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March 15, 1979 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1979-03-15

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Gr 4
lrl'U SEE NWS lVN CALL - :rgtAY
Bo wling for whizzes
If you read the almanac every evening and remember all your
chemistry formulas, consider competing in the Michigan College
Bowl, a, day long cerebral tournament scheduled for the Union
Ballroom on March 31. Teams of four are being encouraged to register
with Union Programming at 763-1107 within the week. Contestants
must be full-time undergraduate students and it'll take $10 to become
part of the Bowl. Questions come from the National College Bowl and
will cover a broad range of academic areas. Quick-what's the capital
of Peru?"
MSA Cut-up
Humor runs rampant in the
Michigan Student Assembly
(MSA) chambers during the
weekly Tuesday night meetings.
Lately though, treasurer Brad'
Canale has been stealing ther
show from other Assembly mem-
bers. President Eric Arnson has
recently introduced Canale's of-
ficer report as a "monologue"
and the "entertainment" portion
of the meeting. Tuesday night,,
although Canale promised his
report would be "serious",
nevertheless managed to main-3
tain his reputation as residentf
comedian. In his report, Canale
used the word "truncated," and
after noticing Assembly mem-"
bers snickering at his use of the
word joked, "I just learned that
word today." uess there has to
be one in every crowd.
Take ten -
Janis Joplin and James Cotten sang on campus on the evening of
March 15, 1969 to huge crowds at Crisler Arena. Joplin and her 26-piece
orchestra, the San Francisco Pops, were in town the evening before
they were to appear on the Ed Sullivan show. Also on that day, Soviet
and Communist Chinese troops clashed for the second time in two
weeks. Each side charged the other with starting the "armed
provocation". Fighting erupted as an outgrowth of a dispute over
rights to an island in the Ussuri: River, which is the boundary between
Manchuria and the Soviet far east maritime province.
Happenings FILMS
A-V Services-Hyperactive Children; Hypercholesteremia, 12:10
p.m., Auditorium School of Public Health II.
17th Ann Arbor Film Festival-showings 7, 9, 11 p.m., Old Architec-
ture auditorium.
Mediatrics-W. C. Fields night; My Little Chickadee 7, 10 p.m. and
The Bank Dick 8:30 p.m., Assembly Hall, Union.
Ann Arbor Film Co-op-Fellini's '82, 7, 9:15 p.m., Auditorium A,
Angell Hall.
Alternative Action-Arsenic and Old Lace, 7, 9:15 p.m., Natural
Science Auditorium.
Ypsi-Arbor Black Music Festival, Carmen Jones, 9 p.m., Black
Cultural Lounge, Mosher/Jordan Hall.
PERFORMANCES
Studio Theatre-Bullins' "A Son, Come Home", 4:10 p.m., Arena
Theatre, Frieze Building.
Ypsi Arbor Black Music Festival: The Center for Afro-American
and African Studies and S.I.S.T.E.R. of Stockwell Hall-Dr. Morris
Lawrence, a performance lecture entitled "Afro-Musicology," 7:30
p.m., Blue Lounge, Stockwell Hall.
Guild House-C.-Gregory, J. Moore, P. Plum, poetry reading, 7:30
p.m., 802 Monroe.
Russian Festival-New poems by Josef Brodski and Aleksej
Tsvetkov, 8 p.m., Rackham Amphitheatre.
Canterbury Loft-"The Fantasticks," 8p.m., 332S. State.
Aeror's Ensemble-"The Abdication" by Ruth Wolff, 8 p.m., Lydia
Mendelssohn Theatre. SPEAKERS
Investigative reporter Daniel Zwerdling-"The Media and En-
vironmental Action," 9-11 a.m, Room 2024, School of Natural Resour-
ces.
Collegiate Institute for Values and Science-Stanford Ovshinsky,
Co-founder and President of Energy Conservation Devices, Inc., "The
Politics of Technology Development," 4 p.m., 231 Angell Hall.
English-G. B. Cross, Eastern Michigan University, "Blood, Thun-
der and Tea Cups: Victorian Melodrama," 4 p.m., East Lecture
Room, Rackham.
Michigan Economics Society-J. M. Cudlip speakjng on
"Economics in the Steel Industry," 5 p.m., third floor Economics
Building.
American opera composer Gian Carlo Menotti-"An Evening with

