100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

March 20, 1979 - Image 11

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1979-03-20

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

ALL-BIG TEN NIT FINAL ASSURED:
Carroll explode
= NEW YORK (AP)-Purdue strong- State meeting late last night at Madison 22 more af
'man Joe Barry Carroll poured in 42 Square Garden. ting down i
points, leading the 15th-ranked Boiler- The smaller Alabama team was Purdue mol
makers to a runaway 87-68 basketball never able to handle Carroll, a 7-foot-1, 21 points ne
victory over Alabama last night in the 240-pounder who was able to score vir- The Boil
semifinals of the 42nd National In- tually at will inside.
vitation Tournament. CARROLL COLLECTED 20 points in
- The Boilermakers advanced to the first half, along with 14 by Jerry
tomorrow night's championship game Sichting, to power the Big Ten team in-
against the winner of the Indiana-Ohio to a 43-32 lead at the half. Carroll scored

The Michigan Daily-Tuesday, March 20, 1979-Page 11

s as Purdue romps

ter intermission before sit-
in the final few minutes as
)unted its lead to as many as
ar the end.
ermakers broke open the

A NEFF
Is
ENOUGH

game with a 12-point run late in the
second half with Carroll contributing a
field goal in the game-breaking burst.
The score was 61-54 with 9:43 left in
favor of the Boilermakers before they
went on their scoring tear.
,_When it was over, Purdue had a 73-54
lead with 5:24 remaining.
SICHTING ADDED 20 points for the
Boilermakers, 27-7.
Reggie King and Robert Scott each
scored 21 points for Alabama, 22-11.
The Crimson Tide was inhibited by
foul trouble throughout the game. Two
players, Eddie Phillips and Phillip
Lockett, both fouled out trying to guard
the irrepressible Carroll, who hit 13 of
his 16 field goal attempts.
Phillips was held to four points, 11
below his average, before he fouled out.
"CARROLL PLAYED a great
game," said Purdue coach Lee Rose af-
ter watching his star center score a
career-high point total. The highest
previous game for Carroll had been 36
points against Iowa earlier this season.
"Believe it or not," said Rose, "I
think he needs to be more physical. But
I'm sure he will be.
"No doubt he will make a great pro."
Pointing to his team's 61 per cent
shooting, Rose noted, "That certainly

didn't hurt us." Alabama shot a mere 39
per cent for the game.
"EVERYONE KNOWS their role on
this team," said Sichting, who added
seve assists and teamed with Brian
Waltker to give the Boilermakers
sparkling backcourt play. Walker han-
ded out nine assists, many of them to
Carroll.

By Billy Neff

BULLETIN
Indiana University defeated
Ohio State last night, +64-55, .nto
set up an all-Indiana cham-
pionship game in the National
Invitational Basketball Tour-
nament.
Indiana, 21-12, will meet Pur-
due, 27-7, Wednesday evening
at nine for the NIT crown. Ohio
State and Alabama will play
the consolation game at 7 pm.
Both games will be played in
Madison Square Garden.

Provo's the place..,.
..Meyer's the man
A S THE FINAL SECONDS ticked off the clock in Provo, Utah, Saturday,
a dream was fulfilled and I, for one, was exhilarated.
Ray Meyer, who should be collecting social security checks within the
year, is off to Salt Lake City to coach his DePaul five to a possible national
championship. Although Meyer is the winninigest active coach in college
basketball, he has never made the national semifinals (the Final Four). His
dream was to accomplish this feat and he finally did-his speedy inner city
contingent vanquished powerful UCLA, 95-91 in the Western Regional cham-
pionship.
Maybe my roommate said it best about Meyer: "It was a real big
exhilaration for me,. I was so happy for the guy (Meyer) that it brought tears
to my eyes to see him finally make it (to the Final Four)."
I could not agree more!
Throughout the second half, though, it seemed like Meyer's dream
would not come to pass. His DePaul Blue Demons had led by a 51-34 count at
halftime. They had literally run the vaunted Bruins off the hardwood in
Provo.
The second half, however, was to be an entirely different story. UCLA
kept chipping away and the excitement continued to mount. As the lead
dwindled, the TV cameras kept panning over to Meyer to see his expression.
His expression never changed. It mirrored the confidence he had in his
players. He somehow knew this was to be his year. But was it? Al McGuire,
NBC's colorful commentator, was noticeably rooting for the ageless Meyer.
"Only four more minutes until Salt Lake City," said the former Marquette
mentor.
America pulled for Meyer
Everyone, McGuire included, vanted to see Meyer fulfill his dream.
As UCLA crept within two points, McGuire wailed, "only 90 seconds until
Salt Lake City for Ray Meyer!"
Finally, all doubt was quashed when freshman sensation Mark Aguirre
slammed the ball through the DePaul net. Meyer's introspective face lit up;
he was beaming. He had finally accomplished his goal!
As the buzzer sounded, the players came over and hugged their leader.
They loved this man; it was written all over their faces.
But who wouldn't? He had coached basketball at DePaul for 37 years,
worked with two-handed set shots and two-handed dunks. He had labored for
37 years-coaching the world's most famous bespectacled basketball player,
George Mikan, and three of his own sons. He had faced much adversity, but
through it all, he had never lost any enthusiasm for his sport.
What many people don't realize is that it is extremely difficult to recruit
for a school like DePaul. This small Catholic university is stuck in the nor-
thern part of Chicago-not exactly the high rent district! How can it possibly
compete with the Notre Dames, the Kentuckys and the Michigans when it
comes to recruiting? Answer: it cannot and oftentimes, Meyer has had to
work with second-rate players.
Last year, many thought, was his best team ever and virtually final
chance to reach the Final Four. Prior to the regional championship against
Notre Dame a season ago, his star center and leading scorer, Dave Corzine,
had broken his hand. Corzine was virtually useless to the Blue Demons and
Notre Dame crushed them with a strong second half, 84-64.
No one expected anything from Meyer this season as he lost four of his
first six players, including Corzine. But Meyer coaxed them back to the
national spotlight again by adding a real blue chipper in Aguirre, a transfer
student (Jim Mitchem) and the third guard from last year, Clyde Bradshaw.
They did not have a bona fide center so he used an offense without a cen-
ter. And his bench strength was virtually nonexistent so he played his five
starters the whole way, except for a substitute for the injured Curtis
Watkins.
These strategies had worked and when the buzzer sounded and he was
embracing his players, I welled up also. Everything this man had worked for
through all his years had been worth it. Whether it had taken 37 years or just
one year like his opponent in the next game (Indiana State's Bill Hodges),
his dream had been realized. There was no denying him now. His trip to Salt
Lake City would be so sweet!
NBC recognized this beautiful spectacle also, by awarding a scholarship
to DePaul in Meyer's name as the game's most valuable player. Meyer
symbolized to many the puritan ethic and no one wants to stand in the way of
a dream, especially an American dream. And we all know how America
loves an underdog-therefore, the victory was just as sweet for the
American public as it was for Ray Meyer.

Joe Barry Carroll

B ruin Fans are calm
despite recent slide'

LOVE RELATIONS"IPS
-Do You Know What You Want?
-Do You Get What You Need?
-Are You Satisfied?
Peer Counselors of Counseling Services are
Offering a FREE WORKSHOP for Under-
graduates on Understanding Your Current
or Past Relationships.
Saturday, March 24, *10 a.m.-3 p.m.
To Register or for More In formation Call
76-GUIDE or Come to the 76-GUIDE Desk,
1st Floor Michigan Union
* Lunches not included
BOARD FOR
STUDENT PUBLICATIONS
ELECTIONS
(Held with MSA Elections)
TWO STUDENT MEMBERSHIPS OPEN
" ONE MUST BE ENROLLED
UNDERGRADUATE STUDENT
" ONE MUST BE ENROLLED
GRADUATE STUDENT
" TERM TWO YEARS
PETITIONS AT
MICHIGAN STUDENT ASSEMBLY OFFICE
3RD FLOOR MICHIGAN UNION
DEADLINE TO FILE MARCH 22, 1979

LOS ANGELES (AP)-The last four
-not the Final Four-concern UCLA
basketball fans after four seasons of
falling short of their accustomed
national title.
UCLA teams of John Wooden won 10
National Collegiate Athletic
Association championships, eight in
succession before Wooden retired on
top in1975.
Since then, the best showing came
under Wooden's immediate successor
as coach, Gene Bartow. He got the
Bruins to the Final Four in the NCAA
tournament in 1976, losing to eventual
champion Indiana in the semifinals.
Former Wooden assistant Gary Cun-
ningham took over two years ago when
Bartow had enough of Wooden's
shadow. Now at Alabama-
Birmingham, Bartow literally was
driven out of town for his teams'
sins-third in the diation and tied for fif-

th in the nation in his years at UCLA.
Alumni. discontent seems to have
cooled during the 50-8 won-lost record
and two more tie-for-fifth NCAA
finishes under Cunningham, who was
UCLA alumni director just before
becoming coach.
"Everywhere I go, they've thanked
me for a great season. I've never seen
any hostile experience toward me or
the team."
SHORT or LONG
Hairstyles for
Men and Women
DASCOLA STYLISTS
. 615 E. Liberty-668-9329
" 3739 Washtenaw-971-9975
" 613 N. Maple-761 -2733
" 611 E. University-662-0354

N-i

'>

7-11 p.m.
HALF PRICE
on
BEER

whom
VWN
f i, J
J J
f{{ff
hI fF
f /
lit -1111. 146fl 111
co AMSTI*:
ROME
:
J J>
.111 :;I'.IN'
rf fr
«;f

GET THIS UNIOUE "SAY BULL"ATHLETIC SHIRT CUSTOM-PRINTED
WITH THE NAME OF YOUR SCHOOL FOR ONLY $5.50.
Bull your way through college in style! With a genuine Schlitz Malt Liquor bull shirt.
Featuring our Schlitz Malt Liquor bull with royal blue 3/4 length sleeves and white shirt body.
It's made of 70% cotton and 30% polyester. And it's 100% you, because we custom-print
the name of your school right on the front.
It's the shirt you'll wear proudly all year long. For jogging, class, team sports and
getting together with friends for a round of Schlitz Malt Liquor. After all, if you're
going to "SAY BULL" across your chest, you might as well start backing it up.
-------- ---------- --- -----
MAIL TO:"SAY BULL"JERSEYOFFER
ROBOX919'I.T.PAUILMINNESOTA 55191 :,.

r
Em

//F} : ;

Wednesday-Half Price on
Beer & Liquor 7-10 pm

. s -- - , - - ~ ----
Please send Schlitz Malt Liquor "SAY BULL" College Name Athletic Jersey(s)
3 (quantity)
S@ $5.50 each, including College Name Personalization, postage and handling. "
I Sizes available: ~~

I

YI .i6 ..jA .

'

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan