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March 25, 1979 - Image 7

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1979-03-25

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The Michigan Daily-Sunday, March 25, 1978-Page 7
arts & entertainment
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IvFSITY cMUSICAL+OCIETY -'resent
Benny Goodman
t'niversit%, .S-,-mphoiiv Orchestra
(;ustav Meter, Conductor
at the
Fifth Annuo 1Benefit Concert
The 'King of Swing' joins
the University Symphony
for an evening of classical
music and Broadway hits
to benefit the School of
1 Music Scholarship Fund
and the University
Musical Society. Tickets
are $5, $7, $8, $9 and $25
at Burton Tower,
weekdays 9-4:30, Sat.
9-12. For a brochure:
665-3717.

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Roger pans East Quad
O NE OF THE MORE delightful things about Ann Arbor is the
weather. The weeks of sub-zero frigidity that we endure each
winter so derange most students as to cause them to regard tem-
peratures like Thursday's sixty degrees as positively tropical. No
matter that it will snow again, probably on the Tigers' opening day.
It's time for the frats to continue the tradition of conspicuous consum-
ption on the front lawn; time for those who are not content merely to
catch a frisbee, but must bat it around in the air before dropping it to
disturb our pastoral Diag.
You see how lucky we are: Were this UCLA, we would have spent
last week wearing sweaters and whining about the
cold.
It is sad, indeed, as one crosses the Diag on the way to East Quad for
an indoor afternoon of graffiti reading, to see the brazen and foolish
squirrel population. They will eat anything offered, and will not run
away until actually stepped on. Just imagine a pack of such mammals
scampering about while a freshman from Stockwell - who dots her i's
with little circles-feeds them granola. What if one of them, either the
squirrel or the young woman, has to go out into the real world one day?
One shudders to think.
WATCHING sch idyllic goings on, miserabile dictu, beats reading the
walls at East Quad by a good piece. I had high hopes of reporting the
latest New Wave catch phrase, the most up to date street philosophy,
or even, a few pungent leftover 60's radical slogans. Alas. Quaddie
scrawls are repetitive, boring, and repetitive. So what if "Social
Realism Rules?"
Worst of all, those residents trapped between Willard and Hill seem
to be taking themselves seriously. One person in particular has
disfigured countless walls with his green El Marko messages like
"Know Thyself," "Wake Up," and so forth. Tolerance is undeniably a
virtue, but in this case there is much to be said for slow and
imaginative torture.t
There are a precious few items worthy of consideration, such as the
artistically magnificent "Illustrated Illiad" in the south laundry
room, a triumphant work reminiscent of the Grad Library's "Conden-
sed Illiad:" "Sing muses of the wrath of Achilles, such was the funeral
of Hector, breaker of horses" with its attendant Reader's Digest ver-
sion, "Sing horses."
THE NORTH LAUNDRY ROOM'S contribution, several drawings
called "Graffiti Babies," are interesting, but lacking in vigor. The
vending machines on the main floor are another source of inspiration,
with snappy backchat such as "I need lunch," "Lunch needs you," and
an ice cream machine decorated with the obvious Wallace Stevens
quote: "The only emperor is the emperor of ice cream.
"Down with maintenance department facists!" insists a bored
defecator in a Prescott bathroom, apparently irked that words of
wisdom and import are every day being whitewashed into oblivion.
It's difficult to be harsh with the building staff which has no doubt seen
the depressing quality of local graffiti, and launched a concerted effort
to encourage the half in wit. '
A first floor Greene writer puts felt tip to wall and warns, "Prepare
to meet Thy Marker," which is as admirable an effort as the request
from first Hayden to "Bring Back Richard Nixon."
The loneliness and alienation that are apparently a staple of East
Quad's emotional life can be seen in the forthright demand "Notice
Me!" acrossthe hall from Benzinger Library, and "Look! If you write
here, everyone will 'notice!" beneath a light in one of the narrow
basement hallways.

Daily Photo by PAM MARKS
Tracy and Eloise Schwarz during their performance Friday night at the
Ark.
Duo muscally able,
but stage sho w lags

*a' r e 8:30 p.m. in Hil/Auditorium

By ERIC ZORN
"Tracy is a musician who had
dreams of being a farmer," smiled
Eloise Schwarz about her husband,
Tracy. "But on this tour we're not
really musicians, we're drivers." The
Pennsylvanian couple, on the end of a
three-week midwestern loop, offered a
pleasant evening of eclectic folk songs
Friday and Saturday nights at the Ark,
despite obvious travel fatigue.
The Schwarzes play old-time
American mountain songs, fiddle tunes,
Carter family favorites, Louisiana
Cajun music, plus a sampling of their
own compositions, and their musical
show is accomplished. Tracy, who fid-
dles with Mike Seeger's New Lost City
Ramblers during their rare appearan-
ces, picks an authentic Carter-style
guitar (simple but powerful bass runs)
and pumps on the Caun accordion as
well as providing the primary vocal
talent.
Overall, it was their stage show
which distracted most from the
modestly attended concert, and kept
things on a somewhat subdued note all
evening. Though they are sparklingly
personable folks, they don't really have

the timing or delivery to tell jokes, and
their improvised chatter often seemed
uncomfortable. The best performers
have to realize that the mood of an en-
tire evening can be saved or lost depen-
ding on the skill of the performer in
relating to his or her audience.
LEARNING FROM records and wat-
LEARNING FROM records and
''watching other fiddlers,'' Tracy has
developed a style which is a singular
cross between bluegrass and old-time
'fiddling, the former being distinguished
by runs of notes on a single string and
double slides, the latter recognizable by
its heavy rhythmic quality. "Bluegrass
music started out being expressive and
soulful," he said, "but the bands are
getting away from that now."
"The old rock and roll and the old
bluegrass as well as Cajun music all
have a great deal of soul," added
Eloise. " $ut I'd say in the last few
years a lot of music is losing that sense
of meaning."
Back home, the Schwarzes say, old-
time music suffers because "No one
wants to pay to hear it, and no one wan-
ts to sit still and listen. They all want to
dance," shrugged Tracy. "The concept
of a concert of this music is very dif-
ficult for them." °
Now it's back home for Tracy and
Eloise, who at times seemed almost
slaphappy as they worked their way
through the final set. They are a talen-
ted duo with fine harmonies, but have
got to come up with that something ex-
tra if they're going to draw the crowds
that the real showmen do.

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To Come,
Coming up next week on
the Daily Arts Page:
" THE RUSSIAN DANCERS
" CARLO MENOTTI
" MEL WINKLER,
BROADWAY STAR
" OREGON AT RACKHAM
" A. LITTLE NIGHT
MUSIC
plus all the latest in area
entertainment

DONNA WARNOCK Free Admission
Author of NUCLEAR POWER AND CIVIL LIBERTIES, an Execu-
tive Board Member of Supporters of Silkwood, and a founder
of Feminist Resources on Energy and Ecology, will be speaking
on CIVIL LIBERTIES AND NUCLEAR POWER
In response to the growing anti-nuclear movement, utility companies are
establishing spy networks between themselves, government intelliaence
agencies, and private security firms. A U.S. Gov't report on anti-nuclear spying
says, . . . Ihe most important aspect is intiltration of the groups them-
selves."(Rosenbaum Report, 1974)
CONF. RM. 4, MICH. UNION 27 MARCH 8 PM
This talk is sponsored by Women's StudiesWomens Program, Science for the People. Arbor Alliance,
the ACLU, Michigan Student Assembly, and the Nuclear issues Group _____________

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STUDENTS STUDENTS STUDENTS
ERIC'S
SECOND SERVE
Factory Outlet for
Discount Sporfs Apparel
Name Brand Overruns and Seconds
40-50% off
Retail Price
406 E. Liberty-663-6771
2UE ks. off State St.
STUDENTS STUDENTS STUDENTS

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CBS Reports
Viewpoint ectures
"Do Soviet Intentions Justify
High Defense Spending
and a Hard Foreign Policy"
a debate between
Admiral Elmo R. Zumwalt
and
Richard J. Barnet
MARCH 25 -8:00 p.m. RACKHAM AUD.
Tickets; $1.00 Union
$1.50 at Door

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737 N. Huron
(at Lowell, just east of the E.M,.U. Campus)

MONDAY-PITCHER NIGHT
College students and Frats/Sororities
No cover with proper I.D.

CRUSADERS
Six Hooper R - eaking Joe Sample
Robert Popwell-BillyRogers -Wilton Felder

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