Gian Carlo Menotti," 8 p.m., Rackham Auditorium.
MEETINGS
Rally on the Diag against University investments in South
Africa-with Amen Ra (African Arts Troop) and Jennifer Davis
(American Committee on Africa), 10:45 a.m.
Michigan Economics Society-5 p.m., Room 301, Economics
Building.
Revolutionary Communist Youth Brigade-program celebrating In-
ternational Women's Day, 7:30 p.m., Henderson Room, Michigan
League.
Women in Action-8:15 p.m., Couiens Hall Living Room.
MISCELLANEOUS
International Night-French menu, 5-7:15 p.m., Michigan League
Cafeteria.
Urban Planning Program-registration for March 15-17 conference
"'Recycling the City: Planning for more with less," 7-9 p.m., Michigan
Union.
Hillel Foundation/AKTSIA-opening reception, -"From Moscow to
Jerusalem," Soviet Jewish Art, 8 p.m., 1429 Hill St. Exhibit can be
viewed through March 28 at 1-5 p.m., and 7-9 p.m. daily.
Undergraduate Political Science Association-Career' Reception
with lawyers, judges, and educators, 8 p.m., Anderson} Room,
Michigan Union.
AIESEC International Exchange Program membership
drive-Wolverine Room, Business School.
UAC-Coffeehouse, refreshments, entertainment, 8 p.m., Main'
floor, lounge, Michigan Union.
UAC, MSA, WCBN-recruitment drive for those interested in com-
mittee positions and chairpersonships, 10:15 p.m., East Quad
Greene Lounge.
Truman on trial
Two juries in Independence, Missouri are currently deliberating the
guilt or innocence of President Harry Truman on charges of "war
crimes" in connection with his 1945 decision to drop the atomic bomb
on Japan. The juries, all ninth graders in Janet Fielder's social studies
class at Bridger Junior High, are also learning an invaluable lesson in
political pressure. It seems that the director of the Truman library in
Independence is upset by what he calls a "screwball idea'k putting

-

The Michigan Daily-Thursday, March 15, 1979-Page:3
COLLEGE HAD BLOCKED UNFAVORABLE EDITORIAL:
Fired student editor wins suit

BY ELEONORA DI LISCIA
A legal precedent on the rights of the
student free press have been
established by a case involving a
student editor, Samuel Kemp, from
Wayne County Community College
(WCCC), and the administration's at-
tempt to stop him from printing an un-
favorable story.
The case was settled out of court in
the student's favor. U.S. District Judge
Ralph Guy ordered the administration
of WCCC never to exercise prior
restraint of the press in any way, shape
or form again,. He also awarded Kemp
$6 as an honorary award and free
tuition at the college through 1981.
Kemp is not making use of the free
tuition since he completed coursework
at WCCC and has transferred to Wayne
State University.
THEDEFENDANTS named in the
suit were WCCC, President Reginald
Wilson; Dean of Student Services Ar-
thur Carter; director of student ser-
vices Mark McPherson and coordinator
of student activities Elizabeth Burris.
Kemp initially filed suit when he was
fired as editor in chief of the student
newspaper, the Open Door, for trying to
publish an editorial unfavorable to the
administration. The editorial commen-
Daily Official Bulletin
THURSDAY.MARCH 15.1979
Daily Calendark
Physics/Astronomy: C. Rebbi, BNL, "Interaction
Energy of Superconducting Vortices," 2038 Randall.
4 p.m.
English: G. B. Cross, Eastern Michigan-U3.,
"Blood, Thunder and Tea Cups: Victorian
Melodrama,"E. lee rm., Rackham,4 p.m.
Guild House: C. Gregory. J. Moore, P. Plum,
poetry reading,802 Monroe, 7:30 p.m.
Music School: Gian-Carlo Menottispeaker, 8p:m.
SUMMER PLACEMENT
3200SAB 763-4117
ChevroletInformation Service,.Detroit, Mi. will in-
terview Thurs. Mar. 22 from 9 to 5. Must have com-
pleted sophomore or junior year-majoring in com-
puter science. Register by phone or in person.
Camp Wise, Ohio, Soc. Work Camp. Will interview
Tues., Mar. 20 from 10 to 5. Openings for specialists
in arts/crafts, nature, tripping. sports waterfront
(WSI), village supervisors.

ted on how the college administration
had offered its vice president $45,000 to
resign and how this money could be put
to better use.
According to the verified amended
complaint, the defendants demanded
that Kemp change the article, ordered
the printer not to publish it, changed the
locks on the newspaper office's door,
and fired Kemp without giving him a
hearing.
When Kemp publicly protested his
firing, the administration claimed that
his grades were below passing and that
a student had to have a 2.5 average to
hold a post at the paper. Kemp main-
tained that his grade point was above
2.5.
BY FIRING KEMP, the ad-
ministration violated his first and four-
teenth amendment rights, the court
found. According to Kemp.'s attorney
Herschel Fink of the American Civil
Liberties Union, "Our intention was to
vindicate his rights as student editor
and we feel we were successful at
that."
According to the Open Door's policy
manual,, the paper is not to yield "to
pressures from individuals or groups
among administrators, faculty, staff
and students, but will strive to report
news truthfully, objectively, and im-
partially by presenting both sides of an
issue."
Furthermore, it is the responsibility
of the paper to oppose administration
THE MICHIGAN DAILY
(USPS 344-900)
Volume LXXXIX, No. 130
Thursday, March 15, 1979
is edited and managed by, students at
the University of Michigan. P~ublished
daily Tuesday through Sunday morn-
ings during the University year at 420'
Maynard Street, Ann Arbor, Michigan
48109. Subscription rates: $12 Septem-
ber through April (2 semesters): $13 by
mail outside Ann Arbor. Summer ses-
sion published Tuesday through Satur-
day mornings. Subscription rates:
$6.50 in Ann Arbor; $7.00 by mail out-
side Ann Arbor. Second class postage
aid at Ann Arbor, Michigan. POST-
MATER: Send address changes to
THE MICHIGAN DAILY, 420 Maynard
Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109.

"when the actions of these groups are
not deemed in the best interest of the
college."
BESIDES THE prior restraint
question, the actions of the college ad-
ministration caused a breach of con-
tract of these written rules, Kemp's at-
torney charged. The officials were also
charged with invasion of privacy for
saying that Kemp's grades were below
a 2.5 average.
Although the award seems small,
Fink pointed out that "We were not out
for money. We were out to establish a
principle."
The defendant's lawyer, George
I

Bushnell, said that they denied all the
charges and that he did not believe the
college had exercised prior restraint.
Instead, he said Kemp's firing was part
of a "difficult sequence of events." :
Bushnell said Kemp had been fired
due to his grade point average and not
because of the article. He said, the
resolution of the case "by way of, set-
tlement out of court "gives some sub-
stance to the college position."
BUSHNELL explained that Ker~p
may not have been aware he had below
a 2.5 averageebecause of a unique policy
of the college of keeping two different
transcripts.

The Ann Arbor Film Cooperative presents at Aud A
Thursday, March 15
jX
8%2
(Otto e mezzo, Frederico Fellini, 1963) 7 & 9:15-AUD. A
Marcello Mastroianni, the film director haunted by fears of his failing inspira-
tion, embarks on'o grandiose project that will turn his own life into a film.
Fellini's homa e to himself? Perhaps, but certainly THE paradigmatic film about
filmmaking. The title? This was Fel lini's eight and one-half film. "Ranks among
the most brilliant cinematic works of our time."-ludith Crist. With CLAUDIA
CARDINALE, SANDRA MILO. In Italian, with subtitles.
Tontorrow: Mel Brooks'
HIGH ANXIETY and THE PRODUCERS

Frank Capra's 1944
ARSENIC AND OLD LACE
A zany, macabre comedy. CARY GRANT is a mild-mannered drama critic who
discovers that two kindly aunts of his have a habit of luring lonely old men
into their home, poisoning them, and 'then burying the corpses in the base-
ment. Things complicate when two male murderers, unaware of the two
women's hobby, move into the same house. PETER LORRE, too.
TONITEoat 7:00 & 9:15- Nat. Sci. Aud. $1.50
ALTERNATIVE ACTION FILM SERIES
Saturday: YOUNG FRANKENSTEIN
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3 different shows nightly
7, 9 & 11 through Fri.
& Sunday. Saturday 1:00, 7:00
& 9:00 p.m. At the Old Architecture
Auditorium.
tickets: $1.75

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WEDNESDAY IS MONDAY IS
"BARGAIN DAY" "GUEST NIGHT"
$1.50 until 5:30 TWO ADULTS ADMITTED
FOR PRICE OF ONE

...........

ADULTS FEI.,,SAT.. SUN.
IV[. &i1HOLIDAYS $3.51
MON.-THURS. EVk _. 11
ALL MATNEES 03.3

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CHILD TO 14 81.30 I

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Sweaters
Warm Ups,
Jazz Pants

* Legwarmers
" Unitards
* Knit Tights

Long Sleeved Leotards
We lhave to make room for

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our summer line of swimsuits.

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