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March 29, 1979 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1979-03-29

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

LSA-SG to
back Cobb
as president
By BETH PERSKY
Literary College Student Govern-
ment (LSA-SG) passed at last night's
meeting a resolution urging the Regen-
ts to appoint Dr. Jewell Cobb-a former
candidate for the position of Literary
School Dean-to the position of
President of the University.
Also approved was a letter written by
Bob Stechuk, LSA-SG President,
stating LSA-SG's opposition to a
pr6posed curriculum change that would
eliminate the Graduate Teaching
Assistants (TAs) at all 300-level and
above courses.
LSA-SG IS opposed to eliminating the
TAs because it would abolish minority-
oriented courses-such as Women's
Studies, American Studies, and Afro-
American Studies-for the reason that
only Graduate Teaching Assistants are
willing and able to teach such courses.
Stechuk claimed that students were
denied input in the decision. "The
policy to exclude TAs was initiated
*without input from the curriculum
committee," said Stechuk. The
curriculum committee isecomposed of
both students and faculty, and the
decision was made by faculty alone,
Stechuk said.

The Michigan Daily-Thursday, March 29, 1979-Page 5
FREAKED ABOUT FINALS?
Do You Fear
-freezing or blanking on exams?
-not being able to concentrate on studying 'cause you're
scared?
-not enough time to get everything done?
If Yes, Attend On
Tuesday, April 3, 7:00-9:30
THE
Preparinfor Fina ls$Workshop
offered by
The Peer Counselors In Academic Anxiety
Reduction of Counseling Services
LEARN
-relaxation techniques
-strategies to efficiently manage remaining time for
papers, exams, projects
-coping with the pressure of finals.
REGISTER NOW!
For further information, location & to sign up, come to the
University Counseling Services, 3rd floor Michigan Union.
764-8312.

Daily Photo by ANDY FREEBERG
REPUBLICAN MAYOR Louis Belcher (left) and Democratic Mayoral challenger James Kenworthy (right) leaned back in
their chairs as they discussed at length Ann Arbor's budget deficit and housing problems in yesterday's debate at the Daily's
offices. Ann Arbor voters will go to the polls April 2 to choose one of the two men to be the city's next mayor.
Candidates tangle on fiscal issues

By ELISA ISAACSON
Yesterday's mayoral candidates'
debate at the Daily offices underlined
some of the differences and similarities
between the two contenders as they
tackled in more detail than in previous
debates issues such as the city's fiscal
situation and the housing squeeze.
It might seem -to those listening to
Republican incumbent Mayor Louis
Belcher and former Democratic Fourth
Ward Councilman James Kenworthy
discuss the city's budget that Ann Ar-

bor has a split personality. According to
Belcher, the city had a $522,000 surplus
at the beginning of the last fiscal year,
and should end up with an extra
$310,000-to-$450,000 at the close of this
year.
KENWORTHY, however, insists that
the city is now operating on a deficit of
$200,000.
The two candidates evidently used
different dictionaries in their analyses
of surplus and deficit.. The money to

PAC members committed
to progressive platform

which Belcher is referring to is surplus
from previous years, taken out of the
city's bank account and added to the
budget. Kenworthy's $200,000 is money
spent last year that exceeded that
year's revenues.
The candidates are at opposite poles
in their philosophies of what constitutes
a healthy budget. Belcher declared
firmly that he thinks the city is in "good
fiscal condition," and justified the use
of prior year surplus funds by saying
"government should not be in business
to have large surpluses." A great sur-
plus, the mayor said, is an indication
that the city's taxes are too high.
BELCHER said the city's current
contingency budget is approximately
$15,000. The mayor said he does not see
reason to "tie up" money in a general
emergency fund.
Kenworthy countered by saying he
feels the city's financial health is on the
decline due to excess spending. Accor-
ding to Kenworthy, spending more in a
given year than was taken in that same
year is detrimental to the city's fiscal
stability.
But when addressing the issue of
housing - an issue tackled by the
Coalition for Better Housing's fictitious
mayoral candidate, Louise Fairperson
- Belcher and Kenworthy both agreed
there is a need for increased construc-
tign.

RE-EL ECT
KEN LATTA
DEMOCRAT
TO CITY COUNCIL
Paid for by the
Latta for Council Committee
604 Indianola Dr., Ann Arbor, MI 48105
FIRST WARD
VOTE MONDAY, APRIL 2
A PROVEN RECORD OF
PEOPLE-ORIENTED PRIORITIES

_,Continued from Paee i)
most issues, McClenney, who is not on
the current Assembly, said, "There is a
good difference in the perspectives of
PAC people. There's just a commit-
ment to common goals."
"We have energy, new fresh blood,
and organizational expertise necessary
for careful planning," said current
MSA member Pelava, a senior in
Natural Resources. "We have com-
mitment and we have vision."
PAC PARTY members are concer-
ned with what they call the lack of
democracy in the University, and
although their resources are inherently
limited, said their plans for more
democracy within the University com-
munity would help them be better ad-
vocates and provide more services for
students.
According to McClenney, a junior in
Literature, Science and Arts, one of the
critical aspects of the goal for greater
democracy would be to research plans
thoroughly, and then present them to
administrators and legislators in a con-
vincing manner.
They also see long-range goals as
necessary to Assembly planning, and,
say they will consider what will be im-
portant in the University several years
off in their decisions and projects.
PELAVA, FOR example, has
initiated a student research project
through MSA and hopes to not only get
more students interested in student
government, but also help MSA find out
what students are interested In, along
with researching University issues.
"Students are apolitical for a
reason," McClenney said. "It's impor-
tant that MSA channel its energy into
finding out why." Both candidates feel
this student research project will help
them to combat student apathy.
"We have an advocacy, education,
and communication goal," Pelava said.
"We can't become a center for
bureaucrats." He feels that to get
students interested, MSA must become
a resource for students to use.
THE GROUP is also concerned about
the links between the quality of
education and increasing tuition costs.
"You aren't getting what you're paying
for," McClenney said. "If students
could see an increase in the quality of
education when a tuition increase
comes along it would be different. The
University doesn't spend enough money
on giving people a good education."
They advocate a state student lobby
to deal with student issues such as

rising costs, and are also concerned
with improving the quality of education
through student involvement in tenure
decisions, along with working to change
the way Regents are selected by
working throughtheDemocratic and
Republican parties.
Other issues which concern PAC are
University investment policies in South
Africa, improving the way admissions,
affirmative action, and attrition are
handled; capital improvements on
campus; improving the experience for
freshpersons and sophomores; helping
Career Planning and Placement reach
out to more students; and various
housing issues.

HOUSING
FINANCIAL AID

" DOWNTOWN
REVITALIZATION

"Students single-handedly can elect the next mayor and council of this city."

VOICES AND VISIONS:
asian AmeriCans in the Creative Arts
Workshops: Media, Literature, Music, and Asian American Identity
Guest Artists:
* GEORGE TAKEI-Well Known Film and T.V. Actor, Better Known as
Star Trek's Mr. Sulu
* MOMOKO IKO-Novelist, Poet, and Playwright, Author of the Play,
Gold Watch
* NOBUKO MIYAMOTO & BENNY YEE-Leading Asian Ameri-
can Jazz/Folk Musicians
" DAVID LOUIE-Assistant News Director of WXYZ TV
SATURDAY, MARCH 31
Michigan Union, Pendleton Room
9 am-5:30 pm $1 for students
FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CALL 764-5248
Sponsors: USA, LSA-SG, Rackham-SG, UAC, Minority Student Services, Community Services, Housing
Special Projects, VP-Office of Student Services, Asian A merican Association and IBM.
The Rudolf Steiner Institute
of the Great Lakes Area Presents:
REINCARNATON IN GREEK MYTHOLOGY
Saturday, March 31, 1979-8:00 p.m.
AND
THE COSMIC ORIGIN OF LANGUAGE
Sunday, April 1, 1979-3:00 p.m.
by PROFESSOR L. HEIRMAN
NORTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY
AT
RUDOLF STEINER HOUSE
1923 GEDDES AVENUE
ANN ARBOR
I

Student Newspaper at The University of Michigan
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Mail with Check to: Classified, The Michigan Daily

THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
The 19 78- 79 Tanner Lecture Program.
The Tanner Lecture on Human Values:
EDWARD 0. WILSON
Baird Professor of Science, Harvard University
"COMPARATIVE SOCIAL THEORY"
FRIDAY, March 30, 8:30 pm, Lecture Hall, Rackham Building

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