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March 25, 1979 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1979-03-25

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ANN ARBOR'S 1st

Page 2-Sunday, March 25, 1979-The Michigan Daily
Engineering students
gather for Tech Day,

City pays for Open
Meeting Act suit

By BETH PERSKY
"A crowd of more than 500 pushed its
way through the Chrysler Center on
North Campus to take part in "Tech
Day" yesterday. The event, co-
sponsored by the. Engineering School,
MSA, and the Engineering Council, in-
W HAT: Top businesses offering their cluded a series of exhibits and tours
designed to teach participants about
merchandise or services at 50% off. engineering.
While the program, an annual even,
W H EN: April 10 am to 6 pm. is aimed specifically at incoming
8thengineering students and freshpersons
in Engineering who are still undecided
W HERE: u of M Track and Tennis build- abouta major, "Tech Day" also attrac-
ted many upperclasspersons and mem-
ing. bers of the community.
THE EXHIBITS included everything
from a set of waves projected on a TV
8 hours of/SALES MADNESS. screen for Computer Engineering to a
model of a ship for Marine
For show space contact Engineering. Children as well as adults
Allan Goode at 663-5907. played with mechanical gadgets
crowded the tours of the University's
nuclear reactor and of the labs of the
departments of Engineering Science,

Chemical Engineering.
A film shown on one floor demon-
strated the difficulties of transporting
nuclear wastes, while a video tape on
the floor below which recounted the dif-
ficulties in engineering during floods
and earthquakes was illustrated with
pictures of recent examples.
CORPORATE EXECUTIVES
dressed in business suits gave their pit-
ches to undecided engineering students.
Companies represented included Ford,
Chrysler, General Motors, Proctor &
Gamble, and Bechtel.
Interested engineering students sat
at exhibits representing their depar-
tments, ready to hand out advice and
literature. Representatives from the
American Society for Civil
Engineering, the American Nuclear
Society, the Society of , Military
Engineers, and the Michigan
Metallurgical Society also attended.
THE ENGINEERING Council, who
coordinated the event, sent invitations
to all high school seniors admitted to
the Engineering School and to high
school science teachers within a 100
mile radius of the University. Radio
anO newspaper advertising encouraged
the public as well. '
"It's an annual event, and has been
going on for at least 15 years," said
Craig Bloomer, Administrative Vice
President for the Engineering Council.
"I think it's improved since last
year," said Engineering junior Larry
Nowak. "Last year the exhibits weren't
as swamped as they are this year. The
majority of people have found them to
be really interesting."

By ELISA ISAACSON
The local Democrats' Open Meetings
Act suit against the city and Council
Republicans - a thorn in the GOP's
side since last June - finally came to
rest when the city paid the plaintiffs
$2,700 in court costs earlier this month.
The money was paid by the city,
rather than the individual Republican
Council members involved, but Mayor.
Louis Belcher said yesterday he is un-
certain whether the city's insurance
company will cover the costs.
SVVERAL LOCAL Democrats said
they resent the fact "the Republicans.
were not made individually responsible'
for the court costs. Councilman Ken-
neth Latta (D-First Ward), one of the
plaintiffs in the case, said he feels the
GOP should not have been represented
as the city of Ann Arbor, since "it was
their (the Republicans') basic illegality
that was the issue." Latta pointed out
that the individual plaintiffs would have.
been obliged to pay their own court
costs if they had lost the case.
According to plaintiff and Coun-
cilmember Leslie Morris (D-Second
Ward,) "We would have preferred to
sue the individual Republicans," but
because of the.,nature of the suit the
defendants were listed as the city as
well as individuals.
Last May 23, Republican Council
members held a closed caucus meeting
at which, the Democrats alleged,
changes in the city's 1978-79 budget
were discussed. Budget reallocations of
$328,500 were approved by the
Republican-dominated Council shortly
after the caucus meeting took place.

CHARGING THE Republicans with
violating the Michigan Open Meetings
Act - which prohibits secret meetings
in many cases - three Council
Democrats, two private individuals,
and the local chapteF of the League of
Women Voters filed suit in the Ann Ar-
bob Circuit Court asking the budget
changes discussed at the GOP caucus
be overturned. Plaintiffs in the case
were Councilmembers Latta, Morris,
Susan Greenberg (D-First Ward),
University Economics Professor
William Shepherd, University Law
student Paul Pratt, and the League.
Last September, after a summer of
deliberations, a judge ruled that the
May GOP caucus was illegal, and
declared the budget amendments null
and void.
The local case served as the testing
ground for Attorney General Frank
Kelley's interpretation of the Open
Meetings Act, which advised that local
caucus meetings with a quorum prese-
must be held in public places and open
to anyone who wishes to attend.
COUNCIL Republicans, however,
argued in the court that their May
meeting did not constitute a quorum,
since only six members attended, with
the sixth arriving near the end of the
session.
The Republicans also said that no
vote was taken on the budget at the
meeting. They said not enough infor-
mation was known about the city's
financial situation to make any
decisions until the day after the
meeting, when Mayor Louis Belcher
discussed the matter with City Ad-
ministrator Sylvester Murray.

