100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

March 25, 1979 - Image 9

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1979-03-25

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

NOW leader: ERA will

(Continued from Page 1
desses for Women's Rights, said,
"Women will have to trade something
with those states which have voted
against it in order to have them ratify
it. They have to trade power and
women don't have any, so we need
women to get involved in politics."
IN ADDITION, Frost-Welmers main-
tained that if women continue to stay on
the same path toward the ratification of
the amendment, then ERA won't
become the 27th amendment to the
Constitution.
"Those who support it are almost
afraid to talk about it and we have to be
able to move in an aggressive posture
to be able to pass it," she explained.
Part of Frost-Welmer's aggressive
approach includes a massive outreach
program, or "footwork" as she calls it.
"We want to make literature drops to
all citizens in the state and we want to
put paid organizers in those states
which haven't ratified the amen-
dment."
Frost-Welmers stressed that women
must reach out to people who don't un-
derstand the ERA. "If we want the

ERA to pass,we have to get the word
out. You can give a day, an hour, a
dollar, or anything, but we need the4
help to get it ratified."
Also on the program was Sandra
Guernsey, who joined Michigan's
Department of Labor Industrial
Relations staff in 1977. She said that
women's work is traditionally under-
valued and women must be moved into
non-traditional jobs and should be more
active participants in labor unions.
ACCORDING TO Guernsey, a com-'
mon means of covering up wage
discrimination between the sexes is to
give women titles which differ from
men even though their work is substan-
tially similar.
"We must combat the discrimination
by having equal pay for work of equal
value and central to this is the concept
of comparable worth, which incor-
porates the dimensions of job
evaluation and job compensation," ex-
plained Guernsey.,
The economic position for women still
looks grim, though, according to Lydia
Fisher, an economist for the UAW.
"President Carter's 1980 budget is bad

economics. Defense spending has been
increased while there has been a cut in
social spending and this is especially
bad for women," she said.
FISHER CLAIMS that Carter's cut-
backs will effect, among other things,
housing. "Most of the money the gover-
nment spends on housing goes to the
low-income group and the seven per cent
reduction in the proposed budget will
effect mostly female-headed and

elp
elderly househol
In addition, F
downplays the f
is widespread an
"Carter's res
stop unemploym
and the groups
high rates of u
stance, women,
hurt," explained
With Carter'sI

The Michigan Daily-Sunday, March 25, 1979-Page 9
homemaker
Ids." a proposed reduction in social security
fisher said, the budget benefits. "The administration will
act that unemployment eliminate lump sum death benefits and
ad incredibly high. women are more often the surviving
trictive policies won't spouse, so they won't receive the
lent but will increase it, benefit," said Fisher.
that have traditional Fisher said the best thing women can
unemployment, for in- do is to help make Congress aware of
are the first to get the inadequacies in the proposed
I Fisher. budget, because she hasn't seen any in-
guidelines, there is also dication that the clientele for these
programs has diminished.

aMaiz iiiBlie
5th ANVRAYCONCERT'
ThesdW April 3
Pone' HghSch.o. A iiton nm, Spi
Ticketns $2.,50 Ad:i, $2 Student. Goup Rates. Call
764-0384. Alumi A:. r,s -:ii~ . Mich. Unonn
994-2189. Pwin- " t l M i T-;t.
U o M s'+: t

Career Fair stresses
future job market

V

hh

Wha ji'S N

Ypsi State employees say
hospital is unsanitary

(Continued from Page 1)
ding workshops, which were divided in-
to four sessions and covered such topics
as Career Planning, Resume Writing,
Careers in Politics, and Job Hunting
Strategies.
SOME OF THE workshops were so
popular that women had to jam in the
doorways to listen to what was going on
inside. Becky Head, a Rackham
student who has a teaching degree and
has returned to the University to study
Environmental Health, said she
thought the Career Fair was a success.
"I think a lot of women don't think
about their career goals-the emphasis
that we're all going to be working.
Women have to see work as a real part
of their lives. I think it's important for
women to see so many role models,"
she said.
Other participants said they came to
"check out" different careers. One 65
year-old woman complained that there
weren't any programs for women over
the age of 50. She said she thought the

fair on the whole was "very good, but
they left out this part. There are many
older people who are in desperate need,
financially."
MAUREEN O'ROURKE, Chair-
woman of the Fair committee and the
Unviersity's Woman's Program Coor-
dinator, commented, "Some women
will be disappointed. Given it is our
third year we're trying to make this
meet so many different needs of
women. Overall it's been successful.
We've given women some sense of
what's going on and some sense of
where to go after this."
The Career Fair was free and
evaluation forms were given out so the
coordinators of next year's fair will
know how to make it more successful.
The fair was sponsored by a number
pf campus organizations, including the
Affirmative Action Programs, Career
Planning and Placement, Commission
for Women, Office of the Dean, School
of Medicine, and the Office of Student
Development and Activities.

atthe Paper Chase
Introducing our new 9400,
2-sided duplicating system]
Michigan Union open 7 days a week
till l0 p.m. 665-8065

YPSILANTI (UPI) - An employees
group at Ypsilanti State Hospital has
charged the hospital's kitchen facilities
are so filthy that roaches sometimes
fall into patients' food and maggots
cover the floor.
When told of the cdmplaints, Walter
Kenzie, director of the 1,000-bed mental
health facility, said he would look into
the charges Monday "to see if they
have substance."
THE 25 HOSPITAL employees made
the charges at a meeting Friday night.
"When we are fixing the patients'
meals, roaches come falling out of the
ceiling and drop into the food," said
Chris Prajzner, a cook's helper at the
facility.
Another employee, Harvey Beavers,
said the roaches, "are of astronomical
size. The kitchen is their home. The
patients call it, 'the roach coach'."
WORKERS COMPLAINED that gar-
bage and debris accumulated under the
floor of the kitchen, where there is no
foundation, and developed a stench in
~the summer.
"If these conditions exist, we will
take immediate steps to correct them,"
Kenzie said.4
But Kenzie, said he had "no inkling"

of bad conditions and said employees
had never complained directly to him.
KENZIE SAID the roach problem
was kept under control by spraying
with pesticides. But employees said the
pesticides sometimes tainted patients'
food and kitchen workers complained of
headaches from breathing the spray.
They said milk was often re-used af-
ter sitting unrefrigerated for hours,
prompting complaints by patients that
the milk was sour.
The employees produced four recent
reports by the hospital's infectious con-
trol committee which cited dirty con-
ditions, bad odors and poor food
storage.
ISLAND
HOUSE
HOTEL
Mackinaw Island, MI
ON CAMPUS
INTERVIEWS
MAR. 27-28
STUDENT
ACTIVITIES BLDG.

NOTICE
NON-NATIVE SPEAKERS OF ENGLISH
All speakers of English as a second langua ge* are invited to
take part in an experimental test of English language profi-
ciency to be given in ANGELL HALL AT 7:00 P.M. ON MARCH
26 AND 27.
You will receive $7.00 for approximately 1/ hours of your
time. In addition, test results will be made available to par-
ticipants. If interested you must call and register which night
you wish to take the test at the following number:
764-2413
*NO EGl students currently enrolled in the Intensive English courses are
eligible for the test.

SCIENTIFIC

INGENUITY

AT

A

SPECIAL

LOW

PRICE

5
-. . , r

I

t

I'

DON T
DELAY-

THIS
PRICE

'

This slim scienhfic iquid crystal calcu
lator can make fast work of the most in
volved math problem, and with the
leatherette case, you can take it anywhere
Trig and inverse functions.
Standard deviation (0,.(-n-1)
Parenthesis
Factorials
Scientific Notation +/-99 power
Degree, Radian, Gradian modes
Power extract (x1)
Deg-MinSec decimal (o' q
Leatherette notebook /wallet.
Dmensions-23/4" W X478" L S/i" H
Weight-2.7 ounces

DROP IS
TEMPORARY!
FX- 2500
LIST PRICE
$29w95
OUR PRICE
NOW $ 23.75

OUR
EXCLUSIVE
WARRANTY
SUPPORT
U-Cellar warranty support for
CASIO includes a 30 day over-
the-counter exchange on defec-
tive merchandise for a new
calculator of the same model.
For all calculators we will handle
the servicing for the full year
warranty period and give you a
loaner while yours is being re-
paired. All models are on dis-
play for your tinkering con-
venience.

... OR
IF YOU
HAVE
SOME-
THING
SMALLER
IN MIND:
Exceptionally slim, too Only 1/8
thick.
At
F X -48 tio
LIST PRICE
939.95
OUR PRICE
$34.00

cr.edit-card sized slide rule with 31 func-
ns, Casio's FX-48 Math Card fits in you
cket and goes an ywhere easily
"r) " and inverse functions.
rtandard Deviation. ('n,, dr-1)
arenthesis.
Degree, Radian, Gradian Modes.
Factorials.
Scientific Notation +/-99 power
Deg-Min-Sec Decimal (o"')
Weighs 1.6 oz.
Battery life-*1,000-hours.
Only 1/8" H X 31/2" W x 21/9".D

4

®

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan