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March 25, 1979 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1979-03-25

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page 6--Sunday, March 25, 1979-The Michigan Daily
Siegal and the Ministers will arouse

By LILY PRIGIONIERO
If someone tells you that Ann Arbor
is the cradle of the weird, you can
respond that, well, it is also the mid-.
western hotspot for artistic originality
and singular entertainment. Sooner or
later, one of our own, true-to-life,
authentic, down-in-history singer-
songwriters is going o hit it big, and
we'll nudge our friends in the ribs and
say, "Shoot, we used to see him down at
the bar, singing tunes and drinking
beer"

A likely candidate for 1future
noteriety is personable Dick Siegel, an
aspiring talent who's been hanging out
in Ann Arbor for the past five years and
entertaining people with his own unique
blend of music which threatens one day.
to set the toes of the nation to tapping.
He began with a creative impulse for
poetry and eight years' worth of ex-
perience on the guitar. "I started out
playing traditional and , all sorts of
stuff," he says, "just sitting around
with friends and singing. About five
years ago I played some songs at an

Ark 'hoot night,' and it was fun and ex-
citing to perform."
"I really like the atmosphere at the
Ark. The people who come really enjoy
the music. They're very, considerate,
intent, and uncritical. I can't imagine a
more comfortable performing
situation."
ABOUT THREE years ago, Ark
manager Linda Siglin set up Dick with
his first Thursday night concert.
"That's when I played with Sam Vee,
one of the most incredible guitar
players I know," he recalls. "Sam was
very inspiring, but at the point I got
serious about playing professionally, it
turned out he wasn't into it. He was in
school heading for a PhD in Sociology,
and his focus was on academic life."
That first night went exceptionally
well, and the entire experience was ex-
tremely encouraging. The security of
playing at the Ark made him com-
placent about finding other, more
broadening jobs, but the persuasive
push of strong encouragement convin-
ced him to make a demo tape which he
submitted to Ned Duke, manager of en-

tertainment at Mr. Flood's Party. Duke
really liked the songs, and to this day,
Dick plays regularly in front of nappily
bouncing enthusiasts at the crowded
Liberty Street nightspot.
After an inspired spell of song
writing, Dick decided that his own
songs were the most important thing
for him, and he felt he could write as
well as anyone who was writing songs.
"I'll go in spurts," he says.
"Sometimes I'll practice the guitar and
be really intent on that, then I'll feel
like I haven't written lyrics for a while,
I'll get in an anxious, uncomfortable
state, and write to let it go. Singing and
songwriting are my most direct chan-
nels towards creativity."
WHE HE GOT his first band
together, it consisted of Sammy Vee,
David Cahn on the dobro, and Greg
Raskin on the mandolin. After playing
with this assemblage at Flood's for a
while, Dick decided to .expand his
horizons. With Tom McGovern on flute
and vocals and Bruce Dondero on the
acoustic bass, the new group added a
dozen more dimensions to Dick's

ichard Benjamin Night
LARRY PEERCE 1969
GOODBYE COLUMBUS
BENJAMIN as a poor Bronx librarian who (much to the chagrin of her
parents) falls in love with BRENDA (Ali McGraw), a pampered Jewish prin-
cess from Westchester. The story is adapted from PHILIP ROTIS social satire
of the quality of life in Jewish upper middle class. It is RUMORED that Berg-
man saw this film before making CRIES AND WHISPERS. "GOODBYE COLUM-
BUS is the best American comedy this year." Chicago Sun Times (105m).
7:00 only.
FRANK PERRY 1970
DIARY OFA MAD HOUSEWIFE
CARRIE SNODGRASS received an Academy Award nomination for her
portrayal of a wife driven to the brink of madness by her relentless demands
of her status-conscious LAWYER husband (BENJAMIN). "DIARY is the first
intelligent film in recent years that attacks marriage, motherhood and men
without apologizing.. . it's one of the few films that is envisioned through the
eyes of a woman." (BENJAMIN AT HIS NEUROTIC BEST!) Original un-cut
version. (94m) 9:00 ONLY.
WED-Michael Cocoyannis Festival-ELECTRA
TONITE Angell Hall Aud. "A"
One show $1.50, Double $250

MARLON BRANDO and LEE MARVIN in 1953
THE WILD ONE
This is the original motorcycle film. Brando and his gang sweep down on a
small California town and terrorize its law-abiding inhabitants. Plenty of
wheelies, beer-drinking, fights, races and other action to keep things popping
until the state police arrive. Brando takes the cake as the alienated young
rebel with Lee Marvin providing the sticky-fingered icing as his psycho-cycle
rival. SHORT: Mighty Mouse in LAW AND ORDER.
MON: THE RED SNOWBALL TREE (Free at 7:00)
TUES: THE JAZZ SINGER

CINEMA GUILD

TONIGHT AT
7:00 & 9:05

OLD ARCH. AUD.
$1.50

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