Don't be left out
of your
1980 MICHIGANENSIAN Yearbook!

Carter braces for Teamster walkout

"
o
"
" .
Ft.
. ,,,

Sign up for an appointment TODAY by call-
ing 764-0561, weekdays' from 7 p.m.-9
p.m. Or stop by our office at 420 Maynard
(next to S.A.B.).

These portraits will appear in the SENIOR
TION of the 1980 yearbook.

SEC-

WASHINGTON (AP)-A worried
Carter administration is quietly
drawing up contingency plans for han-
dling a national emergency it hopes
won't occur-a nationwide trucking
strike on April 1.
The chances of a walkout by 300,000
drivers and warehouse workers depend
on the outcome of contract talks bet-
ween the Teamsters union and the
trucking industry, who are bargaining
under intense pressure from President
Carter's inflation fighters.
WITHIN THIS chilly climate,
workers are voting at local union halls
this weekend on whether to authorize
union leaders to call a walkout if a set-
tlement is not reached by midnight next
Saturday, when the current master
freight agreement expires. Vote totals
won't be known until later this week. '
As they approach the deadline,
bargainers are far apart over economic
issues because of Carter's insistence
that the nation's largest union settle

within his "voluntary" 7 per cent wage
guidelines. Industry proposals are
within that range, but the union wants
about double that.
Government, union and industry of-
ficials say it is too early to predict the
outcome. They continue to express
hope, at least outwardly, that a strike
will be averted.
BUT IF THERE is a walkout, the ef-
fect on the economy will be swift and
devastating, according to industry
estimates.
"After two weeks there would be a
very serious crisis in the economy,"
said one official, who asked not to be
named. The first shortages would occur
among auto parts, clothing, drugs,
machinery and processed foods, he
said.
"Many plants operate on day-to-day
shipments," the official added.
"Because of computers and interstate
highways, trucks in many ways have
become rolling warehouses."

Fi

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\JJORKING ON A
Term Paper....
Dissertation...
Thesis...?
THEN YOU SHOULD BROWSE

THAT IS WHY Carter's aides are
preparing internal reports on ways to
keep essential services and cargoes
moving and legal steps the president
would have to take to order truckers
back to work. The administration also
is considering ways to deal with violen-
ce that many officials fear could erupt.
"You don't have to tell these guys
how to be tough," said one government
official. He added that a Teamsters'
strike would make a recent violent
strike by independent steelhaulers
"look like a Sunday school picnic."
Government officials refuse to
discuss details of their contingency
plans, other than to acknowledge that
Carter almost certainly would invoke
the Taft-Hartley Act to order striking
Teamsters back to work for an 80-day
"cooling off" period.
But the union anticipates such a
move. Consequently, some Teamsters'
sources say, union President Frank
Fitzsimmons might call for work
slowdown or regional strikes rather
than a national walkout.
In that way, says one government
source, Fitzsimmons could create
economic chaos without causing the
national emergency required for Carter
to use Taft-Hartley.
THE MICHIGAN DAILY
(USPS 344-900)
Volume LXXXIX, No. 139
Sunday, March 25, 1979
is edited and managed by students at
the University of Michigan. Published
daily Tuesday through Sunday morn-
ings during the University year at 420
Maynard Street, Ann Arbor, Michigan
48109. Subscription rates: $12 Septem-
ber through April (2 semesters); $13 by
mail outside Ann Arbor. Summer ses-
sion published Tuesdaythrough Saturn
day mornings. Subscription rates:
$6.50.in Ann Arbor; $7.00 by-mail outs
side Ann Arbor. Second class postage
aid at Ann Arbor, Michigan. POST-
MASTER: Send address changes to
THE MICHIGAN DAILY, 420 Maynard
Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109.
U}

THROUGH OUR WRITING
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AREA. WE FEATURE

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MANUAL FOR

WRITERS OF TERM PAPERS,
THESES & DISSERTATIONS
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WRITERS OF RESEARCH

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PAPERS, THE

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AND TO MA KE THE A CTUA L

EXECUTIVE ORDER
9066
March 6 - April 6
An exhibition produced by the
California Historical Society.
describing the experience of
Japanese Americans during World
War IH. Included-are rmany'
photographs by Dorothea Lange.
Opening Reception: March 16,
9:30 p.m. Symposium at 730 p.m.
Speakers: Professor Harry H. L.

TYPING

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