensitivity to
people, not to the planners." To accom-
plish this citizen responsiveness, Faust
stresses more community involvement
early in planning.
,Senunas, an engineer at Ford Motor
Company, emphasizes continuing the
road repair program and efforts to im-
prove the city's financial position.
Court ruling
preserves
five acres
of Kimberly
(Continued from Page 1)
side the city. "This is an important day
for several groups of people who have
fought these fights in the past and will
in the future. Developers must take
heed of what's happening and address
environmental issues."
Robert Henry, the attorney for the
Dions, indicated that they haven't had a
chance to react to the decision yet and
had no further comments.
Under pressure from the neighbors,
the city had offered to buy basically the
same land set aside in the judge's
decision, but Dions had not accepted
the offer. Due to the decision, the Dions
lose the option of financial compen-
sation for that portion of their land sin-
ce it is permanently being set aside.
.~ SPECIAL
I. . ATTRACTIONS Presents
An All Professional Cast in

By AP and Reuter
MOSCOW (AP) - A young Soviet
seaman - who said he "hated
Brezhnev" and wanted to go to
America - holed up in the U.S. Em-
bassy for eight hours yesterday, then
exploded a bomb strapped to his waist
when a group of Russians tried to force
him out, U.S. Ambassador Malcolm
Toon announced.
The 27-year-old sailor, who has not
yet been named, was dead on arrival at
a central Moscow hospital where he
was taken after blowing himself up in
the consular section of the mission, a
hospital spokesman said.
BRIEFING reporters after the eight-
hour drama, Toon said the man
revealed the bomb in the early after-
noon after beginning an interview with
a consular officer about his wish to
emigrate.
Informed sources said he threatened
to pull a pin from the grey metal box
containing the explosive unless he
received an assurance that he could
leave the Soviet Union for the United

States.
The Russian raid was organized with
American approval. Toon said there
was no breach of security and, "since it
was apparent that the man was un-
balanced, and since he appeared in our
view to represent a threat to the safety
of American personnel and property,
and since he was a Soviet citizen, we
called upon the Soviet authorities for
help."
THE AMBASSADOR said he believed
it was unprecedented for American of-
ficials to give Soviets free rein to carry
out an operation of this kind in the U.S.
Embassy, but the Russians were in-
vited "to handle it as they saw fit."
Several hours after the seaman en-
tered the embassy, four loud explosions
described as tear gas canisters being
fired were heard outside the embassy,
the apparent start of an attempt to seize
the youth.
The unidentified Soviet had last been
reported negotiating with a high-
ranking Soviet official and the embassy
security chief.

Bursley residents pull the
plug on energy misuse

By PATRICIA HAGEN

Hey ou;Good tookin
Allow me to introduce myself.
1 am
TELEPHONE.
Cal Billing 764-0550
Circulation 764-0558
Classifieds 764-0557
Display 764-0554
News 764-0552
Sports 764-0562
****************************** **

A
L
B
B
B
D
I
R
B
C
T
S

i

upa
em
The American Dream de
thi
& de
T
Ili 60 0 idoi
The Zoo Storydo
May
5 p wit
ea
res
830 p.m.re
Ma
Listening clv
mil
& enc
j & con
- am
Counting The Ways to
ran
to
All Four One-Acts Written and Fl
Directed By Edward Albee. sti4

Bursley residents have been making
pecial effort for the past four weeks
keep windows and curtains closed at
ht, lights turned off in the bathrooms
I the doors at the end of the halls
>sed to earn points in an energy-
ving contest between the halls in the
rmitory.
The men of third floor Lewis House
I the best job of conserving energy
d were awarded $75 for their
ergetic efforts.
'HE CONTEST was conducted by a
ique class at Bursley. The class, en-
ed The Housing Energy Problem,
s jointly sponsored by the School of
tural Resources and the Office of
)using. 417 students registered for the
urse.
The class, offered for two credits, the
st of its kind in the country, isbased
on the "idea of approaching the
ergy problem through group in-
pendent study," explained Bill Chiet,
ching assistant for the course. "I
nk it's been very successful," he ad-
d.
The efforts of the class will provide a
odel for future energy projects in the
rms, according to Housing Energy
inager George SanFacon.
THE CLASS publicized the contest
th posters and information sent to
ch resident arld resident advisor. The
idents had a "generally positive
action" to the contest, according to
ary Jo Flaherty, a sophomore in the
ss.
WHile official results can't be deter-
ned until the meters are read at the
d of the month, and figures can be
mpared with last month's, the class
d housing officials expect the savings
be significant. .
The contest also could have long-
nge effects. "We're hoping it will lead
behavior change in residents," said
aherty, "We're hoping some of it will
ick."
RESIDENTS were also encouraged
take shorter showers, use stairs in-
bad of elevators, and use fluorescent
stead of incandescent lights.'
A booklet explaining how residents
rn regulate the heat in their own
oms was written and distributed by
eclass. The booklet is having a
sitive effect, and maintenance is get-
g requests from students to - fix
gulators that they discovered were
oken, said Chiet.
Despite the problem of recruiting
ident volunteers and the low priority
conservation with staff and students,
cent efforts at saving energy have,
pwn some success. "So far a lot of -the
sults. are due to the student par-
ipation that we have got," said San-
con.
THIS YEAR energy conservation
ograms directed towards resident
vareness have been attempted by
iff and students in several of the
sidence halls..
"This is the first year we've been
ven charge to start a program," said
arkley Building- Director Leroy
illiams. "We are showing a

significant savings," he added.
Lighting consumption has been reduced
ten per cent in Markley, he said.
A committee in Markley was
established, signs were put up and
results were posted to encourage
resident participation. These efforts
were effective, Williams said, and
"they are beginning to turn off lights,"
said Williams.
IN OXFORD Housing and Mosher-
Jordan, an energy council has been en-
couraging heat reduction in the rooms,
and electricity usage at Oxford has
been cut back ten per cent, said San-
Facon.
Next year SanFacon hopes to create a
new Building Energy Committee with
staff and student members in each of
the residence halls. The tentative goal
of each committee will be to cut elec-
trical, water and sewerage usage by ten
per cent and heating by five per cent. If
this goal is reached in each dormitory
the total savings would be $150,000.
The office of Housing published the
Residence Hall Energy Conservation
Guidebook earlier this month. "It's a
practical, how-to, guidebook to get
residents and staff to conserve energy
in a residence hall," said SanFacon.
THE NEW handbook contains direc-
tions for establishing a committee in
each dormitory with representatives
from food service, maintenance,
security, housekeeping, resident staff
and residents. Specific guidelines are
included to help each department
reduce energy usage. SanFacon said
"Staff participation will be
critical to unlocking student par-
ticipation," he said.
SanFacon outlined other efforts
Housing has made and mentioned some
future plans. Surveys of lighting,
heating, exhaust, and ventilation
systems and consumption levels have
been conducted, said SanFacon. The
surveys will be "the foundation of a
more comprehensive and systematic
preventive maintenance program."
There has been an on-going campaign
to switch from incandescent to
fluorescent lighting where ever
possible.
A $4.98 MILLION federal loan from
the Department of Housing and Urban
Development (HUD) will finance the
installation of double paned windows
and more roof insulation in many dor-
mitories by the summer of 1980, pen-
ding University approval, explained
SanFacon.
Creating incentives for student and
staff participation is a significant
problem for housing officials. The Bur-
sley contest was an experiment to test
student reaction to a contest and
determine its effectiveness as an
energy-saver. But, SanFacon said they
haven't come up with a successful
system of rewards. He cited the
problems of monitoring hall versus hall
contests and the short duration of con-
test efforts.
WHile savings can't be passed on
directly to students, spiraling room and
board rates may not increase as
quickly, said SanFacon.

A
L

MARCH 31--POWER CENTER
SPECIAL OFFERI! Buy First Show-
Get Second Shaw % PRICE1I
TICKETS $4-$$
Available at PTP Ticket Office in
the Michigan League, from 10-1
and from 2.5 p.m., and at aill J.L.
Hudson's stores. Information: 764-
0450

March 28-31

Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre
; IA9mwto
rM

I

